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Opinion

  • Wasn’t the story of Lynn Whitehouse one of Shelby County’s feel-good stories of the year?

    Ms. Whitehouse is our neighbor who ran in the Derby Festival mini-marathon in 2009, found she had an aggressive form of breast cancer, was treated radically for it and came back to run the mini again two weeks ago.

    On Friday she participated in the walk of breast cancer survivors just before post time for the Kentucky Oaks, a celebration to raise awareness for the Susan G. Komen Foundation and the need for research in breast cancer.

  • I heard that several years ago when President George H.W. Bush was on the campaign trail, he stopped in to visit some residents in a nursing home.

    He walked up to one elderly woman in a wheelchair and said, “Hello there, ma’am, what’s your name?” 

  • Magnanimous public gifts can be hard to qualify. Everyone’s contribution to the greater good is like the Widow’s Mite of the old Biblical parable – its beauty lying in the completeness of the donation, even if its scope seems small when compared to others.

    So the intent here is not to offer a loud and prolonged thank you to Roger and Diane Shott for the size of their gift to Shelby County but for what that gift represents.

  • This is a story about a cat, but it’s not about one of those strays running around Zaring Mill Road.

    This one came from a nice, traditional cat family, though road-dropped relatives may have been in the gene pool.

    This cat didn’t live in a box in someone’s corner, wasn’t fed anything out of a can or box, didn’t know litter from a ladder and was responsible for her own grooming.

    We didn’t know her pedigree. She never saw a cage or a doctor.

    But she did know love, survival and the place that was her home.

  • There was a long debate Tuesday at Shelby County Fiscal Court about the salaries that constables should be paid in Shelby County in the coming fiscal year.

    This was an important and timely discussion because those pay scales should be in place for the candidates who are running in the seven districts next month and next fall.

  • We knew the worst was going to happen sooner rather than later.

    We knew, tragically, that nothing would be done about the problem until it was brought to the forefront by damage to human flesh.

  • Tiger Woods returned to golf last week, and though you may say that’s a sports story that happened far away, we now know, of course, that this more accurately was a morality play acted out primarily on a golf course.

    My role here is not to condemn Tiger or to affirm the choices he has made at this very delicate and important crossroads of his life.

  • A couple drove down a country road for several miles, not saying a word. An earlier discussion had led to an argument, and neither of them wanted to concede their position.

    As they passed a barnyard of mules, goats and pigs, the husband couldn’t remain silent. He glanced at his wife and asked sarcastically, "Relatives of yours?"

  • We were inspired to learn last week that the state fire marshal and the Kentucky State Police are looking into the fire on Golden Rod court that nearly became a tragedy, were it not for the heroics of nanny Alyson Myatt.

    The strange circumstances surrounding this fire are so unusual that an investigation can do nothing but help to bring closure to an awful event.

  • Joe Dean called it “string music.”

    Cawood Ledford – and I humbly apologize for juxtaposing those two names – described it by many melodic monikers, such as “rambling the ropes,” “tickling the twine” or “nothing but nylon.”

    Wannabe athletes have for decades created catchy calls, but ultimately they wind up with a simple, elegant word: “pure.”

  • The tragic passing of Mike Casey last week offers a unique opportunity for Shelby County to create a memorial to his legacy as an athlete, an icon and simply a good person so many felt blessed to know.

    In fact, there are two memorials for which we would recommend immediate action.

    First, we encourage the Simpsonville City Commission to name its city recreational complex in honor of Mr. Casey.

  • When you sit down to write about Easter, you have to pause.

    We are taught in the College of Political Correctness to walk the center stripe when it comes to issues involving religion and faith. We are taught to keep those feelings private and not sell our souls, if you will, in public.

    But those among us who are Christians were charged by Jesus to spread the word of His name and His message to the world, anointing each of us as disciples in that task.

  • The Family Activities Center at Clear Creek Park celebrated its 10th birthday last week, and that was important not just for what it means for the facility but also for all residents of Shelby County. In few counties does the public have access to such a quality facility as the FAC. Usually it’s the larger metro areas with their larger tax bases that are able to put to

  • Were you surprised to see last week that the contractors responsible for the Shelbyville Bypass didn’t start work on the first day they were supposed to work?

    We certainly weren’t.

  • “The angel said to the women, ‘Do not be afraid, for I know that you are looking for Jesus, who was crucified. He is not here; he has risen, just as he said.’” (Matthew 28:5-6)

    Several years ago, the following letter was reportedly sent to a resident of Greenville County, S.C.:

  • The General Assembly is very close to taking away one of your rights to access, and it’s a remarkable reaction to a law that most members didn’t even know existed.

    The House of Representatives voted last week to approve a bill that would allow evaluations of school superintendents to be done in private session. The Senate had approved a similar measure earlier this month.

    All that keeps this from putting you behind a screen of secrecy is a language approval by the Senate and Gov. Steve Beshear’s signature.

  • Sometimes the home team doesn’t have to bring home the hardware for a champion to be special. You root, root, root for the home team, but if they don’t win it isn’t always a shame.

    And thus we can and should embrace the victory by Shelby Valley in the 2010 Sweet Sixteen as just a bit sweeter than the winner in a routine year.

  • You have read and probably even seen so much about Alyson Myatt, the young woman who saved the little boy from the fire last week.

    She rushed through the flames barefoot in one of those rare acts of heroism that all of us wonder if we have within us.

    The world is filled with unsung heroes – you probably know many of them – but there are few whose deeds are so bold, so brave and so remarkably pure of heart.

  •    Here, on St. Patrick’s Day, the green you see is not just from the Irish among us but is worn on the faces of hundreds of other communities across Kentucky.

  • The state and the FDIC’s investigation into Citizens Union Bank’s lending practices seemed appropriate and mindful of the bank’s customers.

    If you have invested your money in one of the most stalwart institutions in our community, you want to know that it is being protected with every ounce of regulation that can be mustered. You appreciate the vigilance.

    The bank’s CEO, Billie Wade, and its president, David Bowling, were candid in their responses to the inquiry, though they kept private the inner workings of problem loans.