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Opinion

  • Brenda Jackson has made many contributions to Shelby County, and she has won honors – including the state's Rev. Martin Luther King Citizenship Award earlier this year – for those efforts, which have included nearly a quarter of a century on the Shelby County Board of Education.

    We were not surprised, then, to learn that Ms. Jackson had played a significant role in expanding our community’s efforts to provide a Thanksgiving meal to those who weren’t in position to have one.

  • Anyone older than about 3 can recite the history of Thanksgiving. Newcomers to America got together with the natives in 1621 and celebrated a harvest. About 240 years later, Abraham Lincoln established it as a holiday on the last Thursday of November. About a hundred years ago a guy named Gimbel suggested that a parade that day would be the opening of the Christmas season. About 100 months ago, somebody named Walton decided that you didn’t need Santa’s arrival in that parade to get the merchandising ball rolling and keep it going all day and all night and all weekend.

  • Well as you know the end of 2013 is upon us, which means an end of another tax year. So who needs a tax deduction or would just like to give out of the goodness of their heart? Well, I have a great idea for you.

    How about a gift to the Shelby County Parks Foundation! A non-profit 501c3 local foundation that supports your parks and nothing else?

  • The Sentinel-News featured two articles from Jonna Priester, both on the  front page and opposite editorial page, that seem to show she is disappointed and doesn’t understand the reluctance of Pleasureville or any other city to embrace the “Fairness Ordinance” ("Fairness bid failes to get a 2nd," Nov. 6).

  • In the future columns, if I test the limits of the First Amendment and the latitude of this newspaper, I expect someone to slap my hand. I have, however, promised the publisher that I will not mention political parties, elected officials still in office or candidates for office.

    Last week we discussed some things that shaped my conservatism. Probably events during the Great Depression are most vivid.

  • In the middle of a Friday afternoon in November a sixth-grade student came bursting through the gymnasium doors at Simpsonville Elementary and moved quickly to speak to our teacher, who was standing in front of the stage and watching us play basketball or generally run That someone came into the gym distracted us to a point of pause, because it was so out of the ordinary, but what happened after that let us know why the extraordinary was in order, even if for a while we didn’t understand truly.

  • The recent Kentucky High School Feedback Report appears to show that educators in Shelby County are doing something right.

    Certainly we were encouraged to see that our graduates are outpacing the state in attending college, and we were overwhelmed to understand that more than twice as many of them actually are sticking around for a second year and hopefully beyond.

    The most recent data, for the 2011-12 school year, wasn’t broken down between our two high schools, but about 270 of the 429 students from the county who graduated went on to college.

  • You don’t find many important public meetings when Kerry Magan doesn’t show up.

    Whether it’s a land usage plan before the Triple S Planning Commission, a zoning decision by a legislative body, the development of a new trash and recycling center, a historical matter or even simply a humanitarian matter involving a local resident, Mr. Magan is both omnipresent and omni-involved.

  • Several weeks ago, U.S. Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) made a statement at the Plymouth Community Renewal Center in Louisville regarding his support for the restoration of civil rights to felons who have completed their sentences, including the right to vote.  In a political climate rife with ugly partisanship and disagreement, this call for common-sense legislation aimed at removing unjust and immoral limitations on participatory self-government resonates with people across the ideological spectrum for several obvious reasons.

  • More than 20 years ago, a friend handed me a paperback and told me that it would be the most amazing thing I ever had encountered.

  • Fairness has a unique definition to all who profess to embrace its precepts. Some of us take fairness for granted – thinking every situation is or at least should be fair to every individual – and others simply fight for expanding its meaning from a posture of both perceived and endured injustice and social awakening.

  • What a great bragging point for all of us: Kentucky’s fastest runners in high school cross country come from Shelby County.

    We were not surprised that Gabriela Karas sprinted off with her third consecutive Class AA title during the meet Saturday at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington. Neither were we in the least stunned that she did so by breaking her 5-kilometer course record – 17 minutes, 39.04 seconds – and beating her nearest rival by nearly a minute.

  • This fall, Congress has an important opportunity to create jobs and grow the economy by passing a long-term, comprehensive Food, Farm and Jobs Bill. The Farm Bill impacts every American, every day by providing a wide range of programs that strengthen our nation.

  • Opinions expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of this publication or any organization to which I have belonged. I hold a degree in economics from Duke. I do not profess to be an expert. An economist, to me, is someone who spends years, maybe a lifetime, studying some arcane numbers and comes up with a theory no one else understands.

  • Oh, Pleasureville.

    I can’t say after Monday night’s meeting that I’m surprised, really. Disappointed, but not surprised. And that, in itself, is a fairly sad commentary on what happened.

    You see, you had a chance to do something good. You had a chance to do something that really matters. You had a chance to lead the way in Henry County – and a corner of Shelby County.

    But you sat on your hands, looking quietly and somewhat awkwardly at the table while the motion to approve a Fairness Ordinance died for lack of a second.

  • It is easy in today’s busy world to overlook and even under-appreciate the role agriculture plays in our communities, and the Leadership Shelby Class of 2014 embarked last month on its first field session affectionately known as Ag Day.

  • There are not enough ways to say thank you to the veterans who have served our country and continue to serve. Veterans Day, to be celebrated on Monday, gives us a chance to create ceremony for this purpose, but we don’t think it ever could be enough.

    Set aside the long-term commitment to preserving our life, liberty and freedom. Set aside our veterans’ efforts to rid the world of danger and nuisance. Set aside the overall public safety of the United States.

  • Dire weather forecasts and government intervention created a scary pattern of miscommunication this Halloween. You didn’t know when and if you should send out your children to trick or treat, and you looked to your elected leaders to make that parenting decision.

    Thus when public judgment stepped into personal arena there, was more bad information flying around than witches and ghosts in the blustery breezes. What we had here was a frightening inability for the right persons to make the right decisions.

  • We were maybe 7 years old when we first heard that elegant accent, something so foreign as to be indefinable to our uncultured, tone-deaf ears. All we knew was that this wasn’t the flat twang heard all around Shelby County, which in those days was dead to any sort sound of elsewhere.

    But those of us who hung around Simpsonville soon learned that the words and dialect of a friend’s mother were in fact the King’s English, perfected in the British Isles and brought to America to sing for us on just about any occasion.