.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Tipton/Bramblett reunion

  • Datebook: Oct. 10, 2012

    Public meetings
    Shelby County Board of Education meets at 7 p.m. Thursday at the central office on Main Street in Shelbyville.
    Shelbyville Water and Sewer Commission meets at 6:30 p.m. Monday at 1059 Washington St.
    Shelby County Fiscal Court meets at 10 a.m. Tuesday at the Stratton Center, 215 Washington St. Tuesday.
    Triple S. Planning and Zoning meets at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Stratton Center.

  • Shelby County School Board: Board will introduce new student reps

    The Shelby County Board of Education will welcome the new student board representatives at Thursday’s meeting at the board offices, which are at 1155 Main St. in Shelbyville.

    Lauren Greenwell will represent Collins, and Justin Stewart will represent Shelby County. Both are seniors.

  • Election 2012: Shelbyville City Council: Crowded slate largest in decades

    Voters in Shelbyville will have more choices this year than maybe ever when they fill out the ballot on Nov. 6 for the Shelbyville City Council race.

    In May, for the first time since 1998, there was a Democratic primary, with seven candidates vying for six spots, and now for the November election five Republicans are added to the list, more than any election in at least 20 years.

    And that includes all six sitting council members.

  • Old Shelby corporation consolidated

    An organization with roots in tobacco in Shelby County that date back to the early 1920s has consolidated and changed its board of directors and ownership, leaving some former stockholders with questions.

    According to corporation’s Offer To Purchase Stock, sent out to shareholders, the Western District Warehousing Corporation was formed in 1922 as a not-for-profit cooperative among 11 farmers. Throughout its history, the company owned several tobacco warehouses that held auctions for buyers. The last were closed around the end of 2004.

  • From Beech Ridge to Beechridge

    Members of Beechridge Baptist Church have seen a lot of changes in its 200 years, including moving indoors and a name change.

    This Bagdad-area church, located on Benson Pike about 3 miles east of the intersection with KY 395, started nearby its current location when parishioners would gather in the woods on log benches with lanterns hanging in the trees.

    But it persevered, and by 1888 what was then the Baptist Church of Jesus Christ at Beech Ridge had its own building.

  • Shelbyville City Council: Paving project scheduled to be finished during fall break

    Shelbyville’s annual repaving project should start next week, the perfect time as many residents will be leaving town and buses won’t be running because of Shelby County Public Schools’ fall break.

    City Engineer/Public Works Director Jennifer Herrell told the council Thursday during its regular meeting at city hall that Flynn Brothers Contracting is scheduled to begin the work on Monday.

  • MY WORD: One man's story of life and fate

    Herbert T. Riddle from Shelbyville was known as “Herb,” and I want to share his story, which is a story of how fate extended his life. He is 85 years old, but for a twist of change, he might not have reached that age.

    Mr. Riddle joined the Navy and was stationed at Barbara Point Naval Base in Hawaii. He was a tail gunner in a naval fighter plane that was to fly over the oceans and beaches around the islands of Hawaii.

  • What we think: Shelby County should guard against narrow roads

    We have a suggestion for Carl Henry, the new czar of parking in Shelby County.

    Mr. Henry, whose title actually is the county’s road supervisor, was given by Shelby County Fiscal Court the right to set parking regulations on all streets and roads under the county’s jurisdiction.

  • We congratulate: Voter registration growth, but don't stop there

    We were pleased to learn recently that the number of registered voters in Shelby County has increased since we last elected a president.

    That’s always encouraging, and because as our populace grows, we need those of age to do their constitutional – and moral – duty by becoming involved in the electorate process.

    The number of adults in Shelby County who have filed their paperwork to vote in this election is nearly 28,000, which is a strong percentage of those who are eligible.

    That’s the good news, but it also is not enough.