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Opinion

  • One of the things we like most to do is to congratulate our young people on their success stories, and this is the time of year when that happens most frequently – with graduation, scholarships and the never-ending lists on Awards Night at our high schools.

    But on Friday night, in a stadium in Louisville, three Shelby Countians stepped forward and established themselves at the best at what they do against their peers from around the state.

  • In his address following the battle at Gettysburg, Kentucky native President Abraham Lincoln stated that we as Americans need “…to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced.”

  • The editorial (“Outlet mall plan will test us all,” May 9) in The Sentinel-News (Shelby County’s local paper) about the proposed outlet mall in Simpsonville (The Outlet Shoppes of Louisville) already seems to support this development as “progress” and implores: “We have to avoid the tragedy of lost opportunity.” How is progress and opportunity defined by building this outlet mall?

  • Kate Schaefer has won awards in art. Claire Schaefer has won awards in dance and beauty contests.

    They wish every student had the same opportunities, especially since Claire remembers only one time seeing children with special needs competing in a contest in which she participated.

    Their wish has come true because of their own efforts.

    These two sisters have worked out arrangements with the Shelby County Fair Board to have an art contest and a Miss Sensational Pageant for students identified with disabilities.

  • There remain many laps in the race for congress in House District 4, but no matter who wins at the polls on May 22, we get the distinct impression that Shelby Countians are going to lose.
    There are nine candidates – seven Republicans and two Democrats – vying for the seat held for four terms by Republican Geoff Davis, but even newer than those candidates is the presence of Shelby County in a congressional district that has its seat of power in the Northern Kentucky suburbs of Cincinnati.

  • Sophia Sanchez had one of those ideas that we love to praise.
    Ms. Sanchez, a student at Collins High School, decided that as a service project for her JROTC unit that she would set up boxes at each of the polling precincts on Primary Election Day so that voters could donate needed goods to the Shelby County Animal Shelter.

  • Recently a lawyer from the firm Neal & Davis wrote a few short paragraphs “About gun laws,” April 18) ranting about thanking the NRA for a Florida homicide being the "result" of a "stand your ground" law.

  • The chorus of public debate about the proposed outlet mall in Simpsonville is just getting warmed up for what promises to be a full-blown, 3-act opera, and we hope to avoid a tragic aria at the end.

    Anytime something large and new is projected to be positioned in an area that previously has been a pristine barrier of nature for residents and property owners, there almost always is an immediate cry that such a change would be a bad thing for those vested in an area.

  • Recently I heard the phrase “the new norm” being tossed around. I cannot specifically remember to what it was in reference, but I started thinking about what Shelby County Public Schools will look like when we meet our Big Goals: all fifth-graders going to middle school on grade level, all middle-schoolers going to high school on grade level and all students graduating college and career ready.

  • We see selfless acts frequently in Shelby County, but none has inspired us more profoundly than when we heard about the efforts of 12-year-old Jessica Carter.

    Maybe you saw the story about Jessica, a student at West Middle School. In 2009, after watching the movie The Blind Side and hearing the reaction of previously vagabond Michael Oher when he was presented with his very own bed, she was struck that there were other kids like Mr. Oher who didn’t have a place to sleep.

  • Dear Mom:

    That’s what I’ll call you here, though many of my friends and family may call you Mother or Mama or Momma or Madre or Ma or even something more formal. They may even call you by your name.

    But we all probably should call you angel, because without you, we would not exist.

    It’s not that you necessarily gave birth to us, it’s that you embraced us from the instant we met, gave us love, shelter, food and everything else essential to growing our lives.

  • In a world in which vicious vitriol is the vanguard of criticism, a hundred words could not have been more troubling, not because of what was said but because of what wasn’t said, what was missed, because of the emotion behind the letters and punctuation marks that came together to form the paragraphs.

    Because they made my point and missed my point.

  • Shelby County Magistrate Tony Carriss calls the eastbound merge lane from KY 55 onto Interstate 64 “the most dangerous transportation issue in our county.”

    And now, in the very near future, this dangerously short strip of asphalt will receive a new and presumably safer design as part of the new state roads budget.

    We had hoped this was coming, that the General Assembly would follow through on the hard work by state Rep. Brad Montell (R-Shelbyville), state Sen. Paul Hornback (R-Shelbyville) and retired state Sen. Gary Tapp before them.

  • We’re glad the American Saddlebred Horse Association and its members have settled their very public and divisive spat, one that threatened the stability of one of our key industries and its showplace facility at the Kentucky Horse Park.

    Though we had read the position papers and the court findings, we really never understood why there was a spat in the first place.

  • Just last week I had a local high school senior tell me how some students – black, white and Hispanic – were angry and dangerous. She said they believed the late Trey Williams had been killed by police officers because he was black. She said the high school administrators were puzzled by the escalation of tensions and misbehaviors. This young woman, teenager of one of our leading families, said adults needed to address the situation or “something bad is going to happen.”

  • I don’t have a dog in this fight, but now I can’t imagine that Mitt Romney has any more chance of carrying Shelby County on Election Day (either of them)  than Hooch does of of winning the Westminster Dog Show.

    That became cat-eyed clear when I read the other day for the first time the story of the Romney family’s dog and his ride atop the car on a family vacation.

    I realize many of you who doggedly follow the political pontifications already know all the leavings on this.

  • Shelby County Public Schools is facing a rather rare opportunity that has emerged at even a rarer time – a situation so unique that school officials should find it compulsory to use the situation to its best advantage.

    We speak of the five openings for principals – at Collins High School, East Middle and three elementary schools – that must be filled before the next school year, nearly half the principals employed by the district.

  • Is it us, or do you, too, feel like the owners of Ethington Auto Sales have been sent to prison before they ever have faced a jury?

    Donnie Ethington and William Ledford, owners of the auto dealership in Shelbyville, saw their license to operate rescinded by the Kentucky Motor Vehicle Commission because of the ongoing criminal investigation into the way they have managed their dealership.

    Mr. Ethington and Mr. Ledford were able to keep open their doors past Sunday by filing an appeal with the Franklin County Circuit Court, their sole recourse at their option.

  • We are preparing for the annual state assessments in May – but it’s out with the old and in with the new.

    The new state system is called Unbridled Learning: College/Career-Readiness for All. It takes into account all areas of a school’s work and even replaces No Child Left Behind (NCLB) requirements because of a federal waiver. That means Shelby County Public Schools will have a single set of goals to meet.

    I am excited – and anxious – about the changes.

  • Are you as sick as we are about these games that are played in Frankfort?

    Are you sick of politics overpowering decision-making? Are you with us and think the name of our legislative branch should be changed to the “Generally Worthless Assembly?”

    Because that’s what we have had for the past two months: a pretty – and petty – worthless assembly of lawmakers who could not do their jobs because they were being wagged by the political dogs.