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Opinion

  • You may recall a few weeks ago when I hand-wringingly admitted a periodic paranoia about bridges, especially those that are high and narrow or creakily cross creeks.

    So you may understand that I see terrible irony – and not simply coincidence, language fans – in the fact that we now face two similar and simultaneous problems with bridges.

    There is, of course, the historic and embraceable (work with me) Who Da Thot It Bridge here in Shelbyville and now the Sherman Minton Bridge just up I-64 at the Ohio River.

  • We were appalled to observe last week that Shelby County Fiscal Court would not accept comments from those in attendance who wanted to address an important zoning matter it is considering for final approval.

    At issue is the controversial reclassification of approximately 10 acres on Kentucky Street to heavy industrial to allow Midwest Metals to build a recycling plant that would be adjacent to Red Orchard Park and residential neighborhoods.

  • There has been an abundance of appropriate attention focused this past week on the first responders who faced peril and sometimes gave their lives during the tragic attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

    At ceremonies in New York, Washington and in a field in Pennsylvania the heroes of that awful day of attacks on America have earned the often prayerful and always prideful praise of society for all they contributed, for the lives they saved and for the ultimate sacrifice that so many made.

  • Not even a “thank you” to the taxpayers of Shelby County.
    The citizens of Shelby County need to wake up and take notice of the total disregard our current school board has for the anxiety most taxpayers feel about our financial future. We should be outraged and disgusted by what took place at the Aug. 25 school board meeting.

  • It’s hard to say park and scrap metal recycling plant in the same sentence. It would be harder yet to live with a recycling plant in the same block as a park. Even if we can’t have a voice at the 10 a.m., Sept. 20, Shelby County Fiscal Court meeting, we can have a presence and that might help our magistrates keep the facts for their decision in focus.

  • As I traveled across Kentucky over the past several weeks, meeting with constituents and hearing their concerns, one overriding issue became clear: People are concerned that our stagnant economy is not turning around. With unemployment in the commonwealth at 9.5 percent and the recent news that not a single net new job was created in the country last month, they’re right to be worried.

  • This is the week for one of those winding, emotional and reflective cruises down the turbulent tributaries that feed those endless eddies stirred by a life-changing event.

    We don’t simply glance over our shoulders at the rapids that changed our course, but we stare at it, consume it anew and bring from our deep-sealed memories the emotions, the adrenalin that carried us through those waters to our anchorage of today.

  • The concept being extended by longtime Shelby County native Joe Ruble to build an iconic statue of Squire Boone on the east end of Shelbyville is another significant and – we think – embraceable piece of entrepreneurship by a citizen who loves Shelby County and revels in its history.

  • We love the Kentucky State Fair for many reasons, but one is that we just love seeing our friends and neighbors getting ribbons and prizes for doing what they love most to do.

    This is a time when dedication to talents and hobbies brings attention from everyone, when great cooking, a cool drawing, a beautiful quart of honey, a composed heifer, a perfect bale of hay and, of course, a studly and elegant horse draw the eye of a state and perhaps a nation.

  • A  man and I were talking the other day about another lost teaching moment for young people.
    We reminisced about how boys and girls are missing out on one of those annual activities that taught us so much about the challenges of life, about how we could face them, and, well, about nature, in a roundabout way.
    In fact, of the fundamentals taught to our dubious and dumbfounded dispositions, I might suggest this endeavor had perhaps the greatest impact on our development this side of a hug or a switch, though hardly anywhere close to that personal.

  • Your outcry for better accountability by our elected officials and your decry of almost any decision of a fiscal nature have become our foundations of public debate.

    You, the public, often challenge those you elected to do a better job, to listen to the needs of the citizens and not to those of special interests, corporations or other political influencers.

  • Collins High School...an opportunity for success.

    As one drives up Discovery Boulevard, an impressive "green" school comes into view. Cross-country runners can be seen trotting over the sprawling rural campus. One also notices coaches and students from various teams sharing fields and making the best of a challenging situation. The band beats out cheerful tunes in the parking lot.

    If one enters the school, they quickly notice pictures on the wall proudly

    displaying last year’s Governor Scholar recipients. Three more will join them

  • Many of you may have noticed the recent media blitz sponsored by nearly 10,000 law enforcement agencies nationwide aimed at impaired driving known as “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over.”

    This campaign, which officially kicked off on Aug. 19, continues through this Labor Day.

    The statistics demonstrating the need for this type of campaign are not very difficult to locate.

    While data shows that alcohol-impaired-driving fatalities across the country have declined by almost 8 percent in the last year, the numbers are still extremely high.

  • As one drives onto the boulevard leading to the Collins High School campus, all seems well.
    A short while later, the observant person notices large quantities of grass clippings all over the road. Weeds and grass are growing in the cracks of the asphalt and concrete, which in the present state will do irreparable harm to both if not corrected quickly.
    The lack of maintenance will allow the weeds to punch holes in the side of the asphalt and therefore create another outlandish expense for the school. The flower beds all around the school are consumed with weeds.

  • There’s a high probability that you never met Clarence Miller, though you may well recognize the name. And, if so, his passing last week stole from you and from us an opportunity to know and embrace Mr. Miller’s significant accomplishment and his keen sense of community.
    We often measure a death by the legacy that remains, and with Clarence Miller that legacy is both large and long, his sense of his fellow man and his county both outstanding and exemplary.

  • Two recent news reports sadly have merged to bring home with a new and powerful impact an issue that for decades has been troubling not only for the residents of Shelby County but for many across the state and the nation: criminal activity among illegal immigrants.

  • There was a mysterious presence in the air over Shelby County last week.
    It hovered over neighborhoods, flew low from one end of the county to the other, and landed in the field on the back of a farm, separated from homes only by groves of mature trees.
    It seemed to hang in the air like one of Tiger Woods’ tee-shots used to do, and then sort of drift along the horizon like some oversized dragon fly.
    It drew people from their homes and toward those trees and fields. It lit up the phone lines and fired up Facebook.

  • The mission of our school district is reflected in our ultimate Big Goal – graduate by 2016 all students meeting college and career readiness benchmarks. I would like those in the community to be able to discuss the goals with students, friends, family and neighbors.

    But I also hope that understanding the goals helps you to gain insight into the purpose of our work in Shelby County Public Schools this school year.

  • Shelby County Fiscal Court is moving quickly this week to close the Who Da Thot It Bridge – commonly called Jail Hill Bridge – that historic span connecting downtown Shelbyville north from 5th Street. In fact, even as you read this, the bridge already may be closed.

    Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger cited a recent inspection of the bridge by the state as his basis for asking magistrates on Tuesday morning for an executive order to close the bridge immediately as a matter of public safety.

  • Another successful Shelbyville Horse Show has finished its run, and by all accounts its 22nd edition may have been the biggest and best ever.

    Certainly large crowds turned out during the four days, despite sweltering heat, and the number of horses entered grew significantly, bringing in vans from as far away as Texas to compete against the best.