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Opinion

  • This latest morass with the Shelbyville Bypass – that the seemingly never-ending arc of 4.5 miles engineers now say will require a miracle to open before 2011 – leaves us struggling with all sorts of emotions.

    First there is denial.

    We can’t conceive that a road so short could stand incomplete after more than 486 authorized days of construction that started in May of 2006.

  • That sneaky look that sometimes crosses my darling wife’s face at odd moments greeted me Saturday afternoon, just after I had returned from an errand. You probably know a similar look. Under some circumstances, it can freeze you, and under others, it can melt your heart.

    This was a melting moment.

    “We’re going on an adventure,” she said.

  • The first day of school can be the first day of not only a new educational cycle but also of a new opportunity.

    Students mostly are eager to return to campuses, if not always precisely to return to classes, and teachers have recharged batteries, newly learned techniques and tactics and, for some, new rooms in which to try to influence minds.

  • The person on the phone had some tough questions.

    It was a political candidate who wanted to know why the opposition’s big community event was in the newspaper’s Datebook.

    I tried to explain carefully.

    The event was open to the public, I said. It was being held in a public place. It was free.

  • The University of Kentucky announced this week that Shelby County’s Mike Casey would be added this fall to its athletic hall-of-fame.

    We are perplexed: He wasn’t already in UK’s hall of fame?

    One of the top 15 career scorers for college basketball’s most successful program and one of its landmark coaches hadn’t been inducted in the past four decades?

  • Amy Wells listened in class, and as a result, one of her students escaped a difficult situation.

    Ms. Wells is a staff member at Jacob’s Ladder Preschool in Shelbyville, and about a week ago, she was there when a chip became stuck in the throat of one of the students.

  • I have just returned from a weekend trip to the hill country of Texas.

    If you haven’t been there, I recommend this vast land, filled with millions of acres of sprawling ranches, billions of live oak trees and zillions of jaw-dropping vistas of a sparseness and grandeur that are far removed from our beautiful north-central Kentucky.

  •     The athletes at Martha Layne Collins High School are going to be a bit safer this summer.

    Because of the power of the name of the new high school’s namesake and an opportunity created by a committed parent, those who play sports at Collins during the summer heat will be provided with so-called “hot

  • The Shelbyville Horse Show, judged by tourism officials to be one of the 10 best summer events in Kentucky, lived up to its reputation again this past weekend.

    Under sunny if steamy skies – a nice change from a year ago – the show’s 21st annual edition brought in nice crowds and amazing animals.

  • I have previously listed in this column what I consider the two most important truths in the universe: 1) There is a God, and 2) You’re not Him.

    Today I would like to offer this corollary truth: God is BIG, and we are small.

    Many have undertaken to explain exactly how big God is. One old preacher said it this way, “God is so big He bumps into Himself.”

    That’s pretty big.

  • That was quite a drug bust out near Southville this past week.

    The Shelby County Sheriff’s Office and the Kentucky State Police task force that worked together to take a million dollars worth of marijuana and thousands of dollars in ill-gotten cash out of circulation in Shelby County is most commendable.

  • The man calling the radio show said he was visiting Mount Hood in Oregon. It was 4:45 a.m. there, and he said the temperature was in the 50s.

    He said the high on Monday was 85, but the heat index was 70, meaning wind chill was at play, as were snowboarders and skiers who ventured to the summit of the mountain, about 12,000 feet up.

  • The deadline is less than a week away for the final slate of candidates for this year’s General Election, and we’re concerned that the list of those interested in public service won’t grow at all.

    The races for Simpsonville City Commission and the Shelby County School Board are drawing far less attention than they did in 2008. No new blood or – worse – new ideas have emerged.

  • The handwriting is on the wall, and we think one of our organizations has an idea that just might provide the eraser.

    We’re talking about the problem with graffiti – and trashy areas, in general – in Shelby County.

    Shelby Prevention can’t necessarily prevent the problem, but the organization certainly can try to generate an effort to wipe it out. And that’s what it plans to do.

  • In an effort to argue that religious freedom is under attack in our country, Chuck Souder of Shelby Christian Church used the recent Supreme Court ruling in favor of Hastings College of Law (Christian Legal Society v. Martinez) to illustrate his charge (“Yes, America, you’ve come a long way, baby,” July 9).

    I found his explanation of this ruling rather strange, since he neglected to mention the central issue in the case and managed generally to distort the ruling and its effects.

  • The news for Citizens Union Bank seems more dark today, and we fear that darkness might be obscuring a very key process for all of us.

    In the wake of what seemed an announcement to celebrate – the naming of two willing new chairs for CUB’s boards – came the discordant drop of a lawsuit from former CEO Billie Wade.

  • In a county that is woefully underrepresented by African-Americans in its leadership positions – School Board Chair Brenda Jackson is the only truly public figure – we embrace those who step forward, who share ideas and commitment, as touchstones for all.

    And today we celebrate the accomplishments of two people with good ideas.

  • In my last column, I brought attention to a recent Supreme Court decision in which the court upheld the University of California's Hastings College of Law’s decision to refuse to recognize officially a Christian Legal Society (CLS) chapter because CLS requires its members to adhere to a statement of faith.

  • The Humane Society’s new headquarters looks like a pretty hopping place.

    There are hundreds – perhaps thousands – of unwanted animals in need of care and treatment in Shelby County, and the society through its private fund-raising and a generous donation for Shelby County Fiscal Court now has a facility that should help address those needs.

  • We applaud the members of the Class of 2010 as they stride confidently into the future.

    This last unified graduating class of Shelby County always will hold an historical place, and it set an outstanding example for all that follow.

    These seniors excelled in academics, leadership and volunteerism.

    They were recognized with more than $2 million in scholarships and grants.

    They are attending more than 40 different colleges and secondary schools.