.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • More good economic news arrived Thursday when state economic development officials approved tax incentives for expansion projects at Katayama American Co. and Shelby Industries.

    On top of the hot fudge sundae that was the earlier announcement at Martinrea Heavy Stamping, these are two plump and tasty cherries.

    That the companies received the incentives and will add, between them, more than 30 new jobs in the next year is wonderful news. These are opportunities for workers who have lost their jobs or maybe looking for new opportunities.

  • We hope you studied the drawings of what Mount Eden Road someday may look like.

    Maybe you even took the time to attend Tuesday night’s meeting when engineers and transportation officials were available to answer questions.

    This road project is a very important step for Shelby County and Shelbyville – and we don’t say this simply because vehicles will be able to traverse the road more efficiently and safely.

  • The Evans family of Simpsonville has been on a mission for years – to memorialize the giving spirit of their daughter Hanna, who died tragically at age 6 of a rare form of cancer.

    Now their efforts have taken a significant new step that is a lesson for what all of us can do.

    The family has taken out a $1 million life insurance policy and made Kosair Children’s Hospital the beneficiary.

  • To see the big show in town this week, you will have to drive to Taylorsville.

    And, nothing against our brethren to the south, but this seems the wrong direction for Shelby County’s new direction.

    In case you missed the news, for the first time since 1975, two high schools in Shelby County will meet Thursday night in a basketball tournament game, when Shelby County and Collins high schools collide in a 30th District Tournament semifinal.

  • The members of our General Assembly appear fixated this term on the idea that they must provide some antidote to the problem of illegal immigration, which is a topical and touchy issue for so many Shelby Countians.

    Two different bills are working their way through the enactment process – the Senate passed its version in January, and the House is doing its part now – and state Rep. Brad Montell (R-Shelbyville) has said he believes some sort of measure will come to a full vote.

  • What a wonderful concept it was on Saturday night when all the animal support organizations of Shelby County came together for a unified fund-raising events, Monarchs, Mutts and Meows.

    That catchy title – and headliner entertainment – aside, this was a landmark occurrence when the collective power of these niche organizations brought in a crowd so large that some may have had to be turned away.

  • On Monday we will celebrate the births of two of America’s most renown presidents: George Washington, who couldn’t screw up a job for which no one had any expectations, and Abraham Lincoln, who dared to allow a nation to screw itself up in order to set it on course to purge itself of crimes against mankind.

    Despite those who disagreed with their views, their tactics and even their legacies, these men are the icons against whom all subsequent presidents are measured.

  • On Monday we will celebrate the births of two of America’s most renown presidents: George Washington, who couldn’t screw up a job for which no one had any expectations, and Abraham Lincoln, who dared to allow a nation to screw itself up in order to set it on course to purge itself of crimes against mankind.

    Despite those who disagreed with their views, their tactics and even their legacies, these men are the icons against whom all subsequent presidents are measured.

  • We are extremely pleased to learn that so much momentum is gathering to improve the deadly ramp onto Interstate 64 eastbound at Exit 32.

    We were overjoyed to see state Rep. Brad Montell (R-Shelbyville), current and former state Sen. Paul Hornback and Gary Tapp and Magistrate Tony Carriss and other elected leaders press their influential feet squarely on the accelerator pedal that has powered the state forward toward an immediate remedy to a dangerous, longstanding problem.

  • We are extremely pleased to learn that so much momentum is gathering to improve the deadly ramp onto Interstate 64 eastbound at Exit 32.

    We were overjoyed to see state Rep. Brad Montell (R-Shelbyville), current and former state Sen. Paul Hornback and Gary Tapp and Magistrate Tony Carriss and other elected leaders press their influential feet squarely on the accelerator pedal that has powered the state forward toward an immediate remedy to a dangerous, longstanding problem.

  • People who have spent a lot of time in Shelby County are finding their places on stage these days – and it’s center stage, at that.

    First there was Jennifer Lawrence, whose family owns a business in Shelby County, being nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress at the ripe old age of 20 for her role in the acclaimed Winter’s Bone.

    Then there is Brandi Neelly, who learned a lot of her singing in Shelby County, advancing on American Idol. She’s all of 16.

  • There’s a canyon-sized gap in our high school curriculum that has become overwhelmingly obvious: Some of our children don’t know the meaning of the words “commit” or “commitment.”

    We speak, of course, of those elite among our students who have displayed such athletic prowess that they are a human commodity for our nation’s colleges and universities.

  • Were you salivating last week when you read that Denny’s soon will open in Waddy?
    Were you ready to invest the required 20 miles and gallon of gas most of us would have to spend to get your Grand Slam breakfast?
    Maybe you were like me and you weren’t so much salivating in your taste buds as you were ruefully twisting  your head with the flash-fried realization that that Shelby County has reached an epicurean epoch we might never have anticipated.

  • What a great jolt of positive energy that was for our county last week with the news that the state was approving incentives to help Martinrea Heavy Stamping get a toehold with Ford for its new Vertrek product line.
    This not only helps ensure a large employer that had been down to its dying breaths will breathe longer, but it means that 150 new employees will join the fold, many of them, we would presume, workers who had lost their jobs in the litany of cutbacks the company has endured during the past few years.

  • When it comes to fire safety, stop, drop and roll has been for decades a part of the educational download on safety that our schools evangelize. Parents in turn drill that slogan into the ears and minds of our kids – along with other safety practices, of course (re: stop, look and listen)  – so that when a fire breaks out, they know how to handle themselves.
    Now we give you 14-year-old Wyatt Brookshire, who knew a bit more about how to handle a fire than the lessons he learned in elementary school.

  • Don’t you get the feeling sometimes that we are a society that honors each other when honor is the element that should be honored?
    Or – and I’ll translate here – don’t you feel that we have so many awards events that they never seem to end, that they go end-to-end like a run of dominoes that never seems to bump into the double blanks?
    You sense that there is an award for everything, and a show for every award.

  • Through a report last week to the Shelby County School Board, we now understand that our children are eating healthier at school than we might have expected.
    Shelby County Public Schools appear to be ahead of the new federal guidelines that are being handed down – guidelines that we believe are much needed in feeding kids who too often prefer a meal to be a soft drink and some French fries – and we find that to be a delicious concept.

  • The report to Shelby County Fiscal Court last week that Shelby County’s Emergency Management Agency is performing among the best in the state illuminates a very important aspect of our community.
    All of us depend on Director Charlie Frazee, Deputy Director Paul Whitman and all those affiliated with EMA to keep us informed and safe during times of danger and difficulty.
    It’s comforting to understand that we are being cared for by some of the best in Kentucky.

  • So often we address issues involving our roads and raise questions that don’t bring us immediate or sufficient answers, much less remedies to the problems at hand.
    But today we have to give credit for the most recent decision from the state highway department, though some of you believe this solution seemed to be moving in the slow lane. At least it did arrive at the right destination in a relatively timely manner.