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Opinion

  • I read and liked your Sentinel-News Comment article on Wednesday June 11 which related to gasoline prices, transportation, and health.

    When I started working for Roll Forming Corporation in 1994, several of the office employees suggested that I buy a house in Louisville.

    "That's where everything is", I was repeatedly told. I indicated that I didn't want to make the drive from Louisville to Shelbyville and back every work day. I was glad that I settled in Shelbyville then, and I'm even more so now, especially with the current gasoline price situation.

  • After five years of war in Iraq, it has become strangely common - and even expected - to see flags flying at half-staff around the community.

    While most of us would like to block the war out of our minds, the flags hung at half-staff should serve as a strong reminder to us of the severity of war.

    In honor of the men and women from Kentucky that die in Iraq and Afghanistan, the governor's office sends out a notice to all state agencies to fly flags in front of state buildings in the position of mourning.

  • I am writing to thank the government for my economic stimulus check.

    I spend my money on groceries and my phone bill. My food was really getting low; the money sure came in handy.

    Everybody should be glad they are getting this money and, everybody, please spend it wisely because I don't think we'll be getting any more in the future.

    Tom Douglas,

    Shelbyville

  • I hate spiders.

    I realize that people use the word 'hate' when they don't really mean it.

    However, I use the word emphatically in this instance.

    I know that spiders have their niche in the global ecosystem and they probably look good to each other.

    But in addition to being totally obnoxious, scary and disgusting, they are UGLY!

  • As I was reading the article in the June 4 edition of the Sentinel-News on the graduation ceremony of the class of 2008, the few sentences on the impromptu prayer led by one of the students caught my eye. This student said she did this because "we need God and we need prayer."

  • A missing person is, mercifully, a rare event in the community. Perhaps that explains the exemplary response of community organizations to the baffling disappearance of Maxine Ethington. She disappeared May 25 in her vehicle and has not been seen since.

    It is heartening to see the community's law enforcement, churches and service organizations rally around the Ethington family as they continue the brave search for their mother.

  • I am a bit dismayed with all of the stories in this paper concerning the labor dispute at OVACO this past year. Most of the interviews done recently were with Mr. Horn, an employee of 5 1/2 years. I wonder why no one bothered to talk to the ones who have been with this company for 25-plus years. There are a lot of workers with 30 years and counting. These are the people who could really tell you the true conditions that have come about within the last few years at this factory and stand to worsen in the future.

  • With gas prices on the rise, grumbling is becoming a national past time.

    One of the most inane I have heard goes something like, "There's plenty of oil. Those companies are just exploiting us!"

    Plenty of oil? Time was, we Americans thought there was plenty of forest, plenty of buffalo and plenty of passenger pigeons. And plenty of whales to produce whale oil - the fuel commonly used before we discovered black gold.

  • One of my favorite things to read in this newspaper is the letters to the editor on the opinion page. Just in case you didn't know, the letters to the right of this column are written by local folks who do not necessarily represent the views of the Sentinel-News.

  • On May 27, fiscal court had the opportunity to put all businesses in Shelby County on the same playing field. The issue before them was an ordinance that would allow nine businesses in the county (but outside the city limits of Shelbyville) that are licensed to sell alcohol by the drink to serve their customers on Sundays. There are 72 businesses with the same license, but those inside the city limits are allowed to serve on Sundays. The city council approved an ordinance allowing them to do so, because of economic reasons.

  • We hope a couple of lessons came from last week's bloodletting at fiscal court when it was revealed that two magistrates backed the cause of an individual for a county job.

  • Well, Kentucky had its chance to vote and have it mean something. Hillary Clinton won the vote by 35 percent over Barack Obama.

  • We would like to thank all of the parents, friends and sponsors who made the Mystery Dinner Theatre held on April 18 and April 19 such a success.

    The night would not have been possible without the help and support of everyone involved.

    Kentucky Junior Historical Society,

    East Middle School

  • Pain is an unavoidable part of life. And now that Shelbyville has a skate park, that part of life has become a whole lot harder to avoid for the more than 100 local kids who can now commonly be seen there launching themselves into the air.

    If you haven't been by the skate park next to Daniel Field you should stop and check it out. It's pretty awesome. The park is a young daredevil's dream - full of obstacles, rails and ramps that seem to make gravity a bit less binding.

  • Next week fiscal court will take up an ordinance that would allow the sale of liquor by the drink at restaurants in the county. We think magistrates should say yes.

    The measure would allow establishments that seat at least 100 patrons and get more than 70 percent of their sales from food to serve alcohol by the drink on Sundays. It would allow establishments such as Claudia Sanders Dinner House, the Persimmon Ridge Golf Club, the Cardinal Club and a few others to sell liquor on Sunday, just as more than 60 businesses in the city can do now.

  • This is one of those "By-the-time-you-read-this" columns. I don't usually find much need to write those; however, these are By-the-time-you-read-this times we are living in.

    By the time you read this, we will know who has won the Kentucky primaries. I will have voted and had my say in the good old American process.

  • I serve as the project manager for the Shelby County Historical Society's project to identify and preserve the site of the Simpsonville Slaughter. This is the incident in which about 26 men of Co. E of the Fifth U.S. Colored Cavalry lost their lives in a skirmish with Confederate guerrillas near Simpsonville on January 25, 1865.

  • The unexpected loss of Tim McClure over the weekend was not only a blow to his family and friends, it was a hit to the lovers of plants, trees and gardens in the county and across the state.

    Tim trained dozens of Master Gardeners in the county while Extension agent for horticulture. Tim was the kind of guy who could work from his books and behind his desk, then go out in the field and show how it's done.

  • I've been a poker nut for about five years now. So when I was offered a paid internship, housing included, to go to Las Vegas for a month and a half to cover the World Series of Poker for Card Player Magazine, I had to sit down and talk about the opportunity with the Sentinel-News, and more importantly, my wife.

    My flight leaves May 28.

  • Not long ago, we had a guy call with a complaint about something he wanted to get in (or kept out, I can't remember which) the newspaper. That happens often, but the reason he cited for his demand was a little unusual: "I pay taxes too," he said.