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Opinion

  • As long time employees of Jewish Hospital Shelbyville, we would like to thank the physicians of Shelby Family Medicine for their unwavering support of the facility and the nursing staff.

  • In response to the letter 07-23-2008 by Yvonne Clark, concerning the passage of the Charles & Helen Crabtree Stables, Inc. request for a two acre minor subdivision plat, accusing the Planning & Zoning Board of conspiring to pass the minor subdivision plat because of power and influence is simply and plainly wrong and could not be further from the truth.

  • Reading the July 16, 2008 issue letter to the editor "Scary," I find Ms. Packard's view rather extreme.

    Ms. Packard does point out some features of this new federal mandate that individual states and parents need to be aware and cautious. Presently, 11 states have enacted legislation to restrict DNA's various uses and regulate privacy to families and individuals.

  • Pray at the Pump is a new movement to enlist God's power to lower gas prices. Activist Rocky Twyman, of the Washington, D.C. area, began the group a few months ago because soup kitchen volunteers were unable to drive in from the suburbs because of rising gas prices. So Twyman started the prayer groups.

    People met at gas stations to ask God to give them lower gas prices. So, when prices went down, they gathered to thank God for the recent dip in prices.

    However, I'm not so sure it is God's plan to lower our gas prices. Why should He?

  • Was anyone in the Shelbyville"s Downtown area on Saturday night (July 26) to see the crowds gather? At first I thought only a "Santa" appearance could attract such a turnout! But low and behold it was the first Shelby Co. Car Club's Cruise that closed 4th-7th streets. The air was filled with music from the fantastic street dance band and every inch of the pavement was occupied with a multitude of classic and phenomenal automobiles. Everyone was in a festive mood and the predicted rain never materialized.

  • Talk about a culture shock.

    After living in Vegas for nearly two months -- the city that never sleeps -- I've returned to Farm-town USA -- Shelbyville, Ky.

    Gone are the constant beeps of slot machines, the bumper-to-bumper traffic, the 24/7 crowded sidewalks full of insomniacs, the free drinks in casinos, and the miles of sand that surround the hot and dry Neon City.

    I'm back where it's quiet, the traffic flows, the sidewalks are empty, people sleep too much, booze costs money, and the grass grows.

  • Once again, power and influence take over the law.

    On Tuesday night, the Triple S Planning Commission, back under the direction of George Best, continued their quest to totally ignore the zoning regulations. This time it was Scott Merchant who led the charge.

  • I hated to hear of the passing of Mrs. Tracy. Mrs. Tracy sold me and my family our first TV. She would sell things on time. She would even let you miss a payment if you didn't have the money right then. Who's going to do that these days? She was a very nice and caring lady.

    Edna Douglas,

    Shelbyville

  • The old clich that you shouldn't put all of your eggs in the same basket looks like polished wisdom when it comes to the county's economic health.

    While many parts of the nation are reeling from job losses, depressed home prices and sluggish economic activity in general, Shelby County is doing better than most. Unemployment is higher than it has been for a while, home sales are slow here too, and retailers are feeling the pinch as consumers tighten their belts in response to higher gas prices. But at least one sector of the county's economy - agriculture -- is doing well.

  • There's a new piece of federal legislation that ought to give you a nice case of the heebee geebees, or at least the hives if you are allergic to fascism or have an intense reaction to having your privacy invaded.

    Senate Bill 1858, signed by President Bush on April 24, 2008 requires that all newborn babies in the United States have their DNA collected and cataloged. This is the first step in a genetic catalog of all U.S. citizens.

    The bill includes "that DNA shall be used for experimentation, cataloguing and categorizing."

    Are you squirming yet?

  • The old clich that you shouldn't put all of your eggs in the same basket looks like polished wisdom when it comes to the county's economic health.

    While many parts of the nation are reeling from job losses, depressed home prices and sluggish economic activity in general, Shelby County is doing better than most. Unemployment is higher than it has been for a while, home sales are slow here too, and retailers are feeling the pinch as consumers tighten their belts in response to higher gas prices. But at least one sector of the county's economy - agriculture -- is doing well.

  • I read the article on the girl who said a prayer at the SCHS graduation saying we need God and we need prayer. How can anyone say anything against this?

    We claim to be a Christian country. In surveys almost 70 percent of Americans will tell you that they are Christians, although that's not the truth. If it were, a lot of things we allow in this country would not be tolerated.

    Prayer is not a religious activity; it is a form of worship. God says in First Thessolonians pray without ceasing. Jesus taught others how to pray.

  • Last week a letter to the editor appeared in the Sentinel-News in which the author claimed that a student, by uttering a prayer (GASP!) at the Shelby County High School graduation ceremony, "was disrespectful of the intent of the law and the audience before her."

  • As a resident of Shelbyville, I would like to take the opportunity to thank Jewish Hospital Shelbyville for the Men's Health Fair given on June 14 to the men of our community.

    The service offered that day beckons a warning to us of future infirmaties and thus allows early treatment. Add to this, the event was free.

    Thank you, Jewish Hospital, and the employees and doctors who worked the event.

    Tommy Hower,

    Shelbyville

  • We have all heard it said that the dog is man's best friend.

    Well, that runs true to form, for we all know how most people treat their friends. The dog is no exception. For the dubious honor of being humanity's best friend, the canine is constantly being dogged.

    If you think about all the similes in our language that refer to dogs, you would think people hate them.

    For example, did you ever see a drunk dog? Not only that, but people say, "lie like a dog, sick as a dog, treated like a dog, working like a dog," and the list goes on and on.

  • This opinion is in response to Linda Allewalt's opinion of the alleged disrespect regarding a young lady's impromptu prayer during the SCHS 2008 graduation ceremony. First, let me say that I do respect Ms. Allewalt's opinion as protected by the First Amendment and thusly that I too am forwarded that same protection and right. Let me also remind the readers that the student, in which Ms. Allewalt's opinion is aimed, also has that same protection and right as it will clearly be defined in my opinion.

  • My name is Arlene Cohen and I live in New Jersey. I recently spent time in Louisville, Shelbyville, and Bagdad, Kentucky, researching the history of a woman named Jewett Snook Connell.

  • The only Shelby County that many Americans will ever see is the land along 1-64.

    After passing through the modern sprawl of Louisville, the county line is a welcome site to weary eyes. The land, which is known for its pastoral beauty and natural splendor, draws more tourism and business into the community than any advertisement ever could.

    That splendor has now been compromised.

  • I read and liked your Sentinel-News Comment article on Wednesday June 11 which related to gasoline prices, transportation, and health.

    When I started working for Roll Forming Corporation in 1994, several of the office employees suggested that I buy a house in Louisville.

    "That's where everything is", I was repeatedly told. I indicated that I didn't want to make the drive from Louisville to Shelbyville and back every work day. I was glad that I settled in Shelbyville then, and I'm even more so now, especially with the current gasoline price situation.

  • After five years of war in Iraq, it has become strangely common - and even expected - to see flags flying at half-staff around the community.

    While most of us would like to block the war out of our minds, the flags hung at half-staff should serve as a strong reminder to us of the severity of war.

    In honor of the men and women from Kentucky that die in Iraq and Afghanistan, the governor's office sends out a notice to all state agencies to fly flags in front of state buildings in the position of mourning.