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Opinion

  • State Sen. Paul Hornback got it right, and he deserves our applause.

    Whether or not you think Sen. Hornback’s telecommunications deregulation bill – dubbed the “AT&T bill” in the corridors of his state Senate – was a good thing or a bad thing is not the issue here.

    What Sen. Hornback (R-Shelbyville) did that so many don’t do is this: He listened.

    He withdrew his bill on Thursday, and his reason for so doing was prime goodness: He said there was a public outcry against the bill.

  • A few weeks ago, I explained to my 10-year-old son how brackets work. I showed him the elimination process, how the winners moved one way and the losers another. I think he was more intrigued by the maze of lines than what they actually represented.

    And so today I give you the NCAA Tournament, basketball’s version of a maze in which good teams get lost when their names fall on bad lines.

  • The city of Shelbyville’s determination to begin an aggressive crackdown on property owners who don’t follow the city’s ordinances is both strong in might and clear in hindsight.

    City leaders said last week that they plan again to pursue homeowners who aren’t making required repairs in sidewalks that abut their property and that they would foreclose on property owners who are arrears in their taxes.

  • The emergency management leadership in Shelby County is worried about us, and so are we.

    Those horrible storms that surged across Indiana and Kentucky last week – narrowly skirting Shelby County – scared the bluegrass out of us. They were not just overblown thunderstorms but powerful, twisting trains that crawled across the landscape.

    And those who died in some cases did so because they weren’t ready.

  • As a student at Northside, at Southside and at Shelbyville High School, I never thought about the funding behind the quality teachers I had, the nice desks and school environment, the playground equipment, the athletic facilities, and especially the textbooks.

    I fondly remember my textbooks – seeing what upperclassman had carried the book before it came to my hands and covering it with wallpaper sheets or plastic wrap from JJ Newberry 5 & 10.

  • Usually when I tell someone that I am a Democrat, I get a puzzled look and then they blurt out “WHY?!?,” as if they can’t believe anyone could be a Democrat. 

    What I always say is that first of all I am more of a Moderate or Independent but they don’t win elections, and I feel that the Democrats actually look out for the greater good more than the Republican Party does or claims to do.

    That statement probably angers some, so let me explain. 

  • We in Shelby County awoke Monday morning warmed by the pure, serene blanket of Currier & Ives-caliber snow.
    We roused to the joy that we could have a day away from school to frolic in the not-so-cold stuff, to embrace the beauty of winter without its treachery, to enjoy a postcard from a departing season.
    It was just sort of elegantly pastoral and winterfully wonderful, wasn’t it?
    Did you go walking in our winter wonderland?

  • A troubling scenario has unfolded during the past couple of weeks about a conflict between residents and their landlords that has opened a seeping wound on the generally lovely complexion of downtown Shelbyville.

    Several residents who rent apartments of some fashion from Greg Wood Properties were left for a period of time without utilities even though they say they had paid for those services in their rent payments to Mr. Wood’s company.

  • We’re happy to see another international company putting up its banner and moving employees into Shelby County.

    Brown Jordan Inc., the world’s No. 1 maker of high-end casual and outdoor furniture, will open its showroom and warehouse in Kingbrook Industrial Park in Simpsonville next week, relocating from storm-ravaged Haleyville, Ala., to be nearer Brown Jordan’s headquarters in Louisville.

  • Articles that have recently been published in your newspaper about the Pleasureville City Commission have been very one-sided (“Issue about clerk’s pay linked to chicken letter,” Feb. 17). Those same articles have appeared to be making a joke out of the serious problems that have occurred and continue to occur within Pleasureville city government.

  • In 2006, the Kentucky Legislature took a major step towards building Kentucky’s economy by overwhelmingly passing the Emerging Technology and Consumer Choice Act. Lawmakers recognized that outdated, monopoly-era regulations were hampering competition and stifling investment in advanced technologies, and took direct action to reduce them.

  • This was a scene worthy of every clichéyou’ve ever read. Every trite phrase to define tension, intensity and personal fortitude was pulsing through the atmosphere. Every syllable of coach-speak echoed silently from the corners.

    Two teams confronted one another over the scant space of a yard or two, coaches tensely watching nearby, fans crammed into the standing-room-only swelter of a small venue.

  • Paul Hornback is in his second full year of representing Shelby County in the state Senate, and he is starting to step into the sometimes squishy purchase of both political position and important decision.
    He also will begin to see that those processes will begin to erode his legislative honeymoon with his constituents, depending upon their perspectives.

  • Were you as amazed as we were to read the story of Thomas Samuel “T.S.” Baxter, the first African-American elected to Shelbyville City Council, where he served for almost two decades before being gerrymandered out of his seat because of his race?

    We discovered Mr. Baxter as a small photograph in Portrait of the Past, Shelby County Kentucky 1865-1980. In fact, the caption beneath his photograph was the only clue we had to the story of T.S. Baxter.

  • Steve Doyle seems to be very poorly educated on the art of tattooing ("On Valentine's Day, no love loss for tattooing," Feb. 15). I am going to try my best to inform him without offending him, a quality he would be well advised to inherit (oops, there I go already).

  • I have been interested for some time in Joe Ruble’s proposal to erect a statue in east end Shelbyville to counterbalance the beautiful horse statue in front of the fairgrounds (“Help us to honor Squire Boone,” Feb. 22). While I have some reservations about the need for such a status, I think Mr. Ruble has picked the wrong man.

    The fact that he is distantly related to Squire would seem to me to be a conflict of interest. But that is beside the point; if we’re going to have a statue, Mr. Ruble is entitled to make the case for his candidate.

  • As many as 3 million Americans may have type 1 diabetes, often referred to as juvenile diabetes. The rate of type 1 diabetes incidents among children under the age of 14 is estimated to increase by 3 percent annually worldwide.

    Those statistics hit home with Shelby County Public Schools students Bryan Stapleton and Jacob Lisby, who both have experienced two of the warning signs – extreme thirst and frequent urination.

    Jacob said he also remembers “sitting around and doing nothing; felt I couldn’t,”

  • History always has been one of those amorphous topics to most of us, defined by our relationships to events and eventualities more than encyclopedic endeavors.

    If you had no reason to have studied the dynasties in China, the crusades to the Middle East or the founding of our nation/state/county, then you probably didn’t, unless someone stuck a book in front of you and required your attention for a semester or so.

  • The owners of the former Wesley Apartments, on the corner of U.S. 50 and Freedom’s Way, now are asking to be annexed into the city of Shelbyville, and the city council has given that request its first approval.

    We’re not opposed to having the property annexed – in fact, we think it should be and positioned for new businesses – but why on earth would the city want to accept this excruciating eyesore as it now exists?

  • The new garden plots that the North Central Health Department and Shelby County Fiscal Court have laid out for free public use in Shelbyville are a bloomin’ good idea.

    We like the fact that some awkward space at the intersections of 11th Street, Kentucky Street and Equity Street, which could have been a magnet for new concrete, has been prepared for the ultimate in green endeavors.

    We can’t think of a better initiative to promote public health for the health department to embrace.