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Opinion

  • Quick, the title of this week’s column is a quote from: A) the President, telling us how far into debt he plans to take us; B) the weatherman, telling us how high the temperature will go tomorrow, or C) a famous cartoon character?

    If you guessed ‘C’, you are correct, and ready to play today’s game. We begin today with a test of your knowledge of famous movie lines. Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to determine who said the following lines.

  • Chicken Little seems to be alive and well and living in Shelby County.

    At least that is what we fear.

    Those weather sirens that have been blaring away recently in late-evening and early-morning hours are supposed to tell us the sky is falling, but so far they have proven to be nothing but, yes, false alarms.

  • I was on the south side of Main Street, waiting for the traffic to clear, and I looked across and saw that big red sign in the window at 535 Main.

    Yes, it’s that for sale/for rent sign in the window of the former Maggie’s Bistro, and, though I certainly had seen it before that moment, I can’t tell you how sad it made me.

  • I was on the south side of Main Street, waiting for the traffic to clear, and I looked across and saw that big red sign in the window at 535 Main.

    Yes, it’s that for sale/for rent sign in the window of the former Maggie’s Bistro, and, though I certainly had seen it before that moment, I can’t tell you how sad it made me.

  • A year ago we brought forward some significant ideas for the Shelby County Fair.

    We feared a disconnect with the community, and we felt the expense was pushing away the public.

    We think there is work to be done in both those areas, but we have to give the Fair Board a blue ribbon for its efforts this year.

  • The county parks board sure knew how to celebrate July 4th this year, and we’re not talking about the fireworks show on Monday.

    Its dedication on Sunday of bronze sculptures to honor Bobby Stratton’s contributions to the baseball programs – and youth – of Shelby County was, in our minds, a waist-high fastball right down the middle.

  • To commemorate this season of graduation, allow me to share this letter written to advice columnist Ann Landers.

    Dear Ann Landers: I have two brothers – one just graduated from the University of Kentucky, and the other was sent to the electric chair. My mother lives in an insane asylum. Since I was 3 years old, my father has been a drug dealer. One of my sisters is a highly paid prostitute; the other is the mistress of a local businessman who has Mafia connections.

  • The year was 1950, and I was 19 years old, having just completed my sophomore year at the University of Kentucky, majoring in journalism. I was home for the summer, working on my hometown newspaper, The Gleaner, in Henderson.

    Let me tell you first of all that working for a newspaper was not at all like newspaper work today.

  • Shelby County this week is losing two long contributors to the quality of life for all of us with the retirements of Dr. Ronald Waldridge and Circuit Clerk Kathy Nichols.

    Public service is like our profession not so much a career as a calling. No one gets rich – except the citizens who benefit from officials’ personal efforts.

    First, there’s Dr. Waldridge, the recognized father of public parks in our county.

  • We now grudgingly admit that the Shelbyville Bypass may indeed be completed by Labor Day. The finishing touches are being put into place.

  • The sticker shock is stunning, something that makes you turn your head and look for a second time.

    Then you hear the kicker: Every time you play, you have to pay.

    We’re talking about the weekend admission to the Shelby County Fair.

    $10. Not chump change, considering that rides, food and everything else cost extra.

  • The Primary Election has passed, and now we have our slate for November.

    There are not enough candidates in our races, but still we have key choices to make.

    We congratulate candidates who won primaries, those who won vs. indifference (i.e. no competition) and those who will join this process in the fall.

  • Numerous state transportation officials came to Shelby County last week to talk about safety on Interstate 64. They rallied at the rest stop near Simpsonville to talk about the dangers that the highway and its drivers and construction workers are facing these days.

    And though we realize workers standing alongside frustrated and crowded drivers can cause a verifiable hazard that requires all of our attention, we also see clearly where Cabinet officials are placing their collective weight.

  • Dear Class of 2010

    Welcome to your first real step into adulthood.

    We congratulate you, the last graduating class of a unified Shelby County High School, and we are glad to have you among us.

    Because we need you.

    We have looked at your resume, and we have been amazed at what you have accomplished these past four years.

  • In the April 2 edition of The Sentinel-News, my attention was drawn to a brief three-line snippet that was buried among other news items in "Looking Backward," the weekly feature that spans nearly a century of Shelby County doings.

     "75 years ago, 1935 ... David Whittaker [sic], an eighth-grade student at Clark School, won the County Spelling Bee."

  • The World Cup of soccer begins this week, and all eyes will be fixed on the competition in South Africa.

    At least that’s what they tell me.

    I hear it on ESPN, read about it on the cover of Sports Illustrated and see it promoted in multicultural eating establishments around the area.

    This is said to be the biggest and greatest sports event in the world.

  • We thought the community had great reason to celebrate when the Shelby County Rockets earned their way into the state basketball tournament.

    But now, thanks to two rousing victories in the 8th Regional Tournament, the last year of the unified Shelby County High School will finish with two teams vying for a state championship.

  • The Crusade for Children has been part of the calendar in Kentucky and an intransient icon in our memories for most of all our lives.

    It was during the polio era in the early 1950s that the folks at WHAS in Louisville gave birth to a telethon fundraiser that seized those who viewed with its ability to generate dollars, its concept of community cause and its determination to dazzle us as well as move us.

  • The Shelbyville City Council took an unusual step at its recent meeting in passing a resolution in support of denying a liquor license for those who want to open what it called a “beer bar” at 616 Main Street.

    For the council as an elected body to offer its opinions on what essentially is a private business matter might seem to some to be employing its collective power inappropriately.

  • The photo is grainy in that 1960s, take-your-film-to-the-drugstore kind of Kodachrome way.

    But it is indelible in its image of a family enjoying time in a large body of water, the sort that drifts into the horizon, never to be seen again. Two little boys and their Mom and another family wade in the obviously warm and nearly knee-deep salt water, wonder on their faces and in their body language.