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Opinion

  • The Leadership Shelby class visited local industrial centers as part of the comprehensive community education program. The group visited five businesses throughout the day and entertained a presentation by Ron Crouch from the Kentucky Office of Employment and Training.

    The group began the day with presentations by the Shelby County Chamber of Commerce and the Shelby County Industrial & Development Foundation. Class member Stacy Tipton expressed her amazement at the breadth of the Industrial Foundation’s interaction with the community.

  • As the executive director of the Shelby County Public Library, I must clarify some of the statements made concerning the library in the What We Think editorial (“Foundation needs to tweak program,” Nov. 27).

  • According to Laffer and Associates, the fastest-growing areas in the U.S. are Raleigh, N.C., Austin, Texas, Las Vegas, Nev., Orlando, Fla., Charlotte, N.C., Phoenix, Houston, San Antonio, and Dallas. All are low-tax, business friendly states. Areas such as Cleveland, Detroit, Buffalo, N.Y., Providence, R.I., and Rochester, N.Y., are among the highest population losers.

  • The man was telling me about his recent afternoon of Christmas shopping. He bemoaned the parking lot at a mall, saying he had to drive around 20 minutes just to find a place and hike a long way in the frozen wind to get inside the mall. There he found the muddled masses, which brings this question: Is the very word “mall” an adaptation of “masses all?”

    He was frustrated and indignant. “I hate dealing with all of that,” he said. Or perhaps words more colorful and to the point.

  • The uniforms hadn’t been washed from Collins High School’s wonderful weekend of state football success before members of another team from the school were filling social media with complaints about not being able to compete for a national championship in their sport.

  • Dear Santa:
    We have a special request we want to whisper in your ear this holiday, and this is a gift you really don’t have to deliver until next year.

    Please, Dear Santa, send us some candidates for public office.

    We were making a list and checking it twice, and, although we sometimes know who is naughty or nice, we didn’t find many new names of people who have filed to run for public office next year.

  • What Browning Becherer and the Collins Titans accomplished on a very cold Saturday afternoon is so heartwarming that surely it could have been an episode of Friday Night Lights, a sequence from Varsity Blues and, of course, an ultimate curtain call for Remember the Titans.

    These Titans surely won’t be forgotten for a few generations, and Becherer, the walk-on hero of the production, won’t forget his day as long as he can remember.

  • A few weeks ago we examined piece by piece the structure of taxing districts in Shelby County. We endeavored to explain to you how, why and when your tax dollars are being collected and being spent.

    We looked at 16 taxing districts that draw dollars from residents of Shelby County. At least four of them – all fire districts – aren’t based in the county but remain subsidized by you.

  • Shelby County and Shelbyville are in the process of addressing state-mandated changes in their liquor sales ordinances. The Shelbyville City Council had a special called meeting on Tuesday afternoon to have a first reading on its changes, and in August Shelby County Fiscal Court hired an outside firm to help wade through what Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger termed as “substantial study and consideration.”

  • Collins High School is returning to the Class AAAA Kentucky football championship game, and we heartily commend the Titans for that accomplishment.

    Never to our knowledge has any athletic team from the county competed for back-to-back titles. Shelby County’s girls’ golf team certainly has contended in an open tournament, and Caterina and Gabby Karas have brought great individual honor by winning four consecutive state cross-country titles for Collins.

  • I’ve always been the type who likes to let the Christmas season unwrap, slowly and beautifully, like the perfectly conceived and packaged gift, whose undressing leaves us rapt in anticipation. Or maybe it’s like savoring a 7-course gourmet meal, with its full aromatic elegance to be absorbed slowly.

  • For decades the Shelby County Community Foundation, carrying on and expanding on a tradition established by the generosity of a lone man, Moses Ruben, has provided non-profit funding – often life-sustaining dollars – to non-profits across Shelby County.

    We couldn’t be more pleased with the group’s efforts to generate endowments, provide funds and then underwrite the existence of so many who do so much with so little. We heartily applaud the foundation’s goals.

  • Brenda Jackson has made many contributions to Shelby County, and she has won honors – including the state's Rev. Martin Luther King Citizenship Award earlier this year – for those efforts, which have included nearly a quarter of a century on the Shelby County Board of Education.

    We were not surprised, then, to learn that Ms. Jackson had played a significant role in expanding our community’s efforts to provide a Thanksgiving meal to those who weren’t in position to have one.

  • Anyone older than about 3 can recite the history of Thanksgiving. Newcomers to America got together with the natives in 1621 and celebrated a harvest. About 240 years later, Abraham Lincoln established it as a holiday on the last Thursday of November. About a hundred years ago a guy named Gimbel suggested that a parade that day would be the opening of the Christmas season. About 100 months ago, somebody named Walton decided that you didn’t need Santa’s arrival in that parade to get the merchandising ball rolling and keep it going all day and all night and all weekend.

  • Well as you know the end of 2013 is upon us, which means an end of another tax year. So who needs a tax deduction or would just like to give out of the goodness of their heart? Well, I have a great idea for you.

    How about a gift to the Shelby County Parks Foundation! A non-profit 501c3 local foundation that supports your parks and nothing else?

  • The Sentinel-News featured two articles from Jonna Priester, both on the  front page and opposite editorial page, that seem to show she is disappointed and doesn’t understand the reluctance of Pleasureville or any other city to embrace the “Fairness Ordinance” ("Fairness bid failes to get a 2nd," Nov. 6).

  • In the future columns, if I test the limits of the First Amendment and the latitude of this newspaper, I expect someone to slap my hand. I have, however, promised the publisher that I will not mention political parties, elected officials still in office or candidates for office.

    Last week we discussed some things that shaped my conservatism. Probably events during the Great Depression are most vivid.

  • In the middle of a Friday afternoon in November a sixth-grade student came bursting through the gymnasium doors at Simpsonville Elementary and moved quickly to speak to our teacher, who was standing in front of the stage and watching us play basketball or generally run That someone came into the gym distracted us to a point of pause, because it was so out of the ordinary, but what happened after that let us know why the extraordinary was in order, even if for a while we didn’t understand truly.

  • The recent Kentucky High School Feedback Report appears to show that educators in Shelby County are doing something right.

    Certainly we were encouraged to see that our graduates are outpacing the state in attending college, and we were overwhelmed to understand that more than twice as many of them actually are sticking around for a second year and hopefully beyond.

    The most recent data, for the 2011-12 school year, wasn’t broken down between our two high schools, but about 270 of the 429 students from the county who graduated went on to college.