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Opinion

  •     The athletes at Martha Layne Collins High School are going to be a bit safer this summer.

    Because of the power of the name of the new high school’s namesake and an opportunity created by a committed parent, those who play sports at Collins during the summer heat will be provided with so-called “hot

  • The Shelbyville Horse Show, judged by tourism officials to be one of the 10 best summer events in Kentucky, lived up to its reputation again this past weekend.

    Under sunny if steamy skies – a nice change from a year ago – the show’s 21st annual edition brought in nice crowds and amazing animals.

  • I have previously listed in this column what I consider the two most important truths in the universe: 1) There is a God, and 2) You’re not Him.

    Today I would like to offer this corollary truth: God is BIG, and we are small.

    Many have undertaken to explain exactly how big God is. One old preacher said it this way, “God is so big He bumps into Himself.”

    That’s pretty big.

  • That was quite a drug bust out near Southville this past week.

    The Shelby County Sheriff’s Office and the Kentucky State Police task force that worked together to take a million dollars worth of marijuana and thousands of dollars in ill-gotten cash out of circulation in Shelby County is most commendable.

  • The man calling the radio show said he was visiting Mount Hood in Oregon. It was 4:45 a.m. there, and he said the temperature was in the 50s.

    He said the high on Monday was 85, but the heat index was 70, meaning wind chill was at play, as were snowboarders and skiers who ventured to the summit of the mountain, about 12,000 feet up.

  • The deadline is less than a week away for the final slate of candidates for this year’s General Election, and we’re concerned that the list of those interested in public service won’t grow at all.

    The races for Simpsonville City Commission and the Shelby County School Board are drawing far less attention than they did in 2008. No new blood or – worse – new ideas have emerged.

  • The handwriting is on the wall, and we think one of our organizations has an idea that just might provide the eraser.

    We’re talking about the problem with graffiti – and trashy areas, in general – in Shelby County.

    Shelby Prevention can’t necessarily prevent the problem, but the organization certainly can try to generate an effort to wipe it out. And that’s what it plans to do.

  • In an effort to argue that religious freedom is under attack in our country, Chuck Souder of Shelby Christian Church used the recent Supreme Court ruling in favor of Hastings College of Law (Christian Legal Society v. Martinez) to illustrate his charge (“Yes, America, you’ve come a long way, baby,” July 9).

    I found his explanation of this ruling rather strange, since he neglected to mention the central issue in the case and managed generally to distort the ruling and its effects.

  • The news for Citizens Union Bank seems more dark today, and we fear that darkness might be obscuring a very key process for all of us.

    In the wake of what seemed an announcement to celebrate – the naming of two willing new chairs for CUB’s boards – came the discordant drop of a lawsuit from former CEO Billie Wade.

  • In a county that is woefully underrepresented by African-Americans in its leadership positions – School Board Chair Brenda Jackson is the only truly public figure – we embrace those who step forward, who share ideas and commitment, as touchstones for all.

    And today we celebrate the accomplishments of two people with good ideas.

  • In my last column, I brought attention to a recent Supreme Court decision in which the court upheld the University of California's Hastings College of Law’s decision to refuse to recognize officially a Christian Legal Society (CLS) chapter because CLS requires its members to adhere to a statement of faith.

  • The Humane Society’s new headquarters looks like a pretty hopping place.

    There are hundreds – perhaps thousands – of unwanted animals in need of care and treatment in Shelby County, and the society through its private fund-raising and a generous donation for Shelby County Fiscal Court now has a facility that should help address those needs.

  • We applaud the members of the Class of 2010 as they stride confidently into the future.

    This last unified graduating class of Shelby County always will hold an historical place, and it set an outstanding example for all that follow.

    These seniors excelled in academics, leadership and volunteerism.

    They were recognized with more than $2 million in scholarships and grants.

    They are attending more than 40 different colleges and secondary schools.

  • You may have heard country singer Miranda Lambert describe in her sweet and twangy voice the story of “The House That Built Me.”

    She tells of knocking on the door of the home where she grew up and explaining to the person who answers about how she learned life in the building’s nooks and crannies and yard, where she learned music and buried her dog.

  • Because we celebrated the 234th birthday of our country this week, I thought it an appropriate time to look back at the kind of nation our Founding Fathers set out to establish compared to where we are today.

  • One of our fellow residents has seen a dangerous situation and has done something about it.

    He won’t admit that or take credit, because that might not be culturally appropriate in his organization. But we can see the difference his efforts have made.

    We speak of Tim Wafford, supervisor of the state highway garage in Shelby County.

  • Shelby County has been blessed in a tight budget year to have earned more than $17 million in road improvements from the state.

    We must thank state Sen. Gary Tapp (R-Shelbyville) and state Rep. Brad Montell (R-Shelbyville) for their hard work in pushing these projects through not only federal stimulus specifications but the state’s myriad approvals, too.

  • We read these reports and get evermore ill, not just for the images they create but for the law that allows them to occur. In the past week, two men riding 2-wheel vehicles on county roads have been involved in serious accidents when they weren’t wearing helmets. One of them died, and the other almost did. Both of them might be walking around today if not for collisions involving their 2-wheel vehicles and taking the full force of traumatic impact on their unprotected skulls. We won’t paint the full image, but you know how it

  • Quick, the title of this week’s column is a quote from: A) the President, telling us how far into debt he plans to take us; B) the weatherman, telling us how high the temperature will go tomorrow, or C) a famous cartoon character?

    If you guessed ‘C’, you are correct, and ready to play today’s game. We begin today with a test of your knowledge of famous movie lines. Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to determine who said the following lines.

  • Chicken Little seems to be alive and well and living in Shelby County.

    At least that is what we fear.

    Those weather sirens that have been blaring away recently in late-evening and early-morning hours are supposed to tell us the sky is falling, but so far they have proven to be nothing but, yes, false alarms.