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Opinion

  • If Rudy Wiesemann was vying for the irony award with his My Word ("No need to save the planet,” May 1), he should win it hands down. Because after grandly stating that he could not let "unreferenced misstatements go unrefuted," and that he "prefer[s] to rely on facts to expose errors, myths, [and] mistakes," he then proceeds to lay out paragraph after paragraph of unreferenced misstatements, logical errors, easily debunked myths and outright mistakes.

  • Give me a “S.” Give me a “C.” Hip, Hip, Hooray, Shelby County!

    We’ve learned that Shelby County’s most exuberant, tireless and faithful cheerleader has announced her retirement. Shelby County’s strongest advocate, Duanne Puckett, is retiring this month from her role as Public Relations Coordinator for Shelby County Public Schools.  Leaving the role of the face and often the handshake of Shelby County’s education system marks the close of just one chapter in Duanne’s lifetime of service to this community.

  • We understand that expansion of the Medicaid plan as part of the Affordable Care Act is seen as a political football, a topic to be kicked back and forth across a field of ideology with not a whole lot of regard for the players involved.

    We also admit that we don’t have the sufficient grasp of either the process or economics to reinforce the decision last week by Gov. Steve Beshear to expand the rolls and open up the possibility that perhaps 300,000 more Kentuckians can have access to health insurance.

  • We were pleased to see that the Shelby County Board of Education will hear this week a formal proposal to provide teachers a pay raise in the coming fiscal year.

    Teachers are under fire continually – as is our educational system in general, it would seem – and many of them are taking those bullets for barely enough money to make a decent living.

  • I was heartened to hear members of the Shelbyville City Council may make adult-provided or adult-present minors' use of illegal substances a city as well as a county and state penalty (“Adult hosts of teen parties may be fined,” May 20). This I hope you will pass.

    However, I encourage you to change the minimum fine to $1000 for the first offense, with multiples of that for later offenses. Here is why.

  • When I visited the Education Center @ Cropper on May 2, I chatted with a junior, Jose Menendez, about the online algebra course he was taking. He switched gears and reminded me that we first met when he was a student at Painted Stone Elementary. He vividly remembered the history lesson I shared about the Painted Stone settlement and even the rock painted red that I brought with me.

    “You’re ‘Miss Bug,’ right?” he asked.

    He was right.

  • Tell the truth: If you are a parent, you thought twice about sending your child to school on Tuesday morning.

    You looked at the satellite images of the approaching weather system that had laid waste to miles and miles of homes in Oklahoma. You looked at the darkening skies in the west. You thought about families whose children were huddled in a school not built to withstand the right cross from nature’s most fearsome force.

  • A steamy Sunday afternoon in early August, 1963. Crosley Field, the old baseball park in Cincinnati, and the Pirates are in town to play the Reds in that long lost treasure called the “Sunday doubleheader.”

  • We were dismayed last week when there was a meeting of Shelby County Fiscal Court that did not include mention of the decision by the group’s Legislative Committee to step away from the prospect of creating curbside garbage and recycling pickup for residents.

    Surely the magistrates realize that, based on new legislation passed this spring in the General Assembly, they will become responsible for signing off on the budget of the county’s 109 Board, the entity that is responsible for garbage and recycling in the county.

  • What a great idea the Shelby County Community Foundation has initiated by creating a plan to help nonprofit groups help themselves.

    We always have been troubled by any group that seems to exist only for grants and handouts from corporations. We appreciate those who do the work, build themselves and are rewarded for that effort.

  • NOTE: Chris Hauck, a former resident of Shelby County, was one of the participants in the memorial jam concert on Saturday to honor late former music teachers Ernie Threlkeld, Susie Saunders and Mel Owen. He wrote this on the Facebook after Threlkeld’s passing last fall. Hauck shared it for publication.

     

  • In response to my article titled (“Is public education at a crossroad?” My Word, April 10), Rev. Jerry Stephenson suggested that I had “left out some important points as it relates to charter schools and the value they could bring to Kentucky” (“In support charter schools,” My Word, April 17).

  • NBA player Jason Collins made headlines and history last week when he became the first active male player from one of the big four team sports to openly announce he was gay. Of all the adjectives used to describe the announcement,  “courageous’ seems to be the most oft-repeated. I disagree for two reasons.

  • I suggest each of you save money, save your valuable time and save birds – even if not all of you would like to do. I hope to suggest to you as to how this can be accomplished in such a way that also hopefully will make you proud.

  • Both stories appeared in the same position on the front page of the daily newspaper. The headline sizes were about the same, the impact of the stories nearly identical.

    So it takes no degree in journalism to determine that editors believed each story to be almost equal in “weight” with the other. After all, any story at the top of a front page of an American newspaper is deemed to be important simply by geography.

    Yet these two stories were hardly identical, hardly equal and hardly of the same importance.

  • The somewhat scary but mostly frustrating situation that evolved on Monday at Collins High School – when the school received a “security breach” that ultimately earned the students an extra day before end-of-school tests and an early ride home – brought to light an issue that we have feared could be key as the school became settled in its location and routine.

  • Some remarkably talented and inspirational people will get a wonderful compliment this weekend, when former students of Ernie Threlkeld, Susie Saunders and Mel Owen will play a jazz concert in tribute to these fabulous music teachers, who passed away in recent years.

  • We get ourselves worked up about topics of important public debate, but when reality reaches out and slaps our cheek with the sting of the fragility of our very core, we can’t help but feel a big tear rolling down our public face.

    That’s because today we can almost see through downtown Shelbyville, its center, decimated in March by the tragic and awful fire that consumed three buildings, again struck by a fire that on Sunday beheaded the beautiful and marvelous old Chatham House on the 600 block of Washington Street.

  • We are so pleased that Shelby County again will have a face in the Kentucky Derby.

    Jockey Jon Court is back for his second ride in three years – after decades of having been left off the backs of the 20 3-year-olds entered each year – and we think that’s a sure bet for everyone.

    It’s not so much like in football or basketball or even golf, when the athlete’s hometown gets a mention on national TV, but it’s just such a magnet for additional community pride.

  • I have for many years enjoyed Horace Brown’s weekly articles on birds. It brings me no pleasure to correct what are significant factual errors in his article by such a passionate proponent of exploring the world of nature. I don’t suppose for a moment that I will be able to change his mind, but refuse to let unreferenced misstatements stand unrefuted (“The Evidence for Global Warming,” March 6).