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Opinion

  • The concept being extended by longtime Shelby County native Joe Ruble to build an iconic statue of Squire Boone on the east end of Shelbyville is another significant and – we think – embraceable piece of entrepreneurship by a citizen who loves Shelby County and revels in its history.

  • We love the Kentucky State Fair for many reasons, but one is that we just love seeing our friends and neighbors getting ribbons and prizes for doing what they love most to do.

    This is a time when dedication to talents and hobbies brings attention from everyone, when great cooking, a cool drawing, a beautiful quart of honey, a composed heifer, a perfect bale of hay and, of course, a studly and elegant horse draw the eye of a state and perhaps a nation.

  • A  man and I were talking the other day about another lost teaching moment for young people.
    We reminisced about how boys and girls are missing out on one of those annual activities that taught us so much about the challenges of life, about how we could face them, and, well, about nature, in a roundabout way.
    In fact, of the fundamentals taught to our dubious and dumbfounded dispositions, I might suggest this endeavor had perhaps the greatest impact on our development this side of a hug or a switch, though hardly anywhere close to that personal.

  • Your outcry for better accountability by our elected officials and your decry of almost any decision of a fiscal nature have become our foundations of public debate.

    You, the public, often challenge those you elected to do a better job, to listen to the needs of the citizens and not to those of special interests, corporations or other political influencers.

  • Collins High School...an opportunity for success.

    As one drives up Discovery Boulevard, an impressive "green" school comes into view. Cross-country runners can be seen trotting over the sprawling rural campus. One also notices coaches and students from various teams sharing fields and making the best of a challenging situation. The band beats out cheerful tunes in the parking lot.

    If one enters the school, they quickly notice pictures on the wall proudly

    displaying last year’s Governor Scholar recipients. Three more will join them

  • Many of you may have noticed the recent media blitz sponsored by nearly 10,000 law enforcement agencies nationwide aimed at impaired driving known as “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over.”

    This campaign, which officially kicked off on Aug. 19, continues through this Labor Day.

    The statistics demonstrating the need for this type of campaign are not very difficult to locate.

    While data shows that alcohol-impaired-driving fatalities across the country have declined by almost 8 percent in the last year, the numbers are still extremely high.

  • As one drives onto the boulevard leading to the Collins High School campus, all seems well.
    A short while later, the observant person notices large quantities of grass clippings all over the road. Weeds and grass are growing in the cracks of the asphalt and concrete, which in the present state will do irreparable harm to both if not corrected quickly.
    The lack of maintenance will allow the weeds to punch holes in the side of the asphalt and therefore create another outlandish expense for the school. The flower beds all around the school are consumed with weeds.

  • There’s a high probability that you never met Clarence Miller, though you may well recognize the name. And, if so, his passing last week stole from you and from us an opportunity to know and embrace Mr. Miller’s significant accomplishment and his keen sense of community.
    We often measure a death by the legacy that remains, and with Clarence Miller that legacy is both large and long, his sense of his fellow man and his county both outstanding and exemplary.

  • Two recent news reports sadly have merged to bring home with a new and powerful impact an issue that for decades has been troubling not only for the residents of Shelby County but for many across the state and the nation: criminal activity among illegal immigrants.

  • There was a mysterious presence in the air over Shelby County last week.
    It hovered over neighborhoods, flew low from one end of the county to the other, and landed in the field on the back of a farm, separated from homes only by groves of mature trees.
    It seemed to hang in the air like one of Tiger Woods’ tee-shots used to do, and then sort of drift along the horizon like some oversized dragon fly.
    It drew people from their homes and toward those trees and fields. It lit up the phone lines and fired up Facebook.

  • The mission of our school district is reflected in our ultimate Big Goal – graduate by 2016 all students meeting college and career readiness benchmarks. I would like those in the community to be able to discuss the goals with students, friends, family and neighbors.

    But I also hope that understanding the goals helps you to gain insight into the purpose of our work in Shelby County Public Schools this school year.

  • Shelby County Fiscal Court is moving quickly this week to close the Who Da Thot It Bridge – commonly called Jail Hill Bridge – that historic span connecting downtown Shelbyville north from 5th Street. In fact, even as you read this, the bridge already may be closed.

    Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger cited a recent inspection of the bridge by the state as his basis for asking magistrates on Tuesday morning for an executive order to close the bridge immediately as a matter of public safety.

  • Another successful Shelbyville Horse Show has finished its run, and by all accounts its 22nd edition may have been the biggest and best ever.

    Certainly large crowds turned out during the four days, despite sweltering heat, and the number of horses entered grew significantly, bringing in vans from as far away as Texas to compete against the best.

  • There was a woman with whom I once worked who had a phenomenal phobia about bridges, which, living in Florida as we did, was something not easily managed.

    She had a Golden Rule about bridges: Don’t go unto them, and they can’t do unto you. She would drive to great lengths to avoid a span of any size greater than, say, a 2-lane culvert-crosser.

  • How many times has it been you? Awaken early, pile into the car and head down the road on a family vacation, excited, weary from a long preparation time, plotting a shortest-possible course across perhaps foreign territory to arrive at your destination.
    Your anticipation is racing through your veins, adrenalin pushing it like a chemical locomotive, and you keep your eye on the ever-larger dot on the map as you dash toward its fullness, following that beacon to a place of joy and wonder and happiness.

  • The problem with the redrawing of magisterial districts in Shelby County would seem to be one of simple geometry that anyone can appreciate:

    No matter how you slice it, you can’t create seven truly equal pieces of a pie.

    Yet, that’s the problem facing fiscal court as it goes through the suggestion/review process required every 10 years to ensure that each magistrate represents a nearly equal number of residents.

  • We were extremely pleased to see how significantly Shelby County’s graduation rates have surpassed those of other school districts in the state, based on the new formula adopted for federal No Child Left Behind program.

    We understand that statistics can be misconstrued and misleading, but clearly Shelby County High School was getting students through the receiving line on graduation day. We marveled, too, at the large percentage of African-American and female students who had earned diplomas. These were standard-setting percentages.

  • It was my pleasure and honor to work with Mr. and Mrs. J. Edward Moore as the chairman of the O. L. Moore Memorial Scholarship Committee for the last 19 years of its 25-year existence.  It was one of the most rewarding experiences in which I participated in my 43 years of educational work.

  • Law school’s loss is East Middle School’s gain. Because Myron Montgomery decided to become a teacher and not a corporate attorney, the Missiles now have a new assistant principal who said, “I knew this was something I wanted to do for a long time....This is an industry where everyone is invested in improvement of the product, and our product is a kid that we want to be successful.”

  • The Board of Directors of the American Saddlebred Horse Association would like to respond to the article (“Saddlebred group has a bumpy ride,” July 27), which pertains to current litigation pending between the ASHA and a small group who refer to themselves as “concerned members” of the ASHA. We are a volunteer group of passionate and dedicated horsemen and women elected by our members to provide leadership and governance.