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Local News

  • PRIMARY ELECTION 2018: Magistrate races set in 2nd, 6th

    There will be a few new faces on Shelby County Fiscal Court next year.

    Two magisterial seats went up for grabs this year, when second district magistrate Michael Riggs and the sixth district’s Tony Carriss opted to step down from their seats, leaving voters in the Simpsonville and Waddy/Mt. Eden/Southville areas with a decision to make.

    And, on May 22, those voters made their voices heard.

  • PRIMARY ELECTION 2018: Moore, Witt win Sheriff races

    Though voter turnout was just slightly above 20 percent, those that cast their ballots were heard loud and clear regarding their selection for sheriff candidates.
    With 2,117 votes, Timothy ‘Mark’ Moore, was the top choice among Republicans, taking 76 percent of the vote.
    Moore will move on to vie Democratic candidate Gene Witt in the November General election.  Witt took the Democratic nomination with 60 percent of the votes, beating opponent Fred Rothenburger 2,166 votes to 1,443 votes.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD - Board to consider Tentative Budget

    On Thursday the Shelby County Board of Education will consider for approval the 2018-2019 Tentative Budget during its regular meeting at the district’s offices, 1133 Main Street in Shelbyville.

    The board set the draft budget in January.

    Superintendent James Neihof reminded the board at the May 10 meeting that it last reviewed the draft budget in January.

  • Collins’ seniors earn more than $2.5m in scholarships

    As anticipation for graduation day grows, seniors across the district are already earning recognition as celebratory events in honor of their hard work are underway.

  • Hornback, Rothenburger host town hall meeting

    State lawmakers faced their constituents last week during a town hall meeting where Shelby County residents asked a range of questions about education, economics and Kentucky’s future.

    State Rep. Rob Rothenburger (R-Shelbyville) and State Sen. Paul Hornback (R-Shelbyville) addressed topics including education, state revenue, animal welfare and lobbying organizations.

  • Moore to face Witt in General Election

     Though voter turnout was just slightly above 20 percent, those that cast their ballots were heard loud and clear regarding their selection for sheriff candidates.

    With 2,117 votes, Timothy ‘Mark’ Moore, was the top choice among Republicans, taking 76 percent of the vote.

    Moore will move on to vie Democratic candidate Gene Witt in the November General election.  Witt took the Democratic nomination with 60 percent of the votes, beating opponent Fred Rothenburger 2,166 votes to 1,443 votes.

  • Albert L. Minnis, III

    Shelby County lost a community icon on Sunday with the passing of longtime resident Albert “Al” Minnis.

    Born in New Jersey, Minnis relocated back to his father’s home state of Kentucky just a few years after his birth in 1932.

    And he certainly left his mark on his community.

  • Fairgrounds to offer first Spring Fling Day

     The Shelby County A&M Fairgrounds is hosting its first ever Spring Fling Ag Day on May 26.

    “This is a brand new event and there is no admission,” A&M Association Board vice president Carol Hance said.

    Hance said the board is offering the Spring Fling to the public free of charge as a way of saying thank you. “This is a giveback to the community,” she said.

    The event will kick off at 10 a.m. with a flag retirement ceremony followed by a speech from Shelby County Judge-Executive Dan Ison.

  • TRIPLE S PLANNING COMMISSION - Bypass zone changes recommended

    The Triple S Planning Commission on Tuesday gave its recommendation for approval on a zone change request that had many neighboring residents up in arms. 

    A packed house turned out to hear a proposal from Tom McGinnis who owns the 98-acre property on both the north and south of the intersection of Freedom’s Way and LaGrange Road.

    McGinnis said after trying for some time to maintain the farm, he has ultimately determined that the development of a neighborhood would be the best use of the land.

  • Classic event space restored

    Built in the 1880s, the building at 524 Main Street has been home to numerous businesses through the generations.

    Renovations and restorations have brought many of the spaces in the building back to life thanks to owners Ben and Melinda Hardin, who have shown a passion and dedication for the restoration.

    The building has housed an advertising studio, a dance studio and most recently an antique market and now a new event space. 

    Bourbon Kitchen at 524 is open on the first floor. Upstairs, however, a massive space was hiding.