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Recreation

  • Small, fast Green-winged Teal visits over the winter
  • The largest gull is a rare visitor to Kentucky
  • A northern nomad, the Eastern Grosbeak can be unpredictable
    The Evening Grosbeak is the nomad of the North and the mountains. The bird seems to wander unpredictably, often in large noisy flocks, and while it may be common in a region one year, it could be totally absent the next.
  • Although primarily out west, the this pelican will frequent Kentucky
    The American White Pelican has been recorded in Kentucky, primarily from Louisville southwestwardly and usually as a winter visitor during mild winters. However, a good friend of mine has seen them on Lake Barkley and Kentucky Lake in the spring and also in autumn.
  • A duck that likes to blend in
    John James Audubon found the American Black Duck breeding on lakes along the Mississippi River as far up as the confluence with the Ohio River as well as in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Today this 23-inch-long bird with a 35-inch-wide wingspan’s breeding range is northern Michigan, northern Wisconsin, eastern Minnesota, and all of northeast Canada. It winters from Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio South to southern Mississippi, southern Alabama, and southern Georgia.
  • Swainson’s Warbler is not like most warblers
    The Swainson’s Warbler is unlike almost all of the other warblers in so many ways. Look for a large potbellied warbler with a short tail. It is drab brown above, buff below, more pale on the throat and breast and has a slightly chestnut cap and long, broad eyebrows. This certainly makes it the least colorful member of the warbler family.
  • Vesper Sparrow, bird of mystery
    The Vesper Sparrow was named by the well-known late naturalist, John Burroughs, who thought that this sparrow sings more beautifully in the late evening amid advancing shadows.
  • Look down, not up for the Worm-Eating Warbler
    The Worm-eating Warbler is a very differently acting bird than many other members of the warbler family. Most of them are rather excitable and nervous birds of the treetops. This bird, however, is rather quiet and spends most of the time on the ground or within a few feet of it, walking, not running, and sometimes creeping along a tree trunk like a Brown Creeper or a Black-and-white Warbler. It also has a distinct habit of searching and poking into clusters of dead leaves to extract spiders and insects and is extremely fond of the larvae of moths.
  • Cerulean Warbler is very un-warblerlike
    If the Cerulean Warbler is sitting in a very tall tree, which is where they are usually seen, and the background is a blue sky, then it will be very difficult to see this bird because its coloration is sky blue above with an even brighter blue on the crown. However, it does have white below and a dark blue narrow breast band and side streaks on a somewhat big belly.
  • Cerulean Warbler is very un-warblerlike
    If the Cerulean Warbler is sitting in a very tall tree, which is where they are usually seen, and the background is a blue sky, then it will be very difficult to see this bird because its coloration is sky blue above with an even brighter blue on the crown. However, it does have white below and a dark blue narrow breast band and side streaks on a somewhat big belly.