.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • Several years ago, the following letter was reportedly sent to a resident of Greenville County, S.C.:  “Your food stamps will be stopped, effective March 1992, because we received notice that you passed away.  May God bless you.  You may reapply if your circumstances change.”

  • A sure sign of spring is the first sighting of a group of people wearing similar shirts and holding up buckets for donations at an intersection near you.

    They’re there for good causes – they always are – but they’re also there at some peril, and that should require more scrutiny.

    Primary locations for those gathering days are the arteries leading to and from Interstate 64, and therein lies the problem: The traffic is just a little too jammed for this practice to be safe.

  • "A person without a sense of humor is like a wagon without springs. It's jolted by every pebble on the road." ~ Henry Ward Beecher

     People are sad.

  •  The Food & Drug Administration made a good decision last week when it said it would delay for 60 days its new requirements for how large animals can be disposed. This rule, which was scheduled to take effect in April, stated that the brain and spinal cord had to be removed before dead animals older than 30 months could be transported.

  • A pandemic is overcoming us, spreading quickly. Many already have succumbed, and it’s only a matter of time before it affects you, too.

    For there is no more infectious disease – especially in Kentucky – than that familiar malady called March Madness.

    Only a small percentage of you got sick from eating bad ham or, worse, spending a night in jail. But almost the entire population is stricken with the Madness, to some extent or another. Some started showing the disease as early as October, with symptoms growing increasingly severe.

  • A few years ago I had the honor to be on the cover of Editor & Publisher, a decades-old trade magazine that has been a key source of information about our newspaper industry.

    Let me be clear that this was not akin to appearing on People or GQ, but two of my colleagues at the Orlando Sentinel – the Managing Editor and the VP/Product Development -- and I smiled broadly at the camera as poster c

  • We will avoid passing judgment on the way the Shelby County School Board handled the idea of outsourcing its after-school program to the YMCA.

    We simply will say that the board gets an A for imagination and a D in classroom participation. Its communication with affected families on this issue was non-existent, and the fact that the administration didn’t anticipate the outrage would merit detention.

  • When we were first married, my wife, Rhonda, and I lived on the south end of Louisville (the Iroquois Park/Fairdale areas).  Generally speaking, the folks that live in those areas would fit very nicely into a Jeff Foxworthy routine, and we fit in rather well with them.

    One Christmas, we and a few other couples decided to go out for a night of high culture, which for us normally meant an evening at the softball park followed by pizza, or if we were really feeling sophisticated, bowling and dinner at Po’ Folks or Big Boy.

  •  By Stephen Bartlett, Brian Rich, Attica Scott

    Several months after the death of a Salvadoran immigrant housecleaner Ana Romero in custody in the Franklin County jail, we feel the need to be clear about who we hold to be responsible for this tragic death.

  •  Another week has delivered another interesting new discussion about how the Shelby County School Board will structure the new campus it is building west of Shelbyville.

    This is not bad news, mind you. In fact, we suggested three weeks ago that the board members needed to take more time to review the plan it had adopted. There were problematic factors and vacillating forecasts that needed another evaluation.

  • The General Assembly’s passage last week of a bill that would eliminate the CATS test merits further consideration before being signed into law.

    In fact this step, and its effects on the well being of our students, deserves, well, more study.

    There is little doubt that the CATS test – as with most education achievement tests – is flawed. Parents complain that it puts too much pressure on students to perform on one test. Educators complain that it forces them to teach to a test rather than a base of knowledge.

  • A woman was concerned about the health of  someone she had known for many years, so she called her minister.

    “Do we have Mike Casey on our prayer list?” she asked.

    The minister said, no, he was not on the list before slowly adding, “I have to apologize for asking this, but who is Mike Casey?”

    The woman, after pausing to consider what would be a long explanation, simply said, “Well, he’s our hero.”

  • The Internet is a rich source of random thoughts and miscellaneous wisdom.  Under that heading, I offer the following pearls for your consideration:

    1)    Accept that some days you're the pigeon, and some days you're the statue.  

  • You have read the chilling accounts about that teen-aged boy who was shot dead just a block from the library recently.

    You probably didn’t know the victim. You may have heard the chatter about why this might have happened. You probably know even less about the alleged shooter or his whereabouts.

    But at least one of us can speak clearly about what must be the shock and sadness that those who live around that street must feel each day as they pass the spot by the tree where they saw Joel Mena breathing his final breaths. One of us understands.

  • The emerging problem of what we will do with dead livestock in Shelby County is a critical issue that will require a unique solution.

    Last week the FDA announced its new restrictions in how these animals must be handled before they are transported for processing, requiring that skull and spinal cord tissue must be removed as steps to limit spread of bacteria that cause mad cow disease.

    That goal is appreciated – the disease kills people – but these restrictions need to be rethought, because their side effects are untenable for farmers.

  •  Have you noticed lately how many students from Shelby County are winning awards?

    We have individuals and teams winning regional, state and even national awards. Almost every day brings a new note from a teacher or administrator in a school or a proud family member touting the accomplishment of someone.

    There are athletes, musicians, dancers, singers, actors, filmmakers, essayists, speakers, spellers and just plain old visionaries being honored from here to Washington, D.C., and back. Some local winners are still competing on bigger stages,

  • Please forgive some of us if we look at today as a holiday that’s far more important than anything Hallmark invented. There are no red letters or no more school holidays, but many of us circle the date and can’t wait.

    As surely as robins are harbingers of spring, the first district basketball tournament game is a rite of passage in Kentucky that deserves the reverence of the masses.

  • That idea in the General Assembly to create an oversight branch that would do checks and balances on government activities out of the eyes of the public has died – at least for the time being. You no longer have to worry that your state would be using your tax dollars to investigate itself without your being able to find out what was going on. House Speaker Greg Stumbo and Senate President David Williams had coauthored identical bills in their respective houses to create this agency. Legislators had been complaining that they weren’t gett

  •  After years of debate and numerous votes, Shelby County Fiscal Court finally has done the right thing.

  • As a follow-up to my last two columns (which in spite of what some apparently thought, were not primarily about puppies), I’d like to direct your attention again to the idea of truth.

    Perhaps you have heard someone say, or have even said yourself, “Well, that may be true for you, but it isn’t true for me.”  I have never been able to wrap my mind around that sentiment.

    You see, truth—by definition—is not subjective.  Truth is the way things really are; it is what corresponds to actual reality.