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Opinion

  • Lesson No. 666,666 that I am becoming a curmudgeon: Halloween costumes.

    Have you been to a costume store this fall looking for the best way to deck out your little ones for the annual Halloween sugarfest?

  • An amazing decision could be made on Monday night in the small, partially-in-Shelby County city of Pleasureville, where the city commission will take up second reading of a proposed Fairness Ordinance.

    You may recall that this is a measure suggested to address specific non-discrimination procedures for housing and employment, among others, based on race, religion, creed, color or sexual orientation.

  • The Cabinet for Health and Family Services has responded as we expected: going to court in Shelby County to prevent you from knowing what you have a right to know about how well it protected Jackleen Lane.

    The Cabinet does not want to conform to a judgment in September by the office of Attorney General Jack Conway that it violated state Open Records laws by denying to release to The Sentinel-News records concerning its oversight of Ms. Lane.

  • When you visit historic sites – particularly those that dealt with the founding and discovery of our great nation – do you conjure what that place must have been like for the persons who first trod in your footprints? Have you wondered about the hardships they experienced, how they first encountered the vistas you so simply accessed?

  • When it comes to schools and families, the word “redistricting” can be as daunting for parents as “final exam” can be for students. Those few letters can signal for some a difficult task ahead, an uncertain future and, perhaps, a lot of blood, sweat and tears to come.

  • Two great lessons of strength played out in Shelby County last week, taught by the golden examples of a pair of teenagers who were unafraid of a bright life and making a salient point.

    First there was 17-year-old Ashley Hilger, who not only executed the admirable but awful task of telling her parents that she was being molested but also doing so in front of a press conference that included TV lights and cameras as part a lawsuit her family had filed against employees of the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services.

  • In answer to Linda Humphress’ question regarding why Sen. Mitch McConnell would be opposed to the Affordable Care Act (“Health care reform, Letters to the editor, Sept. 25):

    He is well aware of the harmful effects of the act and wishes to protect his constituents. We all know our health care as it stands now needs some improvements. The ACA misses the mark by a wide margin, and Senator McConnell expressed that opinion.

  • I am one of a number of active members in the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1179 and in Governor Isaac Shelby Sons of the American Revolution in Shelbyville.

    Two fellow World War II veterans are Ed Myles and Roy Hardesty. Ed flew on a B24 on bombing missions over Germany, and Roy flew on a B25 making bombing flights on Japanese positions in China. Both were gunners on their planes.

  • There is a confession that I must scrape from my heart and address publicly for the first time. I do so with temerity and humility, because this is not something you or I like to admit. I ask your acceptance and beg your tolerance, because only recently did I come to understand this blemish on my character.

    I come from a heritage of mixed colors.

    There, I’ve said it, and it wasn’t easy. I don’t even think my parents have realized this, that my history is not as clear as I had grown up believing.

  • Friday could be a big day for the sad legacy of Jackleen Lane, but we hesitate to raise false hopes. The emphasis must fall squarely on the word “could.”

  • The filing deadline for the 2014 elections remains three weeks away, but we are inspired to see early-bird candidates popping out of political corners to suggest that there could be races in May and November. It’s a trend we would like to see continue at an explosive growth rate.

  • After reviewing the articles regarding North Central District Health Department and the Shelby County Board of Health (“Spending Your Tax Dollars: 2 agencies, 1 leader,” Sept. 27), I find it necessary to address several issues raised.

  • As chairman of the Shelby County Board of Education, I have an interesting and unique view of the Shelby County Public School (SCPS) system. It is an eye-opening experience.

    I am amazed at the dedication and commitment that the school’s administration and employees show for our students. Through the first full year of Unbridled Learning, the state’s accountability model, they simply got down to business and went about the tireless work of improving.

  • Shelby County has the honor of being the final resting place of two of Kentucky’s foremost pioneer frontiersmen, Gen. Benjamin Logan and Col. James Knox. They both lie in peaceful repose in the Logan family cemetery on a bluff overlooking Bullskin Creek on what was the Benjamin Logan farm. They played key roles in history, and our county needs your help to preserve their heritage.

  • We hope you are not falling victim to the irresponsible rhetoric flowing around the launch last week of the Affordable Care Act. Since registration for anyone needing health insurance opened Oct. 1, misinformation and carefully constructed lies seem to have become part of the “instructions” some intend to be read and followed.

  • We’re glad to see that there is a new, full-time director of the Shelby County Animal Shelter. That the new leader, Leon Federle, has prior experience at the shelter is an added bonus.

    This is not to diminish the 6-year, interim tenure of Rusty Newton. The shelter has grown and been effective under Mr. Newton’s leadership, and he certainly has set a well-developed and easily followed trail for Mr. Federle to lead the county’s animal control efforts.

  • The author Tracy Gayle uttered some frightening words the other day: Nobody reads anymore, she said. They have their phones in front of them. She is in position to see this literary loss far more clearly than most of us: She teaches kids to read for her living and tries to sell the novels she writes for her soul.

    As reality-pounding as that assessment was, it was only the last of a series of jackhammers that have cracked my soul in recent days.

  • In the often-maligned world of public education, aren’t we feeling a balmy, refreshing breeze of good news blowing across Shelby County these days? Haven’t years passed since we last felt so much positive energy involving the education of our students?

  • There is uncertainty in the land today. Our mighty government has struck out.

    That means different things to each of you. It means something entirely different to me today than it did in 1995, when such stupidity ruled.

    That’s because I realized that a shutdown could have meant my son wouldn’t get paid this week.

  • Why was I marching on Aug. 24, in Washington, D.C.? The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom took place in 1963, five years before I was born. I grew up in a very small racist town Shelbyville, so I take civil rights to heart.

    Being an African-American female, the 1963 civil rights March on Washington, DC left a bittersweet feeling. We still have to realize the dream. Some of the same issues and racism civil rights leaders marched for in 1963 still exist today.