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Today's News

  • They play a new and different game on old field of dreams

    The line drive whistled off the pink bat toward third base, where it scattered the dust when it landed untouched by a fielder. The batter took off toward first base, where a coach was encouraging a runner already there to move along toward second.

    The little hitter stopped at first, and as each successive hitter made contact and followed her, she kept shuttling around the bases, until, after she crossed home, she headed back to first base, where she was detoured by the coach and told she could sit down.

  • What we think: What will you learn this week?

    We know there can be bureaucratic answers to many questions that befuddle us about why things are the way they are, but that does not preclude our asking one question we suspect is on the minds of many this week:
    Why are students in school from now through June 4? Because they are required by state law to have 1062 hours – about 177 days – of “instruction.”

    But we question whether there is any real instruction being given on these last few days.

  • We congratulate: Those students who return to finish

    There are inspirational stories at the end of every school year, tales of students, young and old, who have persevered, diligently fought against odds and overcome adversity.

    In fact, to the dictum of having students “college and career ready” – which we embrace wholeheartedly – we add these examples of students who leave school “life ready.”

  • George N. Busey: 1923-2012

    If you knew George N. Busey, maybe lived near him in Bagdad or interacted with him in the myriad ways he affected Shelby County, then you almost assuredly share today in the sense of loss felt by so many.

    Busey, a longtime farmer known far and wide for his civic mindedness, his love of his community and his character, died Sunday. He was 88.

  • MY WORD: This fight against cancer has incredible allies

    Every day is Cancer Awareness. Cancer is a 365-day, 24/7 kind of carnivore. It is not selecting on whom it will prey. My husband is a two-time survivor. When life is lived by simple pleasures, the enemy can attack. Life as you know it is forever changed. Attached is an open letter to Gary’s physician.

  • Firefighters gearing up for Crusade for Children

    Even with the economy not yet back up to par, fire departments around Shelby County are hoping that the community will remember the children as firefighters continue their collection efforts this week for the 59th WHAS Crusade for Children.

    “We began our collection efforts in Cropper [last week], and we will be continuing in our other areas Wednesday and Thursday,” Bagdad Fire Chief Rusty Newton said.

  • Memorial Day service at Grove Hill draws large crowd

    More than 200 people braved the 90-degrees-plus temperatures Monday to attend the Memorial Day service at Grove Hill Cemetery.

    The crowd proved the spirit of patriotism is still alive and well as they gathered under tents, trees and even stood in the boiling sun to hear speakers, sing stirring songs and listen to the melancholy dirge of bagpipes and the solemn notes of “Taps.”

    After a walking tour of the cemetery hosted by Friends of Grove Hill, led by historian Mike Harrod, the crowd gathered outside the chapel for the service.

  • Shelby County Grand Jury Indictments May 30, 2012

    Eladio Alfaro, 39, of Eden Shell Lane was indicted for first-degree sexual abuse and incest.

    Rebecca A. Manley, 32, of 229 Rancho Drive in Frankfort was indicted for first-degree fleeing and evading police, operating a motor vehicle under the influence of intoxicants, first offense, failure of owner to maintain insurance.

    James Herman Cox Jr., 60, of 1593 Greenland Park was indicted for theft by deception (cold checks) under $10,000 and for being a persistent felony offender.

  • Ishikawa named top paramedic in Shelby County

    Kei Ishikawa, a full-time paramedic at Shelby County EMS since 2003, has been named the county’s paramedic of the year.

    He was honored last week at the Frankfort regional meeting as part of National Emergency Services Week.

    “They pick one person from each county,” Ishikawa said.

    He said he knew he had been nominated but did not know he had won the award until he got to the awards dinner. “I was surprised,” he said.

  • Paramedic/state trooper honored for saving life

    An act of unselfish heroism has not gone unrecognized for a Shelbyville paramedic who made the difference between life and death for another man last year.

    Shelbyville resident Eddie Whitworth, a part-time paramedic at Shelby County EMS and also a Kentucky State Trooper assigned to Post 12, on May 12 received the Lifesaving Medal at KSP’s annual Officer Awards banquet in at the Capitol Plaza in Frankfort.