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Business

  • New Business: Maggie Bland’s Gifts

    Address: 604 Main St.,  Shelbyville

    Who we are:  New at Tracy’s Home Furnishings….A shop within a shop!  Named after Tracy’s founders Margaret and Jeptha Bland Tracy, who established Tracy’s 62 years ago, and owned by Mike and Patty Tracy.

  • Old Stone Inn gets new stability

    The Old Stone Inn, an historic landmark in Simpsonville for more than 200 years, bringing in patrons from all over to view its architecture and maybe a bite or two to eat, is getting a tune-up of sorts.

    The restaurant, built in the 1700s, at first an inn and then since the 1920s a restaurant, is going through some long-overdue repairs that its proprietor said shouldn’t affect customers.

  • Jewish opens new women’s health practice in Shelbyville

    If you could design a medical practice that was first and foremost patient-centered and patient friendly, what features would you include?

  • HOLLAND: Navigating the top five retirement risks

    Longer lives and better health translate into longer retirements and new concepts of what retirement should be. Many of today’s retirees view retirement as a time to shift gears but not necessarily to slow down.

    They keep their skills sharp in new job roles or by starting businesses. They continue learning new skills by going back to school as both teachers and students. Some choose to serve on boards of directors or to pursue creative and artistic passions.

  • Amber Oaks’ Windsor honored for leadership

    “I am just really humbled to receive this award,” Dean Windsor, executive director of Amber Oaks, said at a reception Thursday night.

    Anyone who attended the ceremony immediately could get a sense of why Windsor is the 2012 recipient of the Kentucky Assisted Living Facilities Association Leadership Award, because the party had Windsor’s special touch.

  • Shelby couple raises Alpacas

    Ever wondered what the heck an alpaca is?

    If you visit Steve and Karen Kennedy’s alpaca farm, Perfect Timing Alpacas, off Rockbridge Road, you’ll find out.

    The Kennedy’s 13 alpacas, a domesticated species of South American camelid that resemble a small llama, gaze out of their large well-kept enclosure with a mixture of calmness and curiosity.

    “They each have their own unique personalities,” Karen Kennedy said.

    It was a credible statement.

  • Business Briefcase: May 25, 2012

    Artisan cheese company

    launches new Web site

    A family cheese business that opened in Shelby County earlier this year is expanding its reach on the Web.

    HomeTown Farm and Creamery on Vigo Road has launched a new Web site at www.guernseycheese.vpweb.com.

    The company, owned by Tracy Curtsinger, her husband, Mark and their sons, has been marketing through local events but wants to step up the presence for its variety of cheeses.

  • Real Estate deeds: May 25, 2012

    April 2-4

    Rodney W. and Donna Laswell to Frank T. and Meyrose Hensley, Lot 87, Fairway Crossing, Sec. 2, $241,000

    Gary H. and Nancy H. Clark to Jerry L. and Janet M. Sutherland, 3.78 acres on Busey Road, $58,500

    Matthew R. and Emily L. Cecil to Wendy and Dustin Cody Johnson, Lot 2, Hunting Hills, $145,000

    David H. and Gwen A. Lister to Matt Cave, Lot 95, Persimmon Ridge, Phase IV, $397,000

    Walter M. Klicker to Lora Janine Klicker, Lot 34, Meadowbrook No. 1, $107,500

  • Shelby's unemployment plummets in April

    Shelby County’s unemployment statistics took another significant surge downward in April to 5.8 percent, the second-lowest rate in the state.

    That figure declined from 7 percent in March and, more significantly, 2.7 percent from the 8.5 percent rate of April 2011.

    Only Woodford County (5.1 percent) had a lower rate in April, but, among neighboring counties, both Spencer and Trimble counties has more precipitous drops. Spencer fell to from 10.1 in April 2011 and 8.0 in March to 6.5, and Trimble was down 10.5/9.2 to 7.6.

  • Shelby economic development officials push for work-ready status

    Shelby County is well on its way to becoming the fifth community in Kentucky to be designated a Work Ready Community.

    What does this mean?

    Only that the workforce in the community is more prepared than other communities, said Libby Adams, executive director of the Shelby County Industrial and Development Foundation.

    What’s more, it’s a tremendous draw for companies that are looking for a place in which to locate, she said.