.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • Next year, students will benefit from the opening of Martha Layne Collins High School. While many new opportunities will await students, the community is concerned about a lack of support for the Agriculture Program.

    According to Shelby County High School Principal Eddie Oakley, “The community wants to see more emphasis put on animal science and a transition away from agriculture mechanics.”

  • The debate about whether to regulate smoking in Shelby County’s restaurants lands where it should on Tuesday night: in a working session with Shelby County Fiscal Court.

    This is a rudimentary first step toward what we believe is the appropriate action: discussing it on a countywide basis.

  • Back when we were children, Valentine's Day was always a day of excitement and anticipation.

    In my elementary school years, one of the highlights of winter would be our class Valentine Party. Once the date was set, our teacher would utilize the days leading up to the party for preparation.

    We would work for days creating receptacles for our Valentines. One year we decorated brown lunch bags and taped them to our desks.

  • A guy on the phone was making a point about last Tuesday morning’s open skating session on our county’s roads.

    “Don’t you think it’s time people started taking responsibility for driving on icy roads, like they used to a long time ago?” he asked.

     “Now people expect the roads to be in perfect condition all the time. They don’t know how to drive on them when they’re not.”

  • For several weeks now, Shelby County Public Schools has been requesting that the State Department of Highways commit to installing a traffic signal on U.S. 60 in front of the new Collins High School.

    But those requests appear to be, well, stuck in traffic.

  • As we were heading out the door for a meeting at church one recent Sunday evening, I overheard our 10-year-old daughter telling her 9-year-old brother (in her best parental tone), “Chase, put the football back!”

    In no uncertain certain terms, she wanted to make it clear to her brother that he shouldn’t bring his football along to the meeting.

  • This is a scene that might be played out in any town, large or small.

    On a recent weekday, around a lunch table at a popular eatery near the courthouse, sat a judge, a magistrate, a court officer, a banker, a retired businessman, a would-be public official and a newspaper editor.

    In some circles this would be called a power lunch, and in fact each person has a significant role in Shelby County’s power structure.

    All the names at the table were important, just not so important to this story.

  • The slates pretty much are in place for our election year, and we wish we would have more candidates on our ballots.

    Yes, we have some races that have drawn significant interest – the District 20 state senate race prime among them – but in so many places we have leaders who will move directly to November or, more likely, remain in the roles they have.

    The upside of this process is that Shelby County has strong leadership.

  • You have to hand it to the group of 16 middle- and high-school students who created that new film to alert teens to the treachery of drugs and alcohol.

    The New Cool is a 90-second spot that was coordinated through the efforts of Elizabeth Lafferty and Sarah Fouts at Shelby Prevention, and the best part is that its message will be seen and seen and seen.

  • A new and highly flammable issue will come before the Shelbyville City Council on Thursday night: whether smoking should be allowed in restaurants in the city.

    Resident Vladi Gomelsky has been trying to mount a campaign, largely using the social media Web site Facebook, that could lead to a change in local ordinances, and the council appropriately has agreed to hear his suggestion.

    We think Mr. Gomelsky has a good idea.

  • Sometime during the past 10 years, though excavation of my mind has yet to render the moment with precision, I made the daunting and deflowering decision to try cooking.

    I’m not talking about microwaves or opening a lot of cans but of actually taking a recipe, attempting to enhance it and then serving it for the nourishment of family and friends.

    I have been judicious and timid in those efforts, but so far, no one has died, though I fear that day could come.

  • Killing more than 5 million adoptable cats and dogs in the US each year is no longer necessary or acceptable.

    So, please, take your pick – Ranger, Marmalade, Bigsby, Coreen, Sadie, Shorty, Rainbow or Oscar – just eight of the 650-plus homeless animals waiting to be adopted here in Shelby County.

  • The Shelby County City Council responded to a request from some of its citizens to limit smoking at the city’s restaurants about like we expected it would in an election year: not at all.

    A few dozen concerned citizens on both sides of the debate showed up at last Thursday’s council meeting to hear Vladi Gomelsky’s request for the city to consider following others in Kentucky and create an ordinance that would address smoking in restaurants.

  • Sometimes the public questions the activities of Triple S Planning & Zoning, saying the commission is not operating in the clear or reflecting the public’s desires.

    But, no matter whether or not you agree with those points, we believe you have to join us in offering congratulations to the board for its strong, purposeful and appropriate steps to remove a collection of unsightly automobiles from properties on the western extremes of Shelbyville.

  • Just the other day I overheard a couple of ladies discussing the growing number of Hispanics in Shelby County. They were judging the boom of this population by their increasing presence in one of our county’s most cherished landmarks. While shopping, one lady said, “There are more and more people speaking Mexican at Walmart everyday.” 

  • What are the polarizations that exist within our little community of Shelbyville?

    Of course we have three prominent groups—White, Black, and Latino—that commingle to make Shelbyville, well, Shelbyville.

  • If you have a 6-to-14-year-old girl that lives in your house, you are no doubt well aware of the popular Disney Channel show, Hannah Montana.

    For those who are not blessed with a young girl at home, allow me to enlighten you. The premise of the show is that the main character, Miley Stewart (played by actress Miley Cyrus), is a very talented singer that could make it big in the music industry.

  • The TV weathercaster gave a smile to the screen last week and warned us, “We’re about to have the snowstorm of the decade,” a comment so clever it sailed right over the heads of his fellow anchors.

  • On Thursday the Shelby County School Board honored seven new board-certified teachers.

    We congratulate Elizabeth Bland, Clear Creek Elementary; Angela Chambers, Simpsonville Elementary; April Manning, Simpsonville Elementary; Rebekah Meredith, Painted Stone Elementary; Jenna Richardson, Simpsonville Elementary; Sarah Smith, Southside Elementary; and Anita White, Simpsonville Elementary.

  • Today you were supposed to read some pithy commentary about the new year, the past decade and one man’s 10-year graduate degree in life. You were to be enlightened, informed, entertained and inspired.