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Opinion

  • Welcome to the marketplace, Tegrant Industries. We’re glad to have you join our burgeoning base of support manufacturers to feed the state’s high-powered automotive industries.

    We know your parent company, Sunoco, has a strong working relationship in Kentucky, but we’re glad you chose Shelby County to plant your $12 million stake and hire 51 people. We trust those 51 will come from our collection of zip codes.

  • It’s a question that first resonated in my life 40 years ago and now has roared back with full force:

    Why do people allow their children to play football?

    It’s a question I asked myself when I first became a father, and now that the game has grown far more powerful than its rules and equipment can manage, I hear it amplify from a whisper to a shout:

    Why do parents allow their precious children to play tackle football?

  • We might be appearing to gloat if we were to claim a great victory in the decision last week by Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway’s office that would require the Cabinet for Health and Family Services to release its investigative records about the life of Jackleen Lane.

    Certainly The Sentinel-News pursued those records as it sought to understand how a 15-year-old girl would be missing from home for three days without any questions being asked and then to be found dead, having drowned in remote area of Clear Creek.

  • Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty spoke some simple but vitally important words near the close of last Thursday’s meeting of the city council by saying that his city is drafting an ordinance it soon will introduce to advance the discussion curbside garbage and recycling for its residents.

    There remain many hurdles in place, but Mr. Hardesty’s announcement shows that the leadership of the city quickly is moving toward a visionary decision for the good of all its residents.

  • The local newspaper has published wedding announcements longer than all of us have been alive. In my days with the newspaper from 1971-1998, I can remember publishing details about the bride’s gown and flowers, the musical selections, and even a list of all the parties or showers that were held in honor of the happy couple.

    However, an announcement from 1867 would have raised a few eyebrows: “...The bride, who our readers all know, is not mere ‘skin and bones’…”

    Who was the bride? Who wrote the article?

  • Everybody wants to “pound nails,” but the Shelby County Habitat for Humanity also needs volunteers to serve on our committees. Strong committees ensure our affiliate can sustain long-term house building in Shelby County. Everyone has a talent, and your talents would be welcome to serve in some capacity on one of our committees.

  • Let’s begin with a cliche: Age is simply a number. Or another: You’re only as old as you feel.

    Or, as Mitch Albom suggested in his quirky The Time Keeper: If we didn’t measure time, would we know that it was passing?

    Those are thoughts at the top of my quickly crowding cranium because I recently had one of those landmark birthdays that give us pause and has us studying the mirror and dreading the horizon – and chanting it’s only a number, it’s only a number.

  • About three months have passed since the body of teenager Jackleen Lane was found in a remote, private area of Clear Creek in Shelbyville, and we continue to get the impression that many would wish that our questions about how she came to be there would be buried along with her remains.

  • Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer said last week that he expects farmers in the state to be producing industrial hemp by next spring.

    My, has that economic engine turned quickly and driven this machine, which would provide a new, indigenous cash crop for our state, to market with very little delay.

  • If a picture is worth a thousand words, video evidence must warrant a book. It's a book the Obama administration recommended to members of Congress and the American people last week as the president and those in his circle made the plea for military strikes against the Syrian government in the wake of gas attacks they allegedly carried out on citizens of that country.

  • For the record, the Shelbyville-Shelby County Parks Board did all they could to make the women's gym a reality and keep it up and going. It bothers me that people do not ever give at least a little credit when credit is due.

    For those that do not know the whole story of Curves and the FAC Women's Gym, this is what really took place. I as parks director, in 2012, was approached by an individual and told that the owner of Curves was planning to close it in December. The individual asked if we would take it over and move the equipment to the FAC.

  • The Affordable Care Act – love it, hate it or don’t know much about it – will become part of our world and our lives next month.

    The adoption of national health-care reform, an effort to provide medical insurance to Americans who can’t afford it or don’t have access to it and to ensure that coverage is not denied to others because of age or pre-existing conditions, is not embraced by everyone, we understand.

  • Every year when the calendar strikes Sept. 11, the memories of that awful day 12 years ago come blasting back to the forefront of our consciousness.

    There is nothing that can change the images of airplanes flying into skyscrapers and the Pentagon or the understanding that evil forces wanted to destroy Americans and upset our way of life. It was indescribably horrible and unfathomably confounding. Why would citizens of another country want to sacrifice their lives to create terror and panic?

  • Wow, have you looked through the hundreds upon hundreds of winners from Shelby County who brought home ribbons from the Kentucky State Fair?

    A list culled from those posted by fair organizers is so voluminous that it takes several editions and pages of the newspapers just to provide the basic info. That process continues this week and into next as the names roll and roll.

    Grand champions, sweepstakes winners, reserve champions and enough ribbons to cover all the walls of a large room were handed out.

  • We are trusting that the maddeningly long and purposefully political process of realigning our state’s legislative and judicial districts truly is complete. Our leaders say it is. But they said so in 2011, as well, when they were supposed to have this done in the first place.

  • Wen we learned last week that Shelby County Public Schools Superintendent James Neihof planned to ask the school board to approve a .5 of a cent compensating rate on tax increases, our first reaction was that this was an astounding accomplishment in this day of expanding educational needs and contracting resources.

  • When I was a little boy, my favorite book was The Giving Tree, by Shel Silverstein. Perhaps like most children, I was always saddened by the slow disappearance of the tree into the insatiable worldly desires of the young boy. The apples and branches and trunk all find their way into the black hole of the boy’s ambition.

    “I want money, a house, a boat.” Take from my body, the tree says. I am told that the story is a parable for the selfless giving of a parent, a friend, a Christ, a God who is willing to sacrifice in the name of love and affection.

  • Having spent, like many boys and girls in Shelby County’s history, my formative years in keen observation of cows, I am continually amazed by the devotion families have to them, how delicately they treat them and care for them. Sometimes I have to wonder if some among us of have converted to Hindu, so revered are their bovine gods and goddesses. At least cows aren’t allowed to roam the streets anywhere this side of New Delhi.

  • Despite The Sentinel News’ reporting that the Shelby County Judicial Center employees have fallen out of grace with the Centenary United Methodist Church next door (Church: No more park,” June 28), we believed the relationship was a good one. We were very grateful and appreciative of the church’s generosity in offering convenient and safe reserved parking spots for full-time state employees. No such thought was given by the powers that be who supervised the planning of the new judicial center.