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Opinion

  • We can pull out a familiar old term from the unabridged dictionary of our minds this week and reintroduce it to our daily vernacular after an, oh, 35-year absence.

    This etymological re-entry will become official Friday night at Collins High School Stadium, where cross-town rival – yes, that’s the word – Shelby County comes a-calling, as Cawood used to say.

    Rivalry.

  • I have an elderly aunt who not long ago confided something very important to me.

    “I like what you write,” she said, “except I don’t care much about sports.”

    Well, Carroll, I have to apologize, but sometimes my roots in the dirt of diamonds, the creaky basketball courts and the trees, sand and water of golf courses sometimes fight their way past the topsoil of today’s world and push fresh shoots that must be nourished with a few organic sentences from the compost pile within me.

  • We have but days remaining until Election Day, and we’re sure the candidates will be almost as glad as we are when the votes are counted.

    We have to say almost because those who fail to capture the most votes certainly won’t be pleased that the race is finished.

    But we do believe they would admit they need a few moments to sit back and relax, that they are as tired as they can be.

  • When I heard they were tearing down Showcase Cinemas, the old complex on Bardstown Road in Louisville, I shook my head with a sadness that usually is reserved for when a church or a school or something ancient and irreplaceable was being razed rather than just an outdated theater that hadn’t been open for years.

    But in its own relatively less relevant way, the Showcase was, well, a showcase, even before it exactly bore that name.

  •  Shelby Trails is on a happy trail to opening. The Shelby County Parks Board officially dedicated its new park on Sunday afternoon at a ceremony that included appropriately included a horseback ride.

    Roger and Diane Shott, those wonderful people who donated the 400-plus acres of rolling farmland to the public good, were there in Todds Point to hear praises and receive plaques.

  • There remain two weeks in the campaign season, but we have been wonderfully and pleasantly pleased this fall that the candidates running for office in Shelby County have stuck to their guns on issues and kept down the flapping of their gums on each other.

  • This has been a rather difficult athletic season for Shelby County High School.

    The Rockets are not soaring as they usually have, and most of their head-to-head match-ups with new rival Collins have not gone well.

    But then last week a group of young girls from SCHS played their way into the state golf tournament and contended admirably and bravely for a championship.

  • If you’ve passed recently any intersection of the Shelbyville Bypass, you likely have been amazed and even a bit mystified at the level of work being done on our incomplete roadway.

    There are clouds of dust, lined up personnel and equipment and just a general beehive of movement – almost any hour of the day and even on the weekend – that is at once heartwarming and blood-boiling.

  • There remains a little less than a month until Election Day, and it can’t arrive too soon for us.

    We realize candidates have messages to spread and that voters have decisions to make.

    But, frankly, we think both those processes are being lost in the bombardment of mud that smacks firmly against the sides of our heads nearly every day.

  • You may have read in recent weeks about the number of industries in Shelby County that are trying to become increasingly green.

    We know that the report in last week’s Sentinel-News was only a sampling of what is going on in our manufacturing areas, but we were heartened to see so much anecdotal evidence that our industries want to help the environment.

  • For many years, in many places and for many reasons, I have stood in front of my television screen on Derby Day and unabashedly shed a tear when My Old Kentucky Home was sung.

    Like most of my generation, I learned the words – the original ones, I might add – in grade school and have burned them into those vocal tracks of my soul, to be plucked and tweaked on an occasional basis in an emotional serenade of my essence.

  • Last weekend my family went camping.

    Now, I am aware that there are those who love the great outdoors. For those people, the sights, sounds and smells of nature are the closest things to heaven on earth that they can find.

    There are those that love to camp in tents, to be at one with creation, to go to sleep with the sound of the crickets and frogs in their ears and wake to the feel of the dewy grass under their feet.

  • Shelby County lost another one of its quieter but more influential residents this past week.

    Henry Cleveland may have been known as an affable mailman, a documentary photographer and a God-fearing friend to many residents, but to Shelby County he was all those things and more.

    Mr. Cleveland has helped record the history of our county, taking images of its people and places and collecting them as a valuable and irreplaceable archive.

  • The report card overall this past week for Shelby County Public Schools was pretty good: A solid B, we would offer.

    That’s not to say the slightly improved test scores on the elementary and middle school levels were all that significant. We aren’t convinced the standardized testing really matters in measuring education quite as much as we sometimes would be led to believe.

  • A couple of weeks ago we commended Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger for his thoughtful review of a bid to run for governor. Our position was – and remains – that we like to see Shelby Countians step forward and seek h

  •  Five years ago today – and as I type the word “five” I shudder to conceive all that has happened since – I woke up sleeping in the back of my pickup truck.

  •  If you missed last Monday’s Taste & Tunes put on by the Shelby County Chamber of Commerce, you missed a lot of fun and great food.

  •  Many years ago, when I was a young reporter working in Jackson, Miss., I wrote an editorial on a sports opinion page about a new stadium lease agreement the Jackson Mets were seeking with the City of Jackson.

    In those six or eight paragraphs, all well-developed logic that prodded the city to get in the game, I included one very large and significant error in the way I stated the percentage of increase the city was seeking.

  • A preacher came across a small group of boys who had circled around a small dog and were talking among themselves. “What are you boys…”

    We interrupt this regularly-scheduled column to bring you an update from the mad, mad, mad world of political correctness.

  • We have heard at last from the folks at Kay and Kay Contracting. At least we think we have.