.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • Our current weather conditions demand that we rethink some of our fall chores.

    Fall lawn and tree fertilization should come later this year then normal because of the drought conditions. An application of high nitrogen now would only burn up what little green grass you may have and force trees to work more then they should under stressful conditions.

    Even if you irrigate the lawn and water is not an issue, you still want to hold off because our lawns also share space with the roots of our trees and shrubs and will have access to the applied nitrogen.

  • I am 9 years old, and I would like to tell everyone about our Shelbyville Recycling Center and the nice people who work there. I am learning about "going green" in home schooling. We started recycling, and we took a tour of the recycling center. We saw what we could recycle and what we couldn't recycle. A couple of weeks later, we took our recyclables to the same place and they truly seemed happy to see us again. They were so helpful. We drove up, and they even helped us unload our car!

  • As a person with a vested interest, I have but three words to the Simpsonville City Council about its consideration of building a downtown along the U.S. 60 corridor: Please be careful.

    Though I grew up about a mile outside its borders, for the first two decades of my life I went to it or through Simpsonville for just about everything. I called Simpsonville home, even if my address was Rural Route 2, Shelbyville.

    Always affectionately known as Simp, this was place of, you might say, simplicity: quaint, quiet and quintessentially personal.

  • On Saturday a week ago, my wife, two guests from Kansas and I had the opportunity to take a tour of a Saddlebred horse farm with our guide, Charlie Kramer, executive director of Shelby County Tourism Bureau. Charlie was very knowledgeable and was patient answering all our questions about the farm, the horses and the history of Shelbyville and made us feel he truly wanted us to learn.

  • Last weekend, my wife and I loaded up the front-wheel drive sleigh and headed to the country for one of those long-standing, old-fashioned family traditions that we just started - picking apples.

    It was the perfect afternoon for a relaxing, quiet day on the farm. The sun was shining, a light breeze was blowing, and the temperature was a comfortable 80 degrees.

    So we headed to Huber Farms, which is just outside the Louisville metropolitan area in the rolling hills of Floyd's Knobs, Ind., to spend the day with Joe Huber and his family and about 30,000 of our closest friends.

  • This only could have happened in a town of the size and style of Shelbyville, one with spirit and soul.

    And it's a quintessential reason why you might always have preferred Mayberry to Manhattan (even if there's no doubt that you are a BIG fan of the Big Apple).

    This scene could be cast and played in many places across the country and the world, to be sure, but few visitors would believe it could happen.

    Some would snicker. Some would guffaw. Most would shake their heads.

  • After the trauma subsided over our decision to accept the offer of the O'Brien Team for our 78-year-old family business [Pearce Motors], I began to think about the future of American manufacturing in general and the three remaining American car manufacturers in particular.

  • You leave your old Kentucky home as a teenager and move hundreds of miles away. You get a college education in a mid-sized town and move to a larger one. You know people and work with them, and you have family members nearby. You feel comforted if not content.

    Work takes you hundreds more miles away, to a bigger, sprawling city that is far more plastic and soulless than you can imagine.

  • A letter writer (Sentinel-News, Sept. 24) said to check the candidate's voting record. Well, I'd already been there and done that. Now you need to ask the incumbent Rep. Brad Montell why he voted as he did on the following:

  • We want to thank everyone who participated in the benefit for Tom and Vicky wise. Words cannot express the appreciation that we have. From the donation of the facility, all of the individuals and businesses that donated food, money, and items for the auction and all of the volunteers working the fish fry, this would not have been possible without you. In our time of need, it is a wonderful feeling to know that there are so many people and businesses that are willing to lend a helping hand. That's what made this benefit so special. We were asking for help, and everyone we asked responded.

  • So I'm sitting in the upstairs bedroom of my home two Sundays ago, getting ready for my first full day at work in Shelby County.

    I feel the building sort of shaking, the wall beside me vibrating, the wind whistling and, out the window, I see oak trees bending like palms.

    The wind had been blowing hard all morning, but this was ridiculous.

    My wife and I had been glued to the Weather Channel for several days, getting our fix of Hurricane Ike's battering of the Gulf Coast, so TV was tuned when we sprang from our bed to see to see what was the matter.

  • We seem these days to have too much government without any common-sense approach to correct anything.

    Both parties in Congress keep making laws that favor corporations, which don't hesitate to put money where it's to their benefit. Their own needs are met and executed in a way that leaves no possible way a man trying to start a small business has a chance.

  • Some of you will know the name, a few will recognize some semblance of the face and too many will remember things from my younger days I wish you would forget.

    But, for better or worse, I am home.

    You may have read recently that the Sentinel-News was getting a new editor and that the guy was a native who was returning from nearly four prodigal decades in the newspaper business.

    And today I want to re-introduce that man to you: Please meet me.

  • September is Ovarian Cancer awareness month. The American Cancer Society predicts 22,000 women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer in the United States and that 15,000 women will die from this disease. In Kentucky, new cases of ovarian cancer each year are around 320. It is the 5th most common cancer among women, and it is the most deadly of all gynecologic cancers. The five-year survival rate for all women is approximately 46%. However, survival rates improve greatly to 93% if it is diagnosed at an early stage before it spreads. Many women have not symptoms until the cancer is advanced.

  • Having just returned from a delightful -- and exhausting -- trip to Chicago, I spent Monday evening pondering the feasibility of temporal displacement.

    Time travel may be the stuff of fiction -- at least for now -- but there is no doubt that the clock is moving too fast.

    As a result, we often try to cram too many activities into a short amount of time, thinking we can "beat the clock." Even if we succeed, it beats us as well.

    "Beat" is an accurate term to describe my physical state when I got home from the airport Monday afternoon.

  • The political campaign season is in full swing and again I find myself asking that you do your best to elect the best candidate.

    If you have not already, you will soon begin to get calls telling you how you should vote. You have and will continue to be told on TV and by radio how you should vote. You may be told by a family member, friend or most anyone how you should vote. You may even be told by your newspaper how you should vote. I would like to tell you how you should vote, but I won't.

  • Walt Reichert has left his post here as the editor of The Sentinel-News to sit on a bucket and feed chickens.

    Some may call it retirement, but Walt would say it's a promotion - a reward for his many years as a teacher, writer and journalist.

    Enjoy it, sir. You've earned it.

    When I came to work here at the paper over four years ago, Walt was already dreaming of the day that he could forsake the daily grind and spend more time tending to the chickens, ducks, cows, and vegetables on his hobby farm near Simpsonville.

  • As the grandmother of three granddaughters, Cayla and Caty Hawkins and Devan Brooks, who have or are now playing volleyball for Shelby County, I can say I never enjoyed a volleyball game as much as I did on Aug. 21.

    First was the great response to wearing pink shirts for the Volley for the Cure for the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. Even the Anderson County volleyball team had pink ribbons in their hair.

    Secondly, was the beautiful voice of George Cottrell singing our National Anthem.

  • I wanted to take this time to applaud the accomplishments of the faculty, staff, students, parents and PTO members in our community.

    Recently at Painted Stone Elementary School, a new initiative was launched. "Pennies for Pride" offers students the opportunity to collect money to donate each month to charity. Last month the money went to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society to help those in our community and state living with certain blood cancers.

  • Regarding letters in the August 13 Sentinel-News entitled, "Thanks Mitch" and "Misleading Ad."

    Reading these two opinions is like following Dorothy down the "yellow brick road." Surely these two authors do not expect anyone to seriously buy this "hoopla."