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Local News

  • Law would limit Triple S involvement in historical district

    Planning and zoning commissioners could play a lesser role in setting the city's historic district boundaries if Shelbyville City Council approves a measure next month to abolish some of their authority.

    The legislation comes after a contentious vote last year to cede parts of 10th Street, Bland Avenue and surrounding corridors into the city's roughly 20-block historic district.

  • Catalpa'green'? Subdivision a model for open space, say developers

    Residents of Catalpagreen will appreciate the planned neighborhood's "environmentally sensitive design" and enjoy other features that will foster a strong sense of community, developers told Triple S Planning commissioners. Commissioners approved preliminary plans for the 239-unit subdivision, just off Ardmore Lane and U.S. 60, Tuesday night.

    Homes in the residential development will mimic classic 1900s-style architecture, according to plans on file with Triple S, and will be centered around common green space areas.

  • Commissioner talks budgets, CATS

    During his visit to Shelby County on Wednesday, Kentucky Education Commissioner, Dr. Jon Draud, spoke about how proposed education budget cuts would affect Shelby County.

    Draud also announced the state will change the date it administers the CATS battery of tests.

    Draud, who visited Shelby County to participate in Leadership Shelby's "Education Day," said he hopes that the budget shortfall the state faces will not result in budget cuts for the department of education.

  • Simpsonville ordinances address sewers

    Sewers were the focus of three ordinances before the Simpsonville City Commission Wednesday.

    The commission took first reading on an ordinance that would require developers to pay up front when they use the city's engineering firm, allow hotels and motels to pay tap on fees as a commercial rather than residential development, and reduce the sewer board from five members to three.

    City Administrator David Eaton said the city has in the past had problems collecting from developers who had engaged the city's engineer for work on sewer line extensions.

  • Like father, like son? Alleged bandit's dad arrested for bank robbery

    Shelbyville police say they are interested in the arrest of a Shelby County man who was charged with robbing the Central Bank on Harrodsburg Road at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday.

    Kenneth W. Chandler, 47, of Shelbyville, was charged with first-degree robbery and having an expired operator's license.

    According to the report, Chandler is accused of entering the bank, showing a handgun, and demanding money. He escaped with an undisclosed amount of cash before being stopped by police.

  • Apartment fire kills dog

    Shelbyville firefighters battled an apartment fire for three hours Wednesday night that took the life of a local man's dog.

    At about 6:30 p.m., firefighters were dispatched to the Cola Commons apartment complex on U.S. 60 after a smoke alarm sounded.

    When Fire Chief Willard "Tiger" Tucker arrived on the scene, he said he could not see the fire from the outside. But when firefighters made forcible entry into apartment 103, Tucker said they were met with intense heat and black smoke.

  • Cuts could hurt local college

    Kentucky's higher education leadership is calling Gov. Steve Beshear's proposal to slash college funding in the Commonwealth dangerously regressive.

    In a letter, signed last week by each of the state's eight public university presidents and others, educators warned Beshear that 12 percent cuts to the Commonwealth's college system could harm higher education and stall system-wide reform efforts.

  • Eaton files for second term

    Donna Eaton filed earlier this month for a second term on Shelbyville City Council, saying she would run on her strong record of controlling taxes.

    "I think I developed a record this year of keeping taxes down and being a voice for the citizens," she said. "I've worked hard not to raise taxes. I'm very proud of my record."

    Eaton, 52, of Cherokee Drive, voted against raising city property tax rates last year. She also voted against the city's 5 percent tax on alcohol, which was ultimately approved last fall.

  • School Board celebrates 100 years

    For the last 100 years, the direction and management of public schools across the state has been in the hands of locally elected boards of education.

    In 1908, the Kentucky General Assembly determined that if would be best if local folks, not the state government, handled the day-to-day operations of schools.

    This month the Shelby Public School System and school boards across the state are celebrating the 100th anniversary of local school board governance as part of Kentucky's observation of School Board Recognition Month.

  • Get Rhythm: Wright students learn music, rhythm

    Fifth graders at Wright Elementary are tapping, thumping and shaking out a rhythm that is getting them recognition across the county.

    Since the beginning of the school year, music teacher Cherly Gibbons has been creating a class-wide rhythm section by teaching each student in the fifth grade class the basic principles of tempo, rhythm, melody and beat.

    And from the responses that the students have received at two recent concerts, their training is paying off.