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Opinion

  • As I looked through my grandmother’s family Bible, I saw where our family was kin to many famous pioneers. And after reading further, I found out how much one of my cousins, Squire Boone, had done.

    Of the first white men who dared to enter “the dark and bloody ground” in the early 1770s, brothers Daniel and Squire were the only two to come back alive. They had lived in the Radkin Valley in North Carolina. Squire was born in Pennsylvania.

  • State Rep. Brad Montell (R-Shelbyville) has introduced two bills to the Kentucky legislature that put forth very specific agendas concerning our public schools. One bill, BR116, has the catchy title of “The Great Schools Tax Credit Bill” and the other is BR117, a bill creating charter schools.

  • A healthy business environment is a foundation for economic growth. Business provides the services and products consumers demand; and business creates the jobs people need. Business success fuels the tax base that allows government to provide the services citizens want. Business activity supports development of the quality of life we all want in the Shelby County Community.
    Creating the kind of community where business can succeed and grow is hard work and takes considerable planning and implementation – and it is serious business for your Chamber of Commerce.

  • I have escaped a scourge of Valentine’s Day that I had feared might stain my life.

    No one in my family received a “tattoo Valentine,” and I am forever grateful that their precious hides were spared.

    Now, I know those boxes I saw among the kids’ cards at a couple of stores this past weekend didn’t include needles and ink, but they did carry with them, I fear, an impression on delicate minds that was equally dangerous and potentially damaging.

  • We now have watched the troubling final frames of  Trey Williams’ life, heard the fuzzy words Shelbyville Police Officers Suzanna Marcum and Frank Willoughby exchanged with Mr. Williams and seen some of what they saw on that Saturday afternoon.

    But although we have studied that video, watched those final minutes unfold and read the accompanying transcripts, our picture remains equally cloudy and minus the understanding we had hoped we would have received.

  • I departed Dec. 26 for London, England, for an advertising class that lasted two weeks, but would also count as college credit for a course at UK.  As I knew absolutely no one else going on this trip, to say I was nervous would be an understatement.
    I woke up every morning at 7 a.m., which would be 2 am here.  I had a complimentary breakfast provided by one of London’s finest hotels.  I would then attend a 30-minute class with around 30 other students from 12 different other universities in the U.S.

  • Recently members of the Shelby County Board of Education met with our elected leaders and gave them quite an elementary lesson in public education’s most well-known subject: Your budget is killing us.

    That, of course, required no piece of post-graduate analysis for anyone elected to any office in this state or for parents who pay careful attention to how their children’s needs are being met by the annual outlay of tax dollars.

    The chants on both sides are loud, clear and enumerated with valid points, if not universal solutions.

  • Maybe you were watching the Super Bowl on Sunday with a heartfelt interest in whether the Giants or the Patriots won in what became a sensational and scintillating scenario.
    Maybe you, like most of the tens of millions who watched, were more interested in the overpriced and overdeveloped – and sometimes overly stupid – commercials that have become so famous.

  • The saga involving Midwest Metals’ desire to open a facility in Shelby County seems to be on the road to an appropriate conclusion, which leaves us to ponder why there was such an unnecessary detour along the way.

    Midwest Metals, the recycling company, earned approval from the Triple S Board of Appeals on Thursday night to construct its collection complex on Windhurst Way, basically across the street from the acreage set aside for the new Shelby County Convenience Center adjacent to the Shelby County Industrial Park.

  • Shawn Allen Jr., a junior at Shelby County High School, has spent these past few months getting to understand a process that most of us in the senior classes of life only barely can grasp.

    Mr. Allen since September has been a page for U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell as part of the Senate Page School program.

  • The price of a full-page ad in a local county paper costs an average exceeding $500. The Kentucky Medical Association has placed ads regarding “Identify Medical Doctors” in many local papers statewide. The total money spent by this organization on their recent smear campaign targeting non-medically degreed health-care providers probably totals thousands.

  • Unless you are a devotee of the man himself, you probably had to giggle a bit as I did when I heard Newt Gingrich say recently that he wanted to be nominated for president and challenge Barack Obama to a series of 3-hour, Lincoln-Douglas-style debates on the issues facing our country.

    Unless I miss my guess: Honest Abe, the founding Republican, and Short Steve got off a good guffaw from the Great Peanut Gallery in the sky as well.

  • The boy climbed to his seat high in Rupp Arena on Saturday, his every sense keen to the sights and sounds of this famed arena, a Mecca to which he was pilgrimaging for the first time.

    He had passed its outer lobby while visiting the Hyatt Regency Hotel, reading the signs, noting the doorways, but his only peeks inside were from the narrow views of pixilated formations on a variety of television screens.

  • Gov. Steve Beshear has placed the state transportation cabinet in the fast lane to save lives in Shelby County, and we could not be more grateful.

    His endorsement Monday of plans to move ahead with modifications for the abbreviated and lethal acceleration lane from KY 55 onto Interstate 64 eastbound in Shelby County is not to be underestimated in making these 300 feet of asphalt safer for all who encounter it.

  • The redistricting plans for the state’s House and Senate leaders appear to be complete, and Shelby County has avoided the dubious and unsavory slicing that has affected so many of the counties around us.

    You can’t imagine how important it is that state Rep. Brad Montell (R-Shelbyville) and state Sen. Paul Hornback (R-Shelbyville) continue to represent all Shelby Countians and not just those on one side of an arbitrarily selected road.

  • There is a new bandwagon to support public education. Seven organizations representing the full spectrum of elementary and secondary education in Kentucky have banded together to urge Gov. Steve Beshear and the General Assembly to reverse four years of state funding reductions to key services that support teaching and learning in the state’s public schools.

    Thank goodness. Public school officials cannot make the demand alone. Our voices for help need to be heard loud and clear, and the more people screaming the message, the more likely we will be heard.

  • Random ravings while wondering why Richie Farmer had more laptops in one year than our entire newspaper staff has had this decade….

     

    Gatewood Galbraith today probably is entering the great governor’s race in the sky, bringing his folksy charm and unusual but not ill-formed ideas to that great debate.

    Whether you thought Galbraith a lion or a loon, you have to admit he brought some luminance to Kentucky’s political world, which typically has all the color of a corpse.

  • We continue to find unusual the City of Shelbyville’s approach to a parcel of land it apparently wants within its boundaries.

    We speak of the roughly 73 acres owned by Shelby County Magistrate Allen Ruble and his brother Tom on the southwest corner of Harrington Mill Road and Freedom’s Way, aka the Shelbyville Bypass.

  • What a heart-warming story it was for a young woman whose bloodlines seep deep into Shelby County’s fabric to wear the sash of Miss Kentucky across the stages of Las Vegas last week.

    We speak of the Miss America pageant on Saturday and the heritage of Ann-Blair Thornton, who grew from the gene pool of the Borders family in Shelby County.

    Most of you know Bill and Ann Borders, part of the former ownership of Smith-McKenney Drug Co. Perhaps you know their children or even some of their grandchildren. Ann-Blair Thornton of Bowling Green is one of them.

  • Dear President Obama:

    If you are serious about being re-elected, the door of opportunity has been kicked as wide open as the Montana sky.

    This isn’t about your ideas for handling our continuing economic morass, the ever-threatening swagger of Iran, the everlasting war on terror in Afghanistan and ever however much you think we should spend on the military going forward.

    Those are important, impervious issues, to be sure, but they’re not your real opportunity.