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Opinion

  • Sometime during the last couple of decades, the exact moment seems to have gone unrecorded, a witch toiling over a boiling caldron somehow threw in the right mix of eye of newt, cats whiskers and the dander of Cousin It to conjure up a spell that suddenly made Halloween very important.

    What always had seemed to be a fun little candyfest that captured the attention of small children, their parents and their dentists for, oh, maybe two weeks now has become some sort of monthslong homage to all things scary and saccharine.

  • I've followed the All-America Selections for as long as I can remember. It was always a designation that my father trusted, and we often trialed the plants in our own family garden the year before their introduction.

    Some of the more memorable plants include "Purple Wave" petunia, "Magestic Giants" pansy mix, and the "Profusion" zinnias.

    Sure, there were memorable vegetables in the past, but it seems as though the AAS is responding to the increase in vegetable gardening interest by including more vegetables then ever each year.

  • When you were in school, for some of you the eight most frightening words of your day were, "OK, students, it is time for English class."

    In fact, just reading that sentence caused some of you to shiver. Others, however few and far between, actually enjoyed English class. You thrived on learning vocabulary words, and loved to diagram sentences. You labored over every paper to make sure each phrase was as sharp as the pencil that wrote it.

    This article is for those weird folks in the second category. But we'll allow the rest of you to look over our shoulders.

  • Sometime during the last couple of decades, the exact moment seems to have gone unrecorded, a witch toiling over a boiling caldron somehow threw in the right mix of eye of newt, cats whiskers and the dander of Cousin It to conjure up a spell that suddenly made Halloween very important.

    What always had seemed to be a fun little candyfest that captured the attention of small children, their parents and their dentists for, oh, maybe two weeks now has become some sort of monthslong homage to all things scary and saccharine.

  • With the mess this country is in under a Republican president and the mess our ex-Republican governor left the state in, why would we want to turn the country over to more Republicans? President Bush led us into a war in Iraq, which has bled this country dry. Would we be in as bad of shape with the Wall Street meltdown if we had not spent all our money on an un-winnable war? In the last eight years I have watched my retirement fund melt down to less than half what it was when Bush took office. I know the rest of you are hurting also. Had Bush, Sen. Mitch McConnell and Sen.

  • Recently my close friend from New York City discovered he had a serious medical problem and needed extensive surgery. The hospital had two specialists on staff who would be able to perform said surgery. One of the surgeons had about 8 years of medical surgical experience and the other about 35 years of experience and knowledge. My friend, realizing the seriousness of the medical problem and the threat to his life and his future, took his time to evaluate both doctors.

  • Most of us are aware of the financial troubles that have been plaguing Wall Street during the last several months.

    The failures and mergers of major financial institutions along with the big drops and brief gains of the stock market during the last several weeks have caused many Americans to become concerned about the state of their investments and retirement funds.

  • Our current weather conditions demand that we rethink some of our fall chores.

    Fall lawn and tree fertilization should come later this year then normal because of the drought conditions. An application of high nitrogen now would only burn up what little green grass you may have and force trees to work more then they should under stressful conditions.

    Even if you irrigate the lawn and water is not an issue, you still want to hold off because our lawns also share space with the roots of our trees and shrubs and will have access to the applied nitrogen.

  • I am 9 years old, and I would like to tell everyone about our Shelbyville Recycling Center and the nice people who work there. I am learning about "going green" in home schooling. We started recycling, and we took a tour of the recycling center. We saw what we could recycle and what we couldn't recycle. A couple of weeks later, we took our recyclables to the same place and they truly seemed happy to see us again. They were so helpful. We drove up, and they even helped us unload our car!

  • As a person with a vested interest, I have but three words to the Simpsonville City Council about its consideration of building a downtown along the U.S. 60 corridor: Please be careful.

    Though I grew up about a mile outside its borders, for the first two decades of my life I went to it or through Simpsonville for just about everything. I called Simpsonville home, even if my address was Rural Route 2, Shelbyville.

    Always affectionately known as Simp, this was place of, you might say, simplicity: quaint, quiet and quintessentially personal.

  • On Saturday a week ago, my wife, two guests from Kansas and I had the opportunity to take a tour of a Saddlebred horse farm with our guide, Charlie Kramer, executive director of Shelby County Tourism Bureau. Charlie was very knowledgeable and was patient answering all our questions about the farm, the horses and the history of Shelbyville and made us feel he truly wanted us to learn.

  • Last weekend, my wife and I loaded up the front-wheel drive sleigh and headed to the country for one of those long-standing, old-fashioned family traditions that we just started - picking apples.

    It was the perfect afternoon for a relaxing, quiet day on the farm. The sun was shining, a light breeze was blowing, and the temperature was a comfortable 80 degrees.

    So we headed to Huber Farms, which is just outside the Louisville metropolitan area in the rolling hills of Floyd's Knobs, Ind., to spend the day with Joe Huber and his family and about 30,000 of our closest friends.

  • This only could have happened in a town of the size and style of Shelbyville, one with spirit and soul.

    And it's a quintessential reason why you might always have preferred Mayberry to Manhattan (even if there's no doubt that you are a BIG fan of the Big Apple).

    This scene could be cast and played in many places across the country and the world, to be sure, but few visitors would believe it could happen.

    Some would snicker. Some would guffaw. Most would shake their heads.

  • After the trauma subsided over our decision to accept the offer of the O'Brien Team for our 78-year-old family business [Pearce Motors], I began to think about the future of American manufacturing in general and the three remaining American car manufacturers in particular.

  • You leave your old Kentucky home as a teenager and move hundreds of miles away. You get a college education in a mid-sized town and move to a larger one. You know people and work with them, and you have family members nearby. You feel comforted if not content.

    Work takes you hundreds more miles away, to a bigger, sprawling city that is far more plastic and soulless than you can imagine.

  • A letter writer (Sentinel-News, Sept. 24) said to check the candidate's voting record. Well, I'd already been there and done that. Now you need to ask the incumbent Rep. Brad Montell why he voted as he did on the following:

  • We want to thank everyone who participated in the benefit for Tom and Vicky wise. Words cannot express the appreciation that we have. From the donation of the facility, all of the individuals and businesses that donated food, money, and items for the auction and all of the volunteers working the fish fry, this would not have been possible without you. In our time of need, it is a wonderful feeling to know that there are so many people and businesses that are willing to lend a helping hand. That's what made this benefit so special. We were asking for help, and everyone we asked responded.

  • So I'm sitting in the upstairs bedroom of my home two Sundays ago, getting ready for my first full day at work in Shelby County.

    I feel the building sort of shaking, the wall beside me vibrating, the wind whistling and, out the window, I see oak trees bending like palms.

    The wind had been blowing hard all morning, but this was ridiculous.

    My wife and I had been glued to the Weather Channel for several days, getting our fix of Hurricane Ike's battering of the Gulf Coast, so TV was tuned when we sprang from our bed to see to see what was the matter.

  • We seem these days to have too much government without any common-sense approach to correct anything.

    Both parties in Congress keep making laws that favor corporations, which don't hesitate to put money where it's to their benefit. Their own needs are met and executed in a way that leaves no possible way a man trying to start a small business has a chance.

  • Some of you will know the name, a few will recognize some semblance of the face and too many will remember things from my younger days I wish you would forget.

    But, for better or worse, I am home.

    You may have read recently that the Sentinel-News was getting a new editor and that the guy was a native who was returning from nearly four prodigal decades in the newspaper business.

    And today I want to re-introduce that man to you: Please meet me.