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Opinion

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    The report recently of the mounting number of accidents on Interstate 64 east of Shelbyville reminds us of the significant need we have for improvements to our primary artery.

    Simply put, two lanes in either direction through Shelby County are not sufficient.

  • This was a sad week for Shelby County, because we lost two people who had devoted so many years to improving the lives of our young people.

    Mary Simmons and Mitch Bailey served in different ways, but their impacts were felt by generations of students who needed a little additional inspiration.

    Ms. Simmons devoted herself to the Dorman Center, where students with special needs of all types were given a chance to be loved and to learn.

  • Call us perplexed about the decision Friday of Senior Judge Steve Mershon to let admitted thief Jody Wills off with less of a sentence than we had expected.

    Call us perplexed because Ms. Wills admitted to the 37 counts against her and accepted the state’s offer of a 10-year sentence rather than risk going to jail for decades.

    Call us perplexed as to why she gets to spend 9 months in the Shelby County Detention Center on work release.

    Call us perplexed that her accepted, 10-year sentence was reduced to those terms plus 5 years of probation.

  • Here’s an upfront promise: There will be no use today of that four-letter S-word. Not a chance.

    And I mean the one that rhymes with grow.

    I can avow that because of a phone call I received from an old buddy in Florida the other day, a call that warmed my heart, brought sunshine to my foreboding sky and probably melted a little of that white precipitation beneath my feet.

  • As you may have heard, according to news reports last Friday, there was measurable snow on the ground in all 50 states. There was some question about whether there was snow on the top of any of the mountains in Hawaii, but because there is some there occasionally, it made a good headline.

    However, what you may not have known is that, according to global warming “experts,” all of our recent snow should have been impossible.

  • The recent announcement that Jewish Hospital Shelbyville and Masonic Home Shelbyville both were rated 5-star nursing homes was a significant moment for our community.

    You surely know that nursing homes are among the most scrutinized and criticized of our health-related facilities. There is a terrible legacy of neglect and corruption in homes across America, and we as citizens always are concerned that our loved ones are well taken care of in their moments of greatest need.

  • It’s Monday evening, and I’m typing this with one eye on the window and the other on the constantly changing weather forecast.

    Yes, that means I have no eyes on my typing, which would bring joy to the heart of Mrs. Paul Fry, who taught me how to push the keys on an old manual upright, but it also means you’ll have to understand if the words come out runtogether, misspelt or even spacd stranjely.

  • Next year, students will benefit from the opening of Martha Layne Collins High School. While many new opportunities will await students, the community is concerned about a lack of support for the Agriculture Program.

    According to Shelby County High School Principal Eddie Oakley, “The community wants to see more emphasis put on animal science and a transition away from agriculture mechanics.”

  • The debate about whether to regulate smoking in Shelby County’s restaurants lands where it should on Tuesday night: in a working session with Shelby County Fiscal Court.

    This is a rudimentary first step toward what we believe is the appropriate action: discussing it on a countywide basis.

  • Back when we were children, Valentine's Day was always a day of excitement and anticipation.

    In my elementary school years, one of the highlights of winter would be our class Valentine Party. Once the date was set, our teacher would utilize the days leading up to the party for preparation.

    We would work for days creating receptacles for our Valentines. One year we decorated brown lunch bags and taped them to our desks.

  • A guy on the phone was making a point about last Tuesday morning’s open skating session on our county’s roads.

    “Don’t you think it’s time people started taking responsibility for driving on icy roads, like they used to a long time ago?” he asked.

     “Now people expect the roads to be in perfect condition all the time. They don’t know how to drive on them when they’re not.”

  • For several weeks now, Shelby County Public Schools has been requesting that the State Department of Highways commit to installing a traffic signal on U.S. 60 in front of the new Collins High School.

    But those requests appear to be, well, stuck in traffic.

  • As we were heading out the door for a meeting at church one recent Sunday evening, I overheard our 10-year-old daughter telling her 9-year-old brother (in her best parental tone), “Chase, put the football back!”

    In no uncertain certain terms, she wanted to make it clear to her brother that he shouldn’t bring his football along to the meeting.

  • This is a scene that might be played out in any town, large or small.

    On a recent weekday, around a lunch table at a popular eatery near the courthouse, sat a judge, a magistrate, a court officer, a banker, a retired businessman, a would-be public official and a newspaper editor.

    In some circles this would be called a power lunch, and in fact each person has a significant role in Shelby County’s power structure.

    All the names at the table were important, just not so important to this story.

  • The slates pretty much are in place for our election year, and we wish we would have more candidates on our ballots.

    Yes, we have some races that have drawn significant interest – the District 20 state senate race prime among them – but in so many places we have leaders who will move directly to November or, more likely, remain in the roles they have.

    The upside of this process is that Shelby County has strong leadership.

  • You have to hand it to the group of 16 middle- and high-school students who created that new film to alert teens to the treachery of drugs and alcohol.

    The New Cool is a 90-second spot that was coordinated through the efforts of Elizabeth Lafferty and Sarah Fouts at Shelby Prevention, and the best part is that its message will be seen and seen and seen.

  • A new and highly flammable issue will come before the Shelbyville City Council on Thursday night: whether smoking should be allowed in restaurants in the city.

    Resident Vladi Gomelsky has been trying to mount a campaign, largely using the social media Web site Facebook, that could lead to a change in local ordinances, and the council appropriately has agreed to hear his suggestion.

    We think Mr. Gomelsky has a good idea.

  • Sometime during the past 10 years, though excavation of my mind has yet to render the moment with precision, I made the daunting and deflowering decision to try cooking.

    I’m not talking about microwaves or opening a lot of cans but of actually taking a recipe, attempting to enhance it and then serving it for the nourishment of family and friends.

    I have been judicious and timid in those efforts, but so far, no one has died, though I fear that day could come.

  • Killing more than 5 million adoptable cats and dogs in the US each year is no longer necessary or acceptable.

    So, please, take your pick – Ranger, Marmalade, Bigsby, Coreen, Sadie, Shorty, Rainbow or Oscar – just eight of the 650-plus homeless animals waiting to be adopted here in Shelby County.

  • The Shelby County City Council responded to a request from some of its citizens to limit smoking at the city’s restaurants about like we expected it would in an election year: not at all.

    A few dozen concerned citizens on both sides of the debate showed up at last Thursday’s council meeting to hear Vladi Gomelsky’s request for the city to consider following others in Kentucky and create an ordinance that would address smoking in restaurants.