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Opinion

  • I got what I have been whining for: a blizzard. Louisville reported a bit over 10 inches in the storm we got Friday and Saturday, March 7-8.

    Friday evening I saw lightning. I thought I'd lost my mind to snow-hallucinations, but local weather bloggers confirmed thunder and lightning were part of the storm. Snow came down faster than the salt trucks could spread salt. I suppose that makes sense as far as the science of snow-salt-road ratios go. But I wanted salt, brine, everything, even kitty litter, spread out in great quantities as I went home Friday.

  • Many of this county's citizens spent weeks amending the conditional use regulations for agriculture. In January, the Board of Adjustments and Appeals threw out these rules in favor of the Louisville Cemetery. It is a slap in the face of our citizens.

    In February, Chuck Hickman rules against Triple S Planning and Zoning in favor of New Estates Farms, a development planned on the Shelby/Jefferson county line, a decision overly biased toward Jefferson County's development interests.

  • The article in the Sentinel-News on February 15, 2008, concerning the request by the Louisville Cemetery Company (a.k.a. the Louisville Cemetery Association) for a conditional use permit to put a commercial cemetery business on Eminence Pike contained very misleading statements.

  • Your recent article on the repeal of the sin tax was dead on; giving the tax already collected back to the merchants is nothing more than a windfall for them.

    It is my understanding that merchants raise the price of an item to cover a tax. Therefore, what they paid to the Revenue Cabinet was NOT out of their pocket. There is no way they can return it to the customers that actually paid it (I being one).

  • Today, when people think of American independence, they think of the fourth of July. But labeling a single day of independence is not easy.

    Most people don't look at a calendar and see March 5 as any sort of holiday, but the tragic events that occurred 238 years ago today played an important role in American history.

  • Just another cemetery. Doesn't affect me. Wanna bet!

    It does affect you! It affects your property value, your rural environment, and your Shelby County lifestyle. And here's why everyone in Shelby County should be concerned.

  • With the writer's strike finally over, the constant stream of reruns that has plagued broadcast television for the last several months will soon come to an end. And while polls have shown that TV watching has decreased by up to 40 percent due to lack of fresh material, in the weeks to come, ratings will likely return to normal as network and cable stations start pumping out a new batch of shows and storylines.

  • A worker told me recently that the road department is cutting down a very large tree about half-mile mile back on the left from U. S. 60 on Webb Road traveling North.

    I'd love think there is a valid reason for this lovely old tree to come down. It's not dead, I know. I pick up trash on Webb Road most days and when the summer temperatures reach into the 90s that tree provides the only shade I have for about half a mile. Welcome relief, I can tell you. I have come to think of that tree as a friend and it's sad to think it may be cut down.

    Connie Kuhn,

  • Women Against Gambling Expansion (WAGE) held a rally in the State Capitol Rotunda on Tuesday, Feb. 19 to express the opposition of women across Kentucky to expanded gambling. Our fight is against those who want to take advantage of people in Kentucky, enticing them with the lure of easy money. Our fight begins by telling the truth and calling this a fight against expanded gambling, not gaming. Games are things like checkers or a good basketball contest. Gambling involves money with more losers than winners.

  • I haven't watched the TV show but I've seen the advertisements where a man appears to be hooked up to a lie detector machine and a game show host is asking him if he could cheat on his wife and no one would ever know, would he do it?

    Problem is, his wife and a rather large TV audience are all watching to see what his answer will be.

    Talk about being in the hotseat.

    I imagine most men would rather endure eating a plate of worms or at least swimming in less shark-infested waters.

  • The Shelby County Optimist Club would like to give thanks to those who helped with our annual Christmas dinner. Special thanks to the Multi-Purpose Community Action Agency, the Sentinel-News, Kroger, donations from Kentucky Tent Rental, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Masters, Mr. and Mrs Bobby Mackey, Pauline Clements, Billy Jeffries and the late Ophelia Martin.

    With the help of over 40 volunteers and Optimist members, we were able to feed over 350 people.

    Jean Glore, president

    Shelby County Optimist Club

  • On the evening of January 3t, the Triple S Board of Adjustments and Appeals turned my world into shambles. By a majority vote, the Board approved a Conditional Use Permit that will allow the for-profit Louisville Cemetery Association to put a nearly forty acre cemetery around two sides of my seven acre farm and my house. It will engulf me!

  • On behalf of the Kentucky Baptist Convention's Committee on Public Affairs, I want to express our strong opposition to the effort to expand gambling by bringing casinos to our Commonwealth. We realize that the current state budget situation makes gambling expansion an attractive short-term fix to problems. However, we believe the benefits touted by the gambling industry are more imagined than real.

  • For those of you who have been in withdrawal after the Sentinel-News message boards came down a few months ago, good news - they're back.

    Starting this week, readers will be able to post comments at the bottom of news stories on the Sentinel-News' website, www.sentinelnews.com.

    There are a few changes from the way the message boards were set up in the past.

    First, you have to register an email address to post comments. Nothing complicated or threatening. We do not want to know your bank account number or Social Security number. Just an email address will do.

  • February is Black History Month, probably as good a time as any to let Skip know I'm sorry even if the offense committed against him occurred nearly 50 years ago.

    The memory is as vivid as the permanent stain put on our society by the way black people have been treated for decades.

    My rural Kentucky hometown was probably little different than most other small communities across the South in 1959.

  • Food is our nation's best buy, a better buy than health care and about one-half the cost of housing.

    According to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, by the middle of February, the average American has earned enough to pay their food bill for the year. It takes only 10.9 percent of your disposable income to get the best, most affordable, safest, abundant supply of food in the world. The United Kingdom gets close at 11.2 percent, France at 18 percent, all the way up to the Sudan at 60.5 percent. Imagine having to spend half of your paycheck for food.

  • The cost of food in America remains affordable. According to the latest statistics by the USDA Economic Research Service, families and individuals currently spend, on average, just under 10 percent of their disposable income for their food supply for the entire year. It only takes about 37 days to pay for our annual food supply.

    We must work much longer to earn disposable income for health and medical care (52 days), housing and household operation (62 days) and federal taxes (77 days) for the entire year.

  • This letter is in response to an agreed settlement reached in September 2007 between the United States Environmental Protection Agency, the Commonwealth of Kentucky, and the East Kentucky Power Cooperative.

  • The new year started with a bang. Several bangs. In the first week of 2008, I was offered, and happily accepted a staff writer position with the Sentinel-News. I received my journalism degree from Butler University in Indianapolis a few years ago, and as most journalism majors do, I was struggling to find a job in the field.

    A week after getting the good news, more celebration was in order, as I walked the aisle and married my longtime sweetheart, Stephanie. The following week we were enjoying an incredible honeymoon in Italy.

  • I read with great interest the article "Kentucky School Boards A Century of Local Leadership", which appeared in the Wednesday, January 16, 2008, edition of the Sentinel-News. I found it surprising to learn that our school boards have been in existence for 100 years. However, I found the comments from some of our board members even more surprising.