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Today's News

  • Schools have contingency plan for school opening

     According to Shelby County Superintendent James Neihof, school will begin on the current planned date, regardless of whether or not the Moorman School is completed.

    In his report to the school board at Thursday’s regular meeting, Neihof revealed that the district has a backup plan if the construction on the new Marnel C. Moorman School is incomplete by the school year’s scheduled starting date of Sept. 3.

  • Farris honored with Power of One Award

     One Shelby County educator and community leader has been honored for her groundbreaking work.

    Dr. Elaine Farris, who was the first African-American to serve as a Kentucky superintendent, received the Kentucky Association of School Administrators’ Power of One Award for her barrier-breaking leadership. She first became superintendent with Shelby County Public Schools, taking the position on June 22, 2004.

  • Police raid finds LSD, MDMA, stolen gun

    A police raid in Shelbyville led to the confiscation of several contraband items and three arrests at a location on Webbmont Circle.

    The Kentucky State Police teamed with the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office for the drug bust. They managed to confiscate two pounds of processed marijuana, one ounce of suspected MDMA and 40 strips of LSD. They also seized $5,000 in cash and three firearms, one of which was stolen, a press release stated.

    The MDMA had an estimated street value of $3,000 and the LSD $1,000.

  • Shelbyville Horse Show impacts economy, traffic

    Shelby County Horse Show Jubilee and the horse show itself bring visitors and residents alike to Shelbyville.

    But measuring financial, tourism and workforce impacts during those two weeks showcases the effort that goes into both and the positive environment both foster.

    According to ShelbyKY Tourism Executive Director Katie Fussenegger, the average yearly lodging occupancy rate is 63 percent, but during the horse show and Jubilee, occupancy jumps to more than 90 percent.

  • Shelbyville Horse Show impacts economy, traffic

    Shelby County Horse Show Jubilee and the horse show itself bring visitors and residents alike to Shelbyville.

    But measuring financial, tourism and workforce impacts during those two weeks showcases the effort that goes into both and the positive environment both foster.

    According to ShelbyKY Tourism Executive Director Katie Fussenegger, the average yearly lodging occupancy rate is 63 percent, but during the horse show and Jubilee, occupancy jumps to more than 90 percent.

  • Carlen Pippin Point of Light

    One thing that retired veterinarian Carlen Pippin hasn’t resigned from is community service.

    The long-time vet — over three decades caring for extended family members, i.e. fur babies — now focuses most of his energy on his fellow men and women in the community he lives in and loves, specifically helping military veterans and children in need. “Animals and children go together. They just have a special bond,” Pippin, 70, said. “I’m so blessed to have spent 31 years as a vet.”

  • Shelbyville Horse Show Jubilee Kick-off Breakfast

    What’s a Shelby County event in late July without horses?

    Plenty of Saddlebreds trotted around the barn at the Shelby County Horse Show Jubilee Breakfast Thursday morning, the kick-off of the world-class Shelbyville Horse Show.

    Beautiful Undulata Farm hosted the annual meal with keynote speaker Ryan Quarles, Kentucky Dept. of Agriculture commissioner.

    State and local dignitaries attended the breakfast including State Senator Paul Hornback, Shelby County Judge-Executive Dan Ison, Shelbyville Mayor David Eaton and Simpsonville Mayor Cary Vowels.

  • Gabe Biagi attends Governor's School for the Arts - GSA

    Governor’s School for the Arts offers more than training and scholarships to Kentucky’s artistic students.

    GSA offers a unique perspective on life in the arts.

    So when GSA representatives visited Louisville’s St. Xavier High School to recruit applicants for its summer program, Gabe Biagi wasn’t sure whether to apply.

  • William Loving gets wish to ride a train

    Opal’s Dream Foundation gives Shelbyville man chance of a lifetime

    One man’s fascination with trains morphed into a life-long wish that will soon come true.

    Crestview Center resident William Loving, 71, played with electric trains as a boy growing up in Shelbyville, but he never rode the rails.

    “I’ve always wanted to ride on a train. We used to have one here in Shelbyville,” he said.

  • A Place to Sleep celebrates 10 years

    It was a decade ago that Jessica Collins saw “The Blind Side” and wondered how many children didn’t have a bed of their own.

    Collins was 10 years old at the time and felt the need to do something to help children who didn’t have a bed, so she helped found a charity to change it for the better and A Place to Sleep was born.

    Now, the organization Collins helped create is celebrating a decade of carrying out its mission by partnering with the community to do even more.