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Opinion

  •  Five years ago today – and as I type the word “five” I shudder to conceive all that has happened since – I woke up sleeping in the back of my pickup truck.

  •  If you missed last Monday’s Taste & Tunes put on by the Shelby County Chamber of Commerce, you missed a lot of fun and great food.

  •  Many years ago, when I was a young reporter working in Jackson, Miss., I wrote an editorial on a sports opinion page about a new stadium lease agreement the Jackson Mets were seeking with the City of Jackson.

    In those six or eight paragraphs, all well-developed logic that prodded the city to get in the game, I included one very large and significant error in the way I stated the percentage of increase the city was seeking.

  • A preacher came across a small group of boys who had circled around a small dog and were talking among themselves. “What are you boys…”

    We interrupt this regularly-scheduled column to bring you an update from the mad, mad, mad world of political correctness.

  • We have heard at last from the folks at Kay and Kay Contracting. At least we think we have.

  • We like it when our top elected leaders come to town.

    We like it a whole lot better when we actually can speak to them rather than just listen to what they have to say.

  • Early one morning, a mother went in to wake up her son. “Wake up, son. It's the first day of school.”

    “But, Mom, I don't want to go,” he said.

    “Give me two reasons why you don't want to go,” his mother demanded.

    “Well, the kids make fun of me for one, and the teachers don’t like me either!”

  • There is a lot of lip service this week to the man we used to call “The Louisville Lip.”

    You most likely know him as Muhammad Ali, arguably the greatest boxer in history and unquestionably the most colorful ambassador our state and city – and probably country – ever has had.

  • The opening of the spiffy Martha Layne Collins High School is now complete, and Shelby County Public Schools officials are getting what they should expect: first-term grades for how they managed that process. Certainly critics are emerging to mark in their grade books how effectively the district has built the high school and the equity, fairness and equality – if not redundant – with which its plans included Shelby County High School. We understand this feedback, and we think it is useful.

  • We continue to hear the buzz that Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger might be dipping his toes fairly deeply into gubernatorial waters.

    You’ve no doubt read the reports that Mr. Rothenburger says he is exploring a run for the Republican nomination against Gov. Steve Beshear next November, and you may also have noted that his political partners and counterparts alike in Shelby County have encouraged such a venture.

  • I take the headline for today’s column from the 1963 movie of the same name. That movie, which I’m happy to recommend, featured a cast that was a virtual who’s who of the stars of that day, including Spencer Tracy, Milton Berle, Ethel Merman, Sid Caesar, Buddy Hackett, Mickey Rooney and Jonathan Winters.

    The plot involves the dying words of a thief, which spark a crazy, cross-country race to find a hidden treasure.   

  • The road to Jericho must run through Shelby County, and we aren’t talking about that fishing hole near Smithfield.

    We’re talking about a higher road and what seems to be growing evidence that when anyone is stuck alongside one of our byways, injured, defeated and left to the fates of humankind, our residents step forward and tend to those needs in ways that transcend the beauty of simple giving.

  • This latest morass with the Shelbyville Bypass – that the seemingly never-ending arc of 4.5 miles engineers now say will require a miracle to open before 2011 – leaves us struggling with all sorts of emotions.

    First there is denial.

    We can’t conceive that a road so short could stand incomplete after more than 486 authorized days of construction that started in May of 2006.

  • That sneaky look that sometimes crosses my darling wife’s face at odd moments greeted me Saturday afternoon, just after I had returned from an errand. You probably know a similar look. Under some circumstances, it can freeze you, and under others, it can melt your heart.

    This was a melting moment.

    “We’re going on an adventure,” she said.

  • The first day of school can be the first day of not only a new educational cycle but also of a new opportunity.

    Students mostly are eager to return to campuses, if not always precisely to return to classes, and teachers have recharged batteries, newly learned techniques and tactics and, for some, new rooms in which to try to influence minds.

  • The person on the phone had some tough questions.

    It was a political candidate who wanted to know why the opposition’s big community event was in the newspaper’s Datebook.

    I tried to explain carefully.

    The event was open to the public, I said. It was being held in a public place. It was free.

  • The University of Kentucky announced this week that Shelby County’s Mike Casey would be added this fall to its athletic hall-of-fame.

    We are perplexed: He wasn’t already in UK’s hall of fame?

    One of the top 15 career scorers for college basketball’s most successful program and one of its landmark coaches hadn’t been inducted in the past four decades?

  • Amy Wells listened in class, and as a result, one of her students escaped a difficult situation.

    Ms. Wells is a staff member at Jacob’s Ladder Preschool in Shelbyville, and about a week ago, she was there when a chip became stuck in the throat of one of the students.

  • I have just returned from a weekend trip to the hill country of Texas.

    If you haven’t been there, I recommend this vast land, filled with millions of acres of sprawling ranches, billions of live oak trees and zillions of jaw-dropping vistas of a sparseness and grandeur that are far removed from our beautiful north-central Kentucky.

  •     The athletes at Martha Layne Collins High School are going to be a bit safer this summer.

    Because of the power of the name of the new high school’s namesake and an opportunity created by a committed parent, those who play sports at Collins during the summer heat will be provided with so-called “hot