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Today's News

  • Simpsonville woman takes first at Augusta Futurity

    In the first run of her first Augusta Futurity finals appearance, Libby Bowman proved to be unbeatable.

    Bowman and San Tule Uno marked a score of 221 to win the $100,000 Amateur for 5-6-Year-Olds category of The Augusta Futurity by six points Sunday, Jan. 20, at James Brown Arena. The Augusta Futurity is the largest cutting horse event east of the Mississippi River and runs through Saturday, Jan. 26.

    "It's been very fun," she said. "It's wonderful to win here at Augusta."

  • Deadbeat dads still skirt system

    Dieshell Crittendon said she is tired of hearing the same old story when it comes to the state's effort to make the father of her son pay his child support.

    "I've been dealing with this for 13 years," Crittendon said. "I'm to the point where it seems useless."

    She said the father of her 13-year-old son has been in and out of court for years and even spent time incarcerated for failing to pay his child support.

    "The only time I get money is if he decides to send something in," Crittendon said.

  • Simpsonville F. D. opens third station

    Cheaper insurance rates go hand-in-hand with a faster fire response.

    That means the residents who live off Ky. 148 near Equestrian Estates should not only feel a little safer these days if a fire breaks out, but they should also notice a difference in their insurance bills.

    Simpsonville Fire Chief Walter Jones said although it has taken about four years for the project to go from idea to completion, it took less than a year for the actual construction process of the new station to be completed.

  • Shelby teachers try on boot camp

    Shelby County students with questions about what it's like to be in the Marine Corps now have two teachers upon whom they can rely for first-hand knowledge.

    Construction teacher Walt Wilson and physical education teacher Todd Shipley each spent the past week visiting the Corps' recruit training depot in Parris Island, S.C., as part of an educators workshop designed to give teachers a taste of what it's like to be a recruit.

  • Frosty comes to town

    Thanks to an early morning snow, children at the Dorman Preschool Center were able to spend some time on Tuesday making a snowman.

  • Safeguarding minors

    Beer buyers at a local liquor store this past weekend were given an extra warning against giving the alcohol to minors thanks to the efforts of a group of teens.

    Nine members of Spencer County High Schools' Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) came to Shelbyville on Thursday and placed hundreds of 3-by-4-inch yellow stickers on cases of beer at local alcohol retailers.

    The stickers, which were designed by Mothers Against Drunk Driving, warned that selling or transferring alcohol to minors could lead to up to year in jail and a $500 fine.

  • Law would limit Triple S involvement in historical district

    Planning and zoning commissioners could play a lesser role in setting the city's historic district boundaries if Shelbyville City Council approves a measure next month to abolish some of their authority.

    The legislation comes after a contentious vote last year to cede parts of 10th Street, Bland Avenue and surrounding corridors into the city's roughly 20-block historic district.

  • Community datebook

    Support groups

    Jan. 24 -- Adults with Attention Deficit Disorder meets 7-8:30 p.m. at the Learning Disabilities Association of Kentucky, 2210 Goldsmith Lane, #118, Louisville. For additional information, call the LDA office at 502-473-1256.

    Jan. 28 -- An ALS (Lou Gherig's Disease) support group meets 6 p.m. at Cardinal Hill Rehab Center on Bluegrass Parkway (Bluegrass Industrial Park, I-64 and Hurstbourne Lane) in Louisville. For more information, call 800-406-7702.

    Public can attend

    Jan. 23 -- Shelby County High School's SBDM meeting 3:30 p.m.

  • Triple S selling out

    Recent activity on the part of developers by the Triple S Planning and Zoning Board is a direct slap in the face to every citizen they are supposed to serve. I refer to the regulations regarding buffers and landscaping, adopted only two years ago, which are designed to provide protection to established neighborhoods, shielding them from the unsightly appearance of new developments, as well as to provide shading and green space, lessen the inevitable increases in noise and pollution due to added traffic, and offer at least some beneficial balance against the tide of urban encroachment.

  • Respect the countryside

    A few weeks ago I was the subject of a full page photo essay by your reporter, Nathan McBroom. The positive story was about my fiber business here at Sweethaven Farm which I operate with my husband, Jon. We also raise asparagus commercially. As with most feature stories it dwelt on the relative novelty of turning animal fibers (in our case mohair and wool) into yarn and eventually into wearable products. Understandably there is never enough room to discuss the negative side of farming or any farming enterprise. I thank Mr.