• We really like the fact that Shelby County High School created a day of basketball in honor of its most famous former player.

    The Mike Casey Classic, held for the first time this past Saturday, invited seven schools to join the Rockets for a day of basketball in the Mike Casey Gymnasium at SCHS.

    We commend Principal Eddie Oakley and Athletic Director Sally Zimmerman for having the commitment to Mr. Casey’s legacy to take forward their naming of the gym and court and building a showcase for the game he played with so much zeal and grace.

  • For years, when asked what I wanted for a Christmas gift, I offered the same canned but heartfelt item:
    Peace on earth and good will toward men.

    Could there be a better present than wanting the world to reach its serene and sincere summit? I mean, what could compare? A new Countess Mara (look it up) or a sleeve of Titleists or one of those hot cars so many folks in commercials seem to receive?

    No, I thought nothing under the tree could be greater – until now.

  • Why is shock probation part of the judicial landscape in Kentucky?

    There are only seven states that have such a program, which allow judges to release from prison convicted criminals – many of them felons – simply because they have faced the “shock” of life in a cell.

    Why does Kentucky’s having shock probation seem to be such a disservice to law enforcement, prosecutors and the judicial process in general?

  • There is a scene in the movie Fred Clausin which Fred (played by Vince Vaughn) is responsible for determining which child makes the Nice List or which child makes the Naughty List. The older brother of Santa Claus tires of the situation and the choice process, so he stamps each and every child as Nice, meaning each and every child receives what he or she wants.

    I must be Fred Claus.

  • When dollars are spent in Shelby County, they can in turn be invested locally, raising the overall level of economic activity, paying more salaries and building the local tax base. This recirculation of money leads to an increase of economic activity, with the degree of expanse entirely dependent on the percentage of money spent locally.

    Buying away from home means lost revenue for local businesses and your tax dollars going to support some other community. I refer to the lost of potential-local retail sales, as “retail leakage.”

  • In an era in which the true meaning of Christmas takes more punches to the jaw than Muhammad Ali landed on Joe Frazier in their third fight, I offer you the biggest, most powerful haymaker ever to be thrown:

    Black Friday.

    Is there anything that says less about the spirit of Christmas than Black Friday?

    Even the coined name is repugnantly ruinous to that spirit: Black Friday.

  • The plea for pieces of information that law enforcement officials owe Shelby Countians has become sadly and amazingly more complex these past few weeks.

    We want to know answers to our questions, and we want to know them now – although we now understand that such demands aren’t always simple.

    First, there was the horrible beating of Denisse Escareno, found by the side of Mount Eden Road in the middle of a Saturday afternoon.

  • It was another banner season of fall high school sports in Shelby County, and our congratulatory notes have to be delivered first to the person who finished first.

    Last year we praised the accomplishment of Caterina Karas to bring the first state title to Collins High School, and now we have to offer the same plaudits for the performance that brought the schools’ second: her sister, Gabbie, who beat Caterina to win the Kentucky Class AA Girls Cross-Country Meet earlier this month in Lexington.

  • The agonizing pain of a tragic situation is eating at Shelbyville today, sending a corrosiveness coursing through the bloodstream that connects a tight-knit community and a strong family.

    The death on Saturday of Trey F. Williams, 18, during an altercation with two Shelbyville Police officers that went horribly wrong has created a open wound of pain that threatens to seep beyond the aggrieved in this horrible situation and into all our relationships.

  • The continued consideration by the Shelby County School Board of expanding to all elementary- and middle-school students a pilot program for learning Spanish appears to us to be a waste of time.

    Because there should be no pause in implementing this expansion.

    Shelby County’s increasing diversity, the role of Spanish in the world’s culture and the opportunity for students to be immersed in its intricacies at an early age make this a simple decision.

  • I saw the front-page headline in The Sentinel-Newson Friday (Nov. 18), and I was deeply troubled.

    PROBLEM 1: The front page is misleading.

    What was the overt message of Friday’s front page? There are several ways to read that page.

  • What will you say on Thursday? What will cross your heart and your lips and spill out from your soul onto the dinner table like so much runaway gravy?

    Thanksgiving is the day when more of us express their truest, innermost feelings more openly and freely than at any other time of the year.

    We may express surprise and elation at Christmas, love on Valentine’s Day, reverence on Easter and respect on a parental day, but Thanksgiving…well, isn’t it built on our best emotions?

  • Congress has an opportunity this week to make a historic decision that would permanently change the culture of spending in Washington. Our nearly $15 trillion of accumulated debt is a threat to our nation’s economic recovery, our national security and the welfare of future generations.

    We have already succeeded in changing the debate in Washington from “How much can we spend?” to “How much can we cut?” Now, we must go even further and pass a Balanced Budget Amendment.

  • They gathered there, at midfield of a football stadium, before more than 100,000 witnesses. They joined hands, oversized men in black, white and red. Their loyalties and potential animosity had been deposited on their sidelines.

    Their heads were bowed, and they were praying.

  • We now know that Steve Beshear gets another four years to run Kentucky. An overwhelming plurality of statewide voters thought he had done a good enough job to deserve an encore.

    And there also was a strong endorsement in Shelby County, which was a small surprise considering that Republicans have dominated the top-of-the-ticket races among our voters for the past few elections.

  • We love the holiday season and all that it represents. We are glad so many in our county embrace that season and present many wonderful opportunities to celebrate. But we have a suggestion:

    The Celebration of Lights is celebrated too early.

    This community festival, the county’s largest, is a wonderful event to bring the public to downtown Shelbyville, to erect the city’s Christmas tree and to light up the season.

    But we think its scheduling nearly two weeks before Thanksgiving is out of perspective.

  • ne of my favorite movie quotes comes at the end of Robert Redford’s A River Runs Through It– based on the book by Norman Maclean – “The river was cut by the world's great flood and runs over rocks from the basement of time. On some of the rocks are timeless raindrops. Under the rocks are the words, and some of the words are theirs. I am haunted by waters.”

  • From A to Z, or perhaps Antiques to Zebrafish, you can find gifts in Shelby County for nearly everyone on your holiday shopping list. A wide variety of items that are sure to please and surprise a friend or relative are yours for the looking.

    And the looking is just part of the fun of shopping Shelby County businesses.

    Unique gifts can be found in businesses housed in intimate historical downtown buildings as well as large modern businesses that have sprung up throughout the county.

  • The footing on the course for repairing the multipurpose athletic field at Collins High School appears to be as unsure as it would be for an athlete or band member who might try to play on its ineffective and dangerous artificial surface.

    In fact, the plan for that repair seems to be changing so rapidly, we aren’t sure that the contractor, Whittenberg Construction, and Shelby County Public Schools are reading from the same page at the same time.

  • Veterans Day took on a new meaning for me a few years ago.

    As a child of the Vietnam Era, I admired and feared for those who took up arms for our country, but being a timid little country boy, I shamefully admit that I wasn’t real keen on participating.

    Perhaps admiration and guilt combine to form my odd interest in fiction and films about World War II, maybe they are  why I’ve read The Winds of War/War & Remembrance six times and watched the miniseries of the latter nearly that many times.