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Opinion

  • The final words of rejection and consolation barely had been spoken in the county’s pursuit of Harley-Davidson when Shelby County Fiscal Court proved that it could squeeze some lemonade out of that batch of lemons.

    The court went into special session Monday morning and rescinded its request for a zoning change on acreage near the Shelby County Industrial Park.

  • With Christmas season on full furry-red-suit fury, our radio airwaves are full of the carols, melodies and parodies that brighten our days and help us carry holiday themes all year round.

    Starting on Thanksgiving, they’re there, 24/7, at any of a number of spots on the dial, varying versions and spectacular spoofs along with just the first-sung hymns of the holidays.

  • For nearly a week now Shelby County’s leaders most likely have been feeling like the loser on a romantic reality show or – worse – a jilted groom left at the altar.

    They had put forward their best effort and wooed long and hard to win the hand of the lovely Harley-Davidson only to see that she couldn’t go through with the marriage.

    She loved the proposal – she loved us – but the move to Kentucky was just too much for her.

  • If you believe that statistics don’t lie – and even the most circumspect among us surely do to some extent – then you have to be amazed at the recent report on Shelby County’s efficiency in disposing of DUI cases.

    That better than 92 percent of those charged were convicted during a 4-year period is a significant statement both to those who consider driving after drinking and for those who make sure such drivers are caught when they do.

  • Thanksgiving is our truest and most intrinsic holiday, with a simple, shared message created from the pioneer spirit and carried forward by loyal generations: to join hands,   share a meal and say thanks for each other and all our blessings.

    The pilgrims and the Native Americans got it right in the first place, and with its position after Halloween and before Christmas, Thanksgiving has been allowed to be wonderfully obscured and its noble mission preserved without the clutter and clatter of c

  • Asked to write a composition entitled "What I'm thankful for on Thanksgiving,” 7-year-old Timmy wrote, "I’m thankful that I’m not a turkey!"

  • You may not like what you read, and you may be, like us, getting tired of the rhetoric, but surely you see this as a time to congratulate our congressional leaders for finally doing something that needs drastically to be done: overhaul our health-care system.

    We are a couple of miles from the finish line, it would seem, but the tape on what has been a decades-long run is in sight.

  • The walkover victory and rubberstamp approval Thursday night by Triple S Planning & Zoning for the property that may one day be a home for Harley-Davidson’s largest motorcycle factory was a wonderful moment in Shelby County’s development.

    That unanimous approval by the commission and the absence of acrimony from the public sent a loud, clear and distinct message to the leaders of that corporation: We are behind this bid 100 percent.

  • So my wife and I spent an afternoon at Churchill Downs last Friday. Nice, breezy fall day, small crowd, lots of elbow space, and it was my wife’s first visit to the cathedral of horse racing.

  • I recently read an opinion piece by college student Austin Redmon (“Let’s send the money directly to the students,” Nov. 11) regarding my stance on H.R. 3221. I always appreciate hearing from constituents and knowing they are taking an interest in their government. However, some of Mr. Redmon’s facts were inaccurate.

  • It’s easy for citizens to see holes in the community. It’s simple to make suggestions, call for assistance and, more likely, point fingers. Not so many do the harder thing: to plug that obvious hole. But one man saw a hole and did his best to plug it, and for that we commend the work of Rev. Lee Bean, the minister at Dover Baptist Church. Rev.

  • I heard a story about a young man in Montana who bought a horse from a farmer for $100. The farmer agreed to deliver the horse the next day. However, the next day the farmer drove up and said, "Sorry son, but I have some bad news.  The horse I sold you died." 

    The young man replied, "Well, then just give me my money back."

  • An open letter to the board members of the Harley-Davidson Company:

    We were sure happy last week to read that you were thinking even more seriously of moving your big production plant from Pennsylvania to here.

    Heck, a couple of us have been to York, and although it’s not a bad place, we don’t think it compares with our bluegrass-covered paradise.

  • Though the minutes of its meeting will not mention the name Harley-Davidson, Shelby County Fiscal Court’s vote Tuesday morning may well have been the most  significant card the county could play in its bid to lure Harley-Davidson’s plant from southern Pennsylvania.

    By voting to introduce a zoning change on two large parcels of land that would be appropriately positioned for such an industry, Fiscal Court has confronted what is likely the most sensitive aspect of this project with unprecedented boldness.

  • I recently read Rep. Brett Guthrie’s explanation for voting against the Student Aid and Fiscal Responsibility Act of 2009, and I was very surprised by his statement that he feared it would be “a government takeover of the student loan industry,” The main crux of this piece of legislation was to end the subsidies to private student loan companies and send that money directly to the students.

  •  The power of a simple gift is one of the most amazing powers there is.  From China to Peru, Samaritan’s Purse has been busy sending shoebox gifts to hurting and poor children.  Since 1993, Samaritan’s Purse has delivered more than 61 million shoebox gifts to boys and girls in 130 nations.  Because of this program, children and their families all over the world are impacted and find hope through Jesus.

  • I endured one of those terrible traumas recently that I had hoped never would occur in my lifetime and pray never happens to you.

    On Thursday night, I had to be in my car for about an hour in the late evening. It was a quiet night, not much traffic. No rainfall, even if the sky wasn’t clear.

    And then it happened, as if the fates had reached out and grabbed me by the shirt and dragged me into a new vortex of reality.

    I turned on my radio to listen to a bit of the World Series, and it wasn’t there!

  • We commend the Shelbyville Police Department for its consideration of a new training schedule at its firing range, a schedule that would ensure live bullets don’t fly during traditional school hours.

    That sort of immediate and aggressive response is important in moments of significant public concern, and we can’t be too strong in our underscoring that this is a very important public concern.

  • We, like many citizens of Shelbyville, were stunned and concerned last week to learn of the emergency health problems confronted by Mayor Tom Hardesty.

    We certainly are pleased that he is on the mend and headed toward home and back to work.

  • If you have looked at the Neighbors section today, you have seen one person’s guidebook map for a way to enjoy fall in Shelby County.

    For natives and longtime residents, such a route can be drawn and redrawn, and the outcome is always simple and satisfying. There is no definitive navigation for the beauty we all enjoy.