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Opinion

  • In communities across the nation, cemeteries are dying.
    That’s what happens when the living fail to honor, preserve and restore their local cemeteries. It’s also the result when cemetery boards fail to keep the cemetery alive and vital by investing in surrounding property for the future and providing opportunities for the living to honor and preserve the resting place of the dead.
    Grove Hill Cemetery in the center of Shelby County is alive and well.

  • Citizens in Mount Eden, on both sides of the Shelby and Spencer county lines, are putting up the good fight against what ultimately may be the most overpowering opponent other than death that any of us will face: the United States government.
    They fear – and with good cause – that they will lose their venerable post office to the aggressive cost-cutting plan that the United States Postal Service is employing to combat the diminishing income of its once great monopoly.

  • It should be automatic to celebrate the quick and forthright repairs made to the intersection of U.S. 60 and KY 55, a problem area long before the opening of the Shelbyville Bypass and an excruciatingly worse one since.
    State transportation officials responded purposefully to the public outcry generated through these pages and escalated with the firm voices of state Rep. Brad Montell (R-Shelbyville) and retired state Sen. Gary Tapp (R-Shelbyville).

  • For the first time in nearly four decades, Shelby County Public Schools graduated two classes of  seniors on Saturday.
    Though these teenagers traversed the threshold from child/student to adult in a simple march across a podium and in the gentle grasp of an administrator’s hand, the final understanding of how far they have come, how much they learned and can accomplish, won’t be on life’s diploma until, oh, a few decades from now.

  • I was in Freedom Hall the night Anderson County played for the state basketball championship. It was the place where I heard Muhammad Ali say he wanted to fight George Foreman and Joe Frazier on the same night.

    I saw Julius Erving, then of the Virginia Squires, do things with a basketball that I had never seen and still can't describe. I have been to several concerts there, and I watched Richie Farmer make string music at the state finals 23 years ago.

  • An old colleague, basketball executive, author and many times Boston Marathoner Pat Williams, used to open speeches by saying:
    “I’m going to speak first to those of you who are smokers, in as much as you have less time to live than the rest of us.”

    And today I am addressing you smokers.

    But this isn’t a pray-for-you evangelism about the evils of inhaling the incineration of an unctuous weed whose fumes are so toxic that they do nothing but spread death through your body.

  • This Saturday more than 400 seniors will gather for commencements at Shelby County and Collins high schools in celebrations of accomplishment defined by perseverance, commitment and pursuit of excellence.

    Many of them will have exceeded expectations and withstood obstacles great and small to achieve their levels of success. Some will have created a legacy for academic excellence that will stand for their rest of their lives. Others will be happy just to be there.

  • Something tells us this won’t be the last time we congratulate Caterina Karas for winning a state championship.

    Karas, a junior at Collins, in November captured the first state championship silver for the Titans’ new trophy case by running away with the cross-country championship, and on Thursday she added two more baubles by winning her events at the state track & field meet.

    Her victories in the 1,600- and 3,200-meter runs – that’s the metric mile and 2-mile runs – in one meet is a fabulous feat of feet.

  • Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science at Western Kentucky University will enroll its third student from Shelby County Public Schools when the 2011-2012 school year begins next fall.

    Sam Saarinen, a sophomore at Shelby County High School, has been selected for the incoming junior class and for the 2013 graduating class. Sam, the son of Tim and Anne Saarinen is following in the footsteps of Chris Obermeyer, who is now at Duke University, and Katherine Goebel, who graduates this spring.

  • Were you like me around dinnertime on Saturday evening? Did you look at the clock and wonder?
    Surely I wasn’t left behind, was I?
    After all, radio evangelist Harold Camping had been saying that the Rapture would begin at 6 p.m. Saturday, that a series of Heavenly orchestrated earthquakes would crash across the country and that we all would be headed Home.
    Well, some of us.
    Certainly, if that had happened, I was hoping to be included.

  • Only a week has passed since the final slate was established for this fall’s governor’s election, and already we are concerned about how this race will play out in the next 168 days.
    Incumbent Democrat Steve Beshear and Republican David Williams appear to have taken off the gloves before they officially had them on, and independent Gatewood Galbraith is somewhere out there trying to get people to understand that he really is a candidate.

  • We really like this new plan for 7th Street. We like the idea that our leaders are taking steps to improve an important corridor for the value of Shelbyville and for the quality of life for Shelby Countians.
    We like the idea of the new roundabout to enter the Clear Creek Park, and we like the new, uncrumbled sidewalks on both sides of the street.
    We like the idea of painting the railroad overpass and of redeveloping some of the vacant and decaying property around it.

  • This letter, signed by the 2011 senior class at Shelby County High School, was submitted for publication by Lane Taylor.

     

    Rockets say “thanks but no thanks” to the arrogance parade at graduation.

  • He called out, “Brother Collins!” This was my first interruption during a worship service in 18 years of ministry. I was surprised, to say the least.

    It was Easter, 1978. We were celebrating the resurrection of Jesus Christ at the First Christian Church. The music was fantastic, the scripture and sermon were inspiring, and the hymn of invitation brought nine people to the front of the sanctuary.

  • It’s prom season, as the parent of any high school student – or at least that parent’s wallet – likely knows quite well.

    Shelby County’s prom was Friday in the select and sensational Seelbach Hotel. Collins will celebrate this week at the magnifique and munificent Muhammad Ali Center.

    And we extend poverty-line pity for the family who has to pay the tab for a teenager who has a paramour attending the other school, because that’s a deep double-dip in the pocket.

  • Shelby County Public Schools officials say the decision is final about how graduating seniors will be seated for  graduation. They are moving on with their plans to eliminate seating the top students in ranking order and talking to them individually about that  plan.

    Seniors from Shelby County High School have submitted through a letter their feeling that the change is good and welcome. They, too, it seems, have moved on.

    But we don’t think most people are ready to move on.

  • One decision SCPS got right was the selection of Frances Fonza as its top teacher for this year.

    There are dozens of dedicated, talented and worthy teachers in our school system, but Ms. Fonza has stood out to us for years not only because she has drawn beautiful music from the throats of our students but because she has gone beyond vocal chords to produce good and talented human beings for the world.

  • A sunny Run for the Roses is always a great day to be a Kentuckian, but that glare on our old Shelby County homes Saturday was even a bit brighter than usual.

    That’s because for the first time in decades we had someone local to root home, a personal chunk of us, a force to steal inside us and transform all those generic impulses of pride and emotion into true partisanship.

  • We are pleased to see that the conversation about whether the Ten Commandments should be posted in our state and federal offices has elevated and remained rational.
    Whether you are a proponent or opponent of these tenets being displayed, you have to feel good about a touchstone topic being brought to the public fore and the issue debated openly through our shared freedom.
    For all laws – all planks of the construction of our government – were built on your simple right to do that: disagree.

  • Jon Court didn’t ride off with the roses at the Kentucky Derby on Saturday, but he is nevertheless a winner.
    His perseverance, his patience, his talent and his character shone beneath a strong spotlight in Louisville last week, and for that we congratulate him.
    Winning horse races, games, political campaigns, agricultural competitions and even beauty pageants all take talent, poise and commitment.