.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • This has been a rather difficult athletic season for Shelby County High School.

    The Rockets are not soaring as they usually have, and most of their head-to-head match-ups with new rival Collins have not gone well.

    But then last week a group of young girls from SCHS played their way into the state golf tournament and contended admirably and bravely for a championship.

  • If you’ve passed recently any intersection of the Shelbyville Bypass, you likely have been amazed and even a bit mystified at the level of work being done on our incomplete roadway.

    There are clouds of dust, lined up personnel and equipment and just a general beehive of movement – almost any hour of the day and even on the weekend – that is at once heartwarming and blood-boiling.

  • There remains a little less than a month until Election Day, and it can’t arrive too soon for us.

    We realize candidates have messages to spread and that voters have decisions to make.

    But, frankly, we think both those processes are being lost in the bombardment of mud that smacks firmly against the sides of our heads nearly every day.

  • You may have read in recent weeks about the number of industries in Shelby County that are trying to become increasingly green.

    We know that the report in last week’s Sentinel-News was only a sampling of what is going on in our manufacturing areas, but we were heartened to see so much anecdotal evidence that our industries want to help the environment.

  • For many years, in many places and for many reasons, I have stood in front of my television screen on Derby Day and unabashedly shed a tear when My Old Kentucky Home was sung.

    Like most of my generation, I learned the words – the original ones, I might add – in grade school and have burned them into those vocal tracks of my soul, to be plucked and tweaked on an occasional basis in an emotional serenade of my essence.

  • Last weekend my family went camping.

    Now, I am aware that there are those who love the great outdoors. For those people, the sights, sounds and smells of nature are the closest things to heaven on earth that they can find.

    There are those that love to camp in tents, to be at one with creation, to go to sleep with the sound of the crickets and frogs in their ears and wake to the feel of the dewy grass under their feet.

  • Shelby County lost another one of its quieter but more influential residents this past week.

    Henry Cleveland may have been known as an affable mailman, a documentary photographer and a God-fearing friend to many residents, but to Shelby County he was all those things and more.

    Mr. Cleveland has helped record the history of our county, taking images of its people and places and collecting them as a valuable and irreplaceable archive.

  • The report card overall this past week for Shelby County Public Schools was pretty good: A solid B, we would offer.

    That’s not to say the slightly improved test scores on the elementary and middle school levels were all that significant. We aren’t convinced the standardized testing really matters in measuring education quite as much as we sometimes would be led to believe.

  • A couple of weeks ago we commended Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger for his thoughtful review of a bid to run for governor. Our position was – and remains – that we like to see Shelby Countians step forward and seek h

  •  Five years ago today – and as I type the word “five” I shudder to conceive all that has happened since – I woke up sleeping in the back of my pickup truck.

  •  If you missed last Monday’s Taste & Tunes put on by the Shelby County Chamber of Commerce, you missed a lot of fun and great food.

  •  Many years ago, when I was a young reporter working in Jackson, Miss., I wrote an editorial on a sports opinion page about a new stadium lease agreement the Jackson Mets were seeking with the City of Jackson.

    In those six or eight paragraphs, all well-developed logic that prodded the city to get in the game, I included one very large and significant error in the way I stated the percentage of increase the city was seeking.

  • A preacher came across a small group of boys who had circled around a small dog and were talking among themselves. “What are you boys…”

    We interrupt this regularly-scheduled column to bring you an update from the mad, mad, mad world of political correctness.

  • We have heard at last from the folks at Kay and Kay Contracting. At least we think we have.

  • We like it when our top elected leaders come to town.

    We like it a whole lot better when we actually can speak to them rather than just listen to what they have to say.

  • Early one morning, a mother went in to wake up her son. “Wake up, son. It's the first day of school.”

    “But, Mom, I don't want to go,” he said.

    “Give me two reasons why you don't want to go,” his mother demanded.

    “Well, the kids make fun of me for one, and the teachers don’t like me either!”

  • There is a lot of lip service this week to the man we used to call “The Louisville Lip.”

    You most likely know him as Muhammad Ali, arguably the greatest boxer in history and unquestionably the most colorful ambassador our state and city – and probably country – ever has had.

  • The opening of the spiffy Martha Layne Collins High School is now complete, and Shelby County Public Schools officials are getting what they should expect: first-term grades for how they managed that process. Certainly critics are emerging to mark in their grade books how effectively the district has built the high school and the equity, fairness and equality – if not redundant – with which its plans included Shelby County High School. We understand this feedback, and we think it is useful.

  • We continue to hear the buzz that Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger might be dipping his toes fairly deeply into gubernatorial waters.

    You’ve no doubt read the reports that Mr. Rothenburger says he is exploring a run for the Republican nomination against Gov. Steve Beshear next November, and you may also have noted that his political partners and counterparts alike in Shelby County have encouraged such a venture.

  • I take the headline for today’s column from the 1963 movie of the same name. That movie, which I’m happy to recommend, featured a cast that was a virtual who’s who of the stars of that day, including Spencer Tracy, Milton Berle, Ethel Merman, Sid Caesar, Buddy Hackett, Mickey Rooney and Jonathan Winters.

    The plot involves the dying words of a thief, which spark a crazy, cross-country race to find a hidden treasure.