Today's Sports

  • Post 37 hosting weekend tourney

    There will be some familiar faces this weekend at the Shelbyville American Legion Post 37 baseball tournament at Collins High School.

    Post 37, the defending Kentucky state champions, will host three teams in Ashland, Owensboro and Paducah. Post 37 beat Ashland in last year’s state championship game and has battled with Paducah for years, while Owensboro is a less familiar foe.

  • Post 37 splits with Indiana teams

    A fast start and a slow start brought mixed results to the Shelbyville American Legion Post 37 baseball team as they split a pair of games Saturday beating Brooksville, Ind. 11-1 and falling to Madison, Ind. 8-7 in nine innings.

    Post 37 broke open a 1-1 game with Brooksville in the third inning with six runs.

    “We finally started hitting the ball and put some things together to get the win,” Post 37 coach Roy Bailey said.

  • Park hit hard by flooding

    From baseball to golf to fishing and camping, the recent rains have wreaked havoc with the activities and conditions at Clear Creek Park.

    With rising water over the dam at Lake Shelby access to fishing and camping grounds is closed.

    “It’s about the worst I have ever seen back there, it’s closed,” assistant parks director Jeff Long said. “The area back by the dam looks pretty bad. Up in front of the park [by the golf course] water is right by some of the greens.”

  • Wiley forgoes summer play for...

    For the first time in his life Zac Wiley isn’t spending his summer playing baseball.

    While other local college players are honing their skills this summer, Wiley has spent his time re-habbing an injured hamstring suffered this spring playing for Bellarmine University.

    “It’s been really weird,” Wiley said. “I haven’t played a baseball game in four months now. I have had a lot of free time, for sure.”

  • Young takes Big I title

    Riding a hot putter and ignoring the bad weather, Shelby County’s Lilly Young captured the championship of the 47th Trusted Choice Big I state tournament qualifier at Oxmoor Country Club Tuesday.

    Young, who will be a junior at Shelby County High School this fall, shot a 72-77–149 to edge Kie Purdom of Lexington who shot a 77-73-150. Young’s short game on the greens helped her to hold off a furious comeback from Purdom.

  • Brown Pelicans seen near...

    The Brown Pelican is an Endangered Species and one of two pelican species in the United States.

  • Herring Gull: Not your average...

    The Herring Gull is 25 inches long with a wingspan that is 58 inches wide and weighs 2.5 pounds and is a fairly common winter resident around the Falls of the Ohio in Jefferson County, as well as the lake region of western Kentucky.

    I also saw one that was in a rather large flock of migrating Ring-billed Gulls in Shelby County in March of 2014.

    They generally appear in our commonwealth by early October and are gone by mid-May.

  • Pectoral Sandpiper can linger in...

    The Pectoral Sandpiper is common in Kentucky during migration and occasionally lingers into early winter but is extremely rare in mid-winter and summer.

    However, they occur most often west of the Cumberland Plateau and sometimes pass through as early as March 4 and as late as Dec. 30. They are one of many shorebirds that migrate from the Arctic to the Antarctic and then back again.

  • The nocturnal Rough-legged hawk

    I have seen the Rough-legged Hawk locally many times in the winter. Even though it is 21 inches long, has a wingspan that is 53 inches wide and weighs 2.2 pounds, they have small feet.

    So whenever I see a large hawk sitting high in a tree on a very small branch, I give this bird special attention with my binoculars and quite often it will be a Rough-legged Hawk that has migrated down from the North Country. They also tend to hover a lot while hunting.

  • The large Ferruginous Hawk is...

    There have been two sightings in Kentucky, one on Dec. 28, 1979 and the other one was Dec. 29, 1985 and both of them were in Henderson. Their breeding range is from southern Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba down through Montana, Wyoming, the western Dakotas, southern Idaho, eastern Oregon on down into Nevada, Utah, Colorado and eastern Nebraska. The Ferruginous Hawk winters south of these areas on down halfway into Mexico.