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Education

  • From seniors to alumni

     Saturday was filled with smiles, hugs and tears as nearly 550 students across Shelby County took their ceremonial walk across the stage, venturing from seniors to alumni.

    Collins kicked-off the day of commencement celebrations by recognizing that the class of 2018 has the highest college and career readiness score in the school’s history.

    The events started with the presentation of the Silver Sword awards to Courtney Miller and Kristin Howell.

  • SCHS seniors earn more than $1m in scholarships

    Graduation

    ceremonies

    WHERE:Shelby County and Collins high school gyms

    WHEN: Saturday, 10 a.m. at Collins, and 2 p.m. at SCHS

    MORE INFO: Contact Collins at 647-1160 or SCHS at 633-2344.

    Shelby County High School seniors started their graduation celebrations Wednesday during the schools senior awards night where it was announced that SCHS graduates are starting their path to adulthood by earning more than $1 million in scholarships.

  • Collins’ seniors earn more than $2.5m in scholarships

    As anticipation for graduation day grows, seniors across the district are already earning recognition as celebratory events in honor of their hard work are underway.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD - Budget conversations resume for next step

     Shelby County Board of Education’s meeting Thursday kicked off with numerous recognitions followed by a report from superintendent James Neihof.

    In his report to the board, Neihof prepared the member for a budget update the next meeting, on May 24, when they will hear the tentative budget.

    The budget process has five components: the local draft budget, the state SEEK (Support Education Excellence in Kentucky) rate, the local tentative budget, the local tax rate and, lastly, the local working budget.

  • Awards season starts next week

    Senior awards nights

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD - Amended calendar approved

     The Shelby County Board of Education voted Thursday to amend the calendar for the 2017-18 school year.  Because the district elected to cancel school because of snow one day this year, the last day of school was moved from May 24 to May 25. 

    The district used Non-Traditional Instruction days for the majority of inclement weather dates during the winter.   Students on these days completed their work at home or online using teacher monitored websites.

  • Six Shelby Odyssey teams to advance to Worlds Finals

     After a fantastic showing over the weekend, six Shelby teams have qualified to compete in the World Finals of Odyssey of the Mind.  Collins High School hosted the state competition on Saturday after inclement weather in March forced a relocation from Union.

    Teams from around the state attended and brought their best performances.

    Ten teams from Shelby County competed and coaches say they are proud of their students for their achievements.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD - Amended calendar up for approval

     The Shelby County Board of Education will consider adding a day to 2017-18 school calendar at Thursday’s regularly scheduled meeting.

    Due to a snow day earlier this year, the amended calendar would add one day to district schedule, pushing the end of the year to Friday, May 25.

  • No argument, Collins debate team is tops

    Three Collins High School HOSA (Health Occupations Students of America)students are eager to head to Texas this summer to compete at the International Leadership Conference.

    Juniors Jacob Hisle, Jerry Lancaster and Ryan Waford earned their bid after a first place finish in biomedical debate at the state leadership conference last month.

    Lancaster, the president of Collins chapter, said HOSA is a club open to anyone interested in the health and medical field.

  • Teacher delegate to will come together in Frankfort Friday to contest Bevin’s veto decision

      Just one week after teachers rallied together in Frankfort to protect school funding and their pensions, Gov. Matt Bevin and public education are once again toe-to-toe in the ring.

    Last Monday, thousands of Kentucky teachers joined together at the capital to voice their opposition of a pension bill that puts future teachers into a hybrid cash-balance plan, rather than a traditional pension, and will increase the time they must work before retirement benefits become available.

    Many also voiced their desire to see better funding for public education.