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Today's News

  • Shelbyville City Council: City to look into fireworks ordinance

    The Shelbyville City Council briefly discussed the possibility of a fireworks ordinance during Thursday’s meeting at city hall.

    Council member Donna Eaton brought up the idea after being contacted by a constituent complaining of fireworks being shot late at night.

  • Shelby ACT scores rise, but more work needed

    Shelby County Public Schools got some good news this week with the release of their 2012 junior class ACT scores.

    The district saw improvements in three of four testing categories — English 17.7, math 18.8 and reading 19.1 — with students falling short only in science, from 19.2 in 2011 to 19 in 2012.

    The district still lags the state’s averages in English, 18.4, and science, 19.1, but surpassed the state in reading, 19, and was even with the state in Math at 18.8.

  • Shelby’s burn ban is lifted

    Shelby joined 49 other counties Monday in dropping a countywide burn ban that had been place for the past two weeks.

    On July 11, when Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger imposed the ban, Shelby joined 82 other counties with such a ban.

    On Monday, when he announced he had lifted that restriction on outdoor burning, only 35 counties remained. Of the northeastern and southeastern counties, only Boyd County still had ban in place on Monday, according to a map by the Kentucky Department of Forestry.

  • Social worker convicted of faking child-abuse records

    LAWRENCEBURG – Margaret “Geri” Murphy was sentenced to five years in prison Tuesday morning in Anderson Circuit Court for falsifying child welfare investigations.

    Murphy, 61, a former social services worker, pleaded guilty to nine felony counts and was taken into custody, shackled and placed among about a dozen other inmates as families affected by her actions looked on in delight.

  • Long-tangled Breeden murder case continues to grow in Spencer County

    TAYLORSVILLE – Two inmates sit in two separate prisons in two separate cities in Kentucky.

    One of them admitted to committing a heinous crime, then recanted his story.

    The other has been serving time for that crime since 2008.

    The crime? The murder of Kyle "Deanie" Breeden of Shelbyville in 1998.

    Breeden's body was found in the Kentucky River near the Owen-Henry county line in November of that year.

  • Shelby circuit judge to consider Wills' bid for shock probation

    Jody Wills did not get to make a court appearance Monday to ask for shock probation for a 10-year prison sentence she is serving for stealing hundreds of thousands of dollars from her employer.

    Her attorney, Bill Stewart, stood in for her as she remained incarcerated at Western Kentucky Correctional Complex in Fredonia.

    Stewart asked Shelby Circuit Judge Charles Hickman if he would set a date to allow Wills to ask for shock probation, and Hickman said he would take the request under advisement.

  • VAN STOCKUM: The death throes of an aircraft carrier

    As a result of my service aboard the aircraft carrier USS Wasp during the Battle of the Atlantic in 1941 and 1942, I have developed a great interest in these powerful but vulnerable vessels that changed the course of naval warfare during World War II.

    In previous columns I have written about USS Wasp and USS Hornet. Both of these ships were sunk in the Pacific during the latter part of 1942, but later the larger, modern carriers that replaced them completely destroyed the Japanese fleet.

  • Is there any way to make sense of all that killing?

    A guy buys weapons that Marines typically use. He stockpiles more ammo than the National Guard Armory. He applies his advanced intellect to build a lethal mousetrap in the apartment building where he lives.

    Then he dons armor and opens fire with as semi-automatic assault rifle, killing a dozen people and almost 58 more who are sitting calmly and happily watching the latest episode of Batman at a big-screen movie complex.

    That would seem more like a movie plot within a plot, wouldn’t it?

  • What we think: There’s more to know about taxing districts

    We were pleased to read last week that the special taxing districts in Shelby County – about 18 of them – appear to be well ahead of the state’s curve for operating in the light of public view.

    That Shelby County Fiscal Court is diligent and timely in its collection and forwarding to state officials the budgets for these organizations is a truly significant and important caretaking of our precious tax dollars.

  • We congratulate: Shelby County Public Schools' improved diversity of leadership

    We have on more than one occasion focused on the lack of diversity in leadership of public education in Shelby County and have been frustrated by what we see as a homogenization that does disservice to the diversity of students in our 10 schools.

    It is not our intent to offer a backhanded compliment – because there is work to do on this issue – but we were pleased to see progress in the latest round of hiring of principals and assistants.