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Opinion

  • As chairman of the Shelby County Board of Education, I have an interesting and unique view of the Shelby County Public School (SCPS) system. It is an eye-opening experience.

    I am amazed at the dedication and commitment that the school’s administration and employees show for our students. Through the first full year of Unbridled Learning, the state’s accountability model, they simply got down to business and went about the tireless work of improving.

  • Shelby County has the honor of being the final resting place of two of Kentucky’s foremost pioneer frontiersmen, Gen. Benjamin Logan and Col. James Knox. They both lie in peaceful repose in the Logan family cemetery on a bluff overlooking Bullskin Creek on what was the Benjamin Logan farm. They played key roles in history, and our county needs your help to preserve their heritage.

  • We hope you are not falling victim to the irresponsible rhetoric flowing around the launch last week of the Affordable Care Act. Since registration for anyone needing health insurance opened Oct. 1, misinformation and carefully constructed lies seem to have become part of the “instructions” some intend to be read and followed.

  • We’re glad to see that there is a new, full-time director of the Shelby County Animal Shelter. That the new leader, Leon Federle, has prior experience at the shelter is an added bonus.

    This is not to diminish the 6-year, interim tenure of Rusty Newton. The shelter has grown and been effective under Mr. Newton’s leadership, and he certainly has set a well-developed and easily followed trail for Mr. Federle to lead the county’s animal control efforts.

  • The author Tracy Gayle uttered some frightening words the other day: Nobody reads anymore, she said. They have their phones in front of them. She is in position to see this literary loss far more clearly than most of us: She teaches kids to read for her living and tries to sell the novels she writes for her soul.

    As reality-pounding as that assessment was, it was only the last of a series of jackhammers that have cracked my soul in recent days.

  • In the often-maligned world of public education, aren’t we feeling a balmy, refreshing breeze of good news blowing across Shelby County these days? Haven’t years passed since we last felt so much positive energy involving the education of our students?

  • There is uncertainty in the land today. Our mighty government has struck out.

    That means different things to each of you. It means something entirely different to me today than it did in 1995, when such stupidity ruled.

    That’s because I realized that a shutdown could have meant my son wouldn’t get paid this week.

  • Why was I marching on Aug. 24, in Washington, D.C.? The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom took place in 1963, five years before I was born. I grew up in a very small racist town Shelbyville, so I take civil rights to heart.

    Being an African-American female, the 1963 civil rights March on Washington, DC left a bittersweet feeling. We still have to realize the dream. Some of the same issues and racism civil rights leaders marched for in 1963 still exist today.

  • Welcome to the marketplace, Tegrant Industries. We’re glad to have you join our burgeoning base of support manufacturers to feed the state’s high-powered automotive industries.

    We know your parent company, Sunoco, has a strong working relationship in Kentucky, but we’re glad you chose Shelby County to plant your $12 million stake and hire 51 people. We trust those 51 will come from our collection of zip codes.

  • It’s a question that first resonated in my life 40 years ago and now has roared back with full force:

    Why do people allow their children to play football?

    It’s a question I asked myself when I first became a father, and now that the game has grown far more powerful than its rules and equipment can manage, I hear it amplify from a whisper to a shout:

    Why do parents allow their precious children to play tackle football?

  • We might be appearing to gloat if we were to claim a great victory in the decision last week by Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway’s office that would require the Cabinet for Health and Family Services to release its investigative records about the life of Jackleen Lane.

    Certainly The Sentinel-News pursued those records as it sought to understand how a 15-year-old girl would be missing from home for three days without any questions being asked and then to be found dead, having drowned in remote area of Clear Creek.

  • Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty spoke some simple but vitally important words near the close of last Thursday’s meeting of the city council by saying that his city is drafting an ordinance it soon will introduce to advance the discussion curbside garbage and recycling for its residents.

    There remain many hurdles in place, but Mr. Hardesty’s announcement shows that the leadership of the city quickly is moving toward a visionary decision for the good of all its residents.

  • The local newspaper has published wedding announcements longer than all of us have been alive. In my days with the newspaper from 1971-1998, I can remember publishing details about the bride’s gown and flowers, the musical selections, and even a list of all the parties or showers that were held in honor of the happy couple.

    However, an announcement from 1867 would have raised a few eyebrows: “...The bride, who our readers all know, is not mere ‘skin and bones’…”

    Who was the bride? Who wrote the article?

  • Everybody wants to “pound nails,” but the Shelby County Habitat for Humanity also needs volunteers to serve on our committees. Strong committees ensure our affiliate can sustain long-term house building in Shelby County. Everyone has a talent, and your talents would be welcome to serve in some capacity on one of our committees.

  • Let’s begin with a cliche: Age is simply a number. Or another: You’re only as old as you feel.

    Or, as Mitch Albom suggested in his quirky The Time Keeper: If we didn’t measure time, would we know that it was passing?

    Those are thoughts at the top of my quickly crowding cranium because I recently had one of those landmark birthdays that give us pause and has us studying the mirror and dreading the horizon – and chanting it’s only a number, it’s only a number.

  • About three months have passed since the body of teenager Jackleen Lane was found in a remote, private area of Clear Creek in Shelbyville, and we continue to get the impression that many would wish that our questions about how she came to be there would be buried along with her remains.

  • Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer said last week that he expects farmers in the state to be producing industrial hemp by next spring.

    My, has that economic engine turned quickly and driven this machine, which would provide a new, indigenous cash crop for our state, to market with very little delay.

  • If a picture is worth a thousand words, video evidence must warrant a book. It's a book the Obama administration recommended to members of Congress and the American people last week as the president and those in his circle made the plea for military strikes against the Syrian government in the wake of gas attacks they allegedly carried out on citizens of that country.

  • For the record, the Shelbyville-Shelby County Parks Board did all they could to make the women's gym a reality and keep it up and going. It bothers me that people do not ever give at least a little credit when credit is due.

    For those that do not know the whole story of Curves and the FAC Women's Gym, this is what really took place. I as parks director, in 2012, was approached by an individual and told that the owner of Curves was planning to close it in December. The individual asked if we would take it over and move the equipment to the FAC.