.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • Pottery shards

    Pottery shards and flint flakes. You look for them, don’t you? I do. They are like movie tickets for the latest film, the one that’s already been shown. A film that seems to halt the flow of time long enough to look at the product of its passage. What has gone before us is a long, captivating film. And there are theaters everywhere.

    The Persian Gulf

  • In my last column, I described the launch of British Spitfires from the aircraft carrier USS Wasp (CV-7) in the Mediterranean for the relief of besieged Malta, 580 miles distant.

    From my battle station, I had observed Jerry Smith, Canadian Spitfire pilot serving with the British Royal Air Force, make a miraculous landing back on Wasp after discovering that his auxiliary fuel tank, needed to reach his destination, was not functioning properly.

  • On May 8, 1942, I was a Marine captain in command of the Marine Detachment on the aircraft carrier USS Wasp (CV 7).

    We were in the Mediterranean for the second time, carrying 47 British Spitfires on each occasion. They had been hoisted aboard at Greenock, on the River Clyde in Scotland. I had recorded my first impressions of the Spitfire in my Marine Journal.

  • For many years, Jeffrey Bracken thought he was just clumsy. He’d walk into door frames and excuse it as not paying attention, or he’d brush off his driving mishaps as just being a bad driver.

    “My wife kept saying ‘Jeff, there’s something wrong,’ but I just kept putting it off,” said Bracken, a history teacher at Shelby County High School.

  • For many years, Jeffrey Bracken thought he was just clumsy. He’d walk into door frames and excuse it as not paying attention, or he’d brush off his driving mishaps as just being a bad driver.

    “My wife kept saying ‘Jeff, there’s something wrong,’ but I just kept putting it off,” said Bracken, a history teacher at Shelby County High School.

  • Bothané

    When Susanne and I had visited Brittany in France in 1958, Jean-Michel Dunoyer de Segonzac picked us up at Quimperlé and drove us to their beautiful chateau Bothané, five miles distant. This had been the home of the great-grandfather of his wife Guillemette, Theodore Ducos, who had been Ministre de la Marine et des Colonies [Minister of the Navy and of the Colonies]. Guillemette had also informed me that it had been the headquarters of a German admiral after France had been overrun in World War II.

  • By Ronald Van Stockum, Jr.

    Don’t step there!

    Yikes! Look down where you stand. Walk with care. Trilobites are everywhere!

    Well, at least here in Kentucky.

    Pick up a rock in your stream. Chances are that it contains trilobites – or maybe just parts of them. That’s the problem. We want it all now.

    A big, beautiful, completely whole trilobite in three parts – the head (cephalon), thorax and tail (pygidium).

  • Reggie and Cheryl Van Stockum attended the wedding of our French cousin Gwénaelle de Benaze and Andrew Hosk on Sept. 15, 2018. It was held at Couffé, site of beautiful Contrie, the ancestral home of the Charette family, 25 miles northeast of Nantes.
    They then drove to La Basse Motte, which had been the chateau of Reggie’s great grandfather, General Baron Athanasius de Charette.
    However, before describing their visit to La Basse Motte, I consider it appropriate to  provide a summary of  its history.
    A fabulous tour

  • BY Ronald R. Van Stockum, Jr.

    YIPEEI-YO-KIY-YAEEI!

    That’s Gene Autry in the 1935 science fiction western serial entitled, “The Phantom Menace.”

    He was one of the first actors in movie serials to play himself. You see, Autry wasn’t a trained actor. And he couldn’t ride very well either.

    But director William Witney could.

    And he taught Autry how to handle a horse.

  • My wife, Susanne de Charette Van Stockum, granddaughter of hero of France, General Baron Athanasius de Charette met her cousins Jean-Regis de Lauriers and his wife Armelle de Charette de Lauriers on one of our early trips to France.

    They had been gracious in hosting dinners for us at the prestigious Interallie in Paris and at beautiful Contrie, in Couffé, the ancestral home of La Maison de

    Charette de la Contrie.