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Opinion

  • The walkover victory and rubberstamp approval Thursday night by Triple S Planning & Zoning for the property that may one day be a home for Harley-Davidson’s largest motorcycle factory was a wonderful moment in Shelby County’s development.

    That unanimous approval by the commission and the absence of acrimony from the public sent a loud, clear and distinct message to the leaders of that corporation: We are behind this bid 100 percent.

  • So my wife and I spent an afternoon at Churchill Downs last Friday. Nice, breezy fall day, small crowd, lots of elbow space, and it was my wife’s first visit to the cathedral of horse racing.

  • I recently read an opinion piece by college student Austin Redmon (“Let’s send the money directly to the students,” Nov. 11) regarding my stance on H.R. 3221. I always appreciate hearing from constituents and knowing they are taking an interest in their government. However, some of Mr. Redmon’s facts were inaccurate.

  • It’s easy for citizens to see holes in the community. It’s simple to make suggestions, call for assistance and, more likely, point fingers. Not so many do the harder thing: to plug that obvious hole. But one man saw a hole and did his best to plug it, and for that we commend the work of Rev. Lee Bean, the minister at Dover Baptist Church. Rev.

  • I heard a story about a young man in Montana who bought a horse from a farmer for $100. The farmer agreed to deliver the horse the next day. However, the next day the farmer drove up and said, "Sorry son, but I have some bad news.  The horse I sold you died." 

    The young man replied, "Well, then just give me my money back."

  • An open letter to the board members of the Harley-Davidson Company:

    We were sure happy last week to read that you were thinking even more seriously of moving your big production plant from Pennsylvania to here.

    Heck, a couple of us have been to York, and although it’s not a bad place, we don’t think it compares with our bluegrass-covered paradise.

  • Though the minutes of its meeting will not mention the name Harley-Davidson, Shelby County Fiscal Court’s vote Tuesday morning may well have been the most  significant card the county could play in its bid to lure Harley-Davidson’s plant from southern Pennsylvania.

    By voting to introduce a zoning change on two large parcels of land that would be appropriately positioned for such an industry, Fiscal Court has confronted what is likely the most sensitive aspect of this project with unprecedented boldness.

  • I recently read Rep. Brett Guthrie’s explanation for voting against the Student Aid and Fiscal Responsibility Act of 2009, and I was very surprised by his statement that he feared it would be “a government takeover of the student loan industry,” The main crux of this piece of legislation was to end the subsidies to private student loan companies and send that money directly to the students.

  •  The power of a simple gift is one of the most amazing powers there is.  From China to Peru, Samaritan’s Purse has been busy sending shoebox gifts to hurting and poor children.  Since 1993, Samaritan’s Purse has delivered more than 61 million shoebox gifts to boys and girls in 130 nations.  Because of this program, children and their families all over the world are impacted and find hope through Jesus.

  • I endured one of those terrible traumas recently that I had hoped never would occur in my lifetime and pray never happens to you.

    On Thursday night, I had to be in my car for about an hour in the late evening. It was a quiet night, not much traffic. No rainfall, even if the sky wasn’t clear.

    And then it happened, as if the fates had reached out and grabbed me by the shirt and dragged me into a new vortex of reality.

    I turned on my radio to listen to a bit of the World Series, and it wasn’t there!

  • We commend the Shelbyville Police Department for its consideration of a new training schedule at its firing range, a schedule that would ensure live bullets don’t fly during traditional school hours.

    That sort of immediate and aggressive response is important in moments of significant public concern, and we can’t be too strong in our underscoring that this is a very important public concern.

  • We, like many citizens of Shelbyville, were stunned and concerned last week to learn of the emergency health problems confronted by Mayor Tom Hardesty.

    We certainly are pleased that he is on the mend and headed toward home and back to work.

  • If you have looked at the Neighbors section today, you have seen one person’s guidebook map for a way to enjoy fall in Shelby County.

    For natives and longtime residents, such a route can be drawn and redrawn, and the outcome is always simple and satisfying. There is no definitive navigation for the beauty we all enjoy.

  • Austin Crowe is the newest member of the Shelby County School Board, and we like his moxie.

    Mr. Crowe, a junior at Shelby County High School, took over the student delegate’s seat at the last board meeting, and he made a wonderful impact with his curiosity and his candor.

  • I heard a story about a man, who, after drinking a little too much cider at a Halloween party, was trying to “walk it off” on his way home.  Taking a shortcut through a graveyard, he accidentally stumbled into a freshly dug grave.

    Try as he might to climb out, because of his mostly inebriated condition and because the rain that had fallen earlier in the day had made the sides of the grave muddy and slick, he finally gave up.

  • I have now been baptized into the rite of Big Blue basketball. It may not have been full immersion, but I have received a very steady sprinkling of UK’s holy water.

    For Friday night I watched that tent revival known as Big Blue Madness, and I felt the holy spirit of Adolph Rupp seize me with a ferocious grip. Had I actually been in Rupp Arena, I’m sure I would have responded to the alter call of  Rev. John Calipari. It seemed as if thousands did that even before the preaching.

  • The Shelby County Rockets are playing their last football season as a unified high school. For the first time in more than three decades, there will be two football teams representing the county next fall.

    And this team is trying to make its last season as one truly memorable.

    The Rockets, who won just a single game last fall, have rebounded to win seven this year, and with their rout of Southern last Friday night, they have earned the school’s first home playoff game since 1995.

  • I submitted to getting a flu shot the other day. I’ve never had one, and I didn’t see the need to get one this year. But I’ve read the stories, and I have two little germ incubators at home. They drag in everything that the dogs don’t. After some encouragement, getting the shot seemed prudent. It’s not that I’m afraid of needles. I’m just not afraid of illness. But I should be.

  • I recently coached a 7-8-year-old basketball team at our church. After watching them for the first two practices and the first game, I came to the realization that before I could try to teach these children anything about basketball, we first needed to work on some self-awareness exercises.

  •  How many of you arise early every morning, put your child in your car and drive him to school?

    Maybe you drive only a few blocks or maybe a mile, or 5 miles, or 10 miles, perhaps even more. Your route and your routine are rote.

    These mornings, it’s dark until nearly 7:30. Sometimes the dew has left your windows fogged, and soon there will be frost that will require extra time to be removed.