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Opinion

  • When last we left you, we had shared our heartwarming little story of the Paint mare my wife had adopted, which some of you said left you feeling as good as it did us.
    We’ve had smiles and tears and hugs and plenty of handholding through this process, but today, in homage to the great Paul Harvey, we must share “the rest of the story.”
    Page Two.

  • The tragic and traumatic shootings that occurred in Tucson, Ariz., on Saturday leave us  at once in a sad and frightening place.
    For any innocent person to be gunned down is a tragedy. For a respected judge and five bystanders to be left dead and a promising member of Congress critically wounded is a statement.
    And because of that statement, we fear this is a crime with another potential target, too:
    This is an inherent assault on the First Amendment.

  • With the dawning of the new year, so many wonderful deeds have come and gone without a sufficient round of applause.
    So many have given of their time to help others (including in moments of need and tragedy). So many have been willing to serve.
    Many have been praised publicly – including outgoing public servants Cody Armstrong, Betty Curtsinger and George Best – and there’s an upcoming appreciation dinner for retiring state Sen. Gary Tapp.

  • I want to let the community know what really went on with the closing of Diagnostic Imaging Shelbyville.
    First of all, I would like you to know that I was employed by Jewish Hospital Shelbyville full time from approximately August 1994 to November 2006 and am very proud of that.
    My last position there was in the Radiology Department as radiology clerk/dark room assistant. I took pride in my job and made sure that all avenues were taken to make sure that the patients were treated in a manner in which I would want to be treated.

  • Sampson missed

  • As we set forth on the second decade of the second millennium, Shelby County, nearly two decades into its second century, has a significant opportunity to carve important steps in the path to its future.
    These won’t be huge leaps that cover a lot of ground, but these will be important baby steps on a determined and ineffable course that must be developed if Shelby County is to be all it can by  2092 or 2052 or even 2012.

  • Though my return to Shelby County occurred more than two years ago, its final stride perhaps is taking place right now, my feet sinking so deep into the bluegrass culture and manure-laced soil that there can be no denying that my immersion is complete.
    Our family is acquiring a horse.
    If that doesn’t take a boy raised on the cow paths behind a herd of Holsteins and project him squarely into our county as it is today, then what else possibly could be required?

  • The perfect gift from Santa Claus for me this year would be a box full of names of students are taking advantage of every resource so they can be successful in school. Students who typically make headlines are those who excel on test scores or in class as well as extracurricular activities. Their hard work throughout their academic career pays off consistently and they deserve those accolades.

  • Good help for Pearsons

    We are sorry the Pearson Brothers lost their home (“Fire injures Shelbyville man, leaves his brother homeless,” Dec. 17) but thankful the two are still alive. We have known the Pearson family our whole lives and found them to be nice and helpful people to neighbors. Our community will continue to assist and rally around the two brothers.
    The tasks/ jobs performed by Shelbyville Fire and Police departments and the Shelby County Sheriff’s office were extraordinary and commendable.

  • Here we are, the 52nd week of the year, a lost week, as I see it. Nothing gets done, no one is around, and we are left with an unseemly and neck-snapping transformation from the Most Wonderful Week of the Year to what I consider The Most Awful.
    Don’t agree?  I present my case. Here is a countdown of 52 reasons why I hate the 52nd week of the year:
    52. Doesn’t it seem as if you’re the only person/company/group working while everyone else is off?

  • The grade-point averages have been calculated, and Shelby County has had a good year based on how we have graded against the agenda we established in January.
    There will be no long speeches at graduation and no entry into an Ivy League school, but the grades we posted for 2010 would solidly qualify us for a college education at almost any school of our choosing.
    Based on a 4.0 scale, we as citizens have earned a  3.34
    We think that deserves a round of applause, but the ovation should not be delivered while standing.

  • Jolly Old St. Nicholas, lend your ear this way. But don’t be afraid to tell everyone what we’re going to say.
    Christmas Eve is coming soon, now you Dear Old Man, we’ll whisper what you’ll bring to we. Please help us if you can.
    Our requests won’t add weight to your million-ton bag or create much drag on your supersonic sleigh. In fact, we think to do so would be sad.
    As for us our little heads aren’t very bright.
    But we’ll tell you please, dear Santa Claus, what we think is right.

  • There are so many firsts these days for Collins High School that perhaps we need to develop a time capsule and put inside it a long list to record them all.

    We make this suggestion in the wake of the historic – by several definitions – performance of cross-country runner Caterina Karas.

  • The little girl regarded the question from the corpulent man in a bright red suit. Her dark, almond eyes were caught somewhere between enamor and fear but dead-on serious. There was no smile, but no tears, either.

  • We understand that during election season issues that have no immediacy will be placed on back burners by legislative bodies, allowing them to remain just warm enough to be alive but not gurgling and bubbling loud enough necessarily to be noticed.

    Members of those bodies campaigning for re-election are sensitive to decisions that may attract controversy, and they don’t want to see these campaigns waylaid by a vote on an item that just as easily could be done in December as August.

  • We must in the sense of fairness today congratulate those who did the work, made the decision and, ultimately, took down the final barriers to open the Shelbyville Bypass.

    We have catcalled, cajoled and even cried a bit these past few years as the bypass construction moved a long at a pace that was both insensitive to local residents and insulting to taxpayers in general,

    But now the road is open, and all is right in the world.

  • We have praised Lee Bean, the minister at Dover Baptist Church, for his efforts to start a men’s homeless shelter in the county. He deserved that praise, and now he deserves a second helping.

    His Open Door of Hope has in one year found a way to move out of a cramped apartment in the downtown Shelbyville corridor into a full home with a yard that is located in an even more appropriate setting.

  • The report last week by the U.S Surgeon General about the even more damaging effects of smoking – that brief exposures to even second-hand smoke can cause immediate and significant problems for your body – should light a fire under discussions in Shelby County about creating a smoking policy for restaurants.

  • Normally a huge manufacturing company’s decision for changes both good and bad would escape the range of our focus.

    But the Ford Motor Company’s announcement Thursday of a huge investment in one of its plants in Louisville, an investment that will add hundreds of jobs to the market, can’t escape our gratitude.

  • Tuesday of this week marked the 69th anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Indeed, Dec. 7, 1941 has become, just as President Roosevelt proclaimed, “a date which will live in infamy.” Other dates and events are embedded into the fabric of our country as well: July 4, 1776. Nov. 22, 1963 (when JFK was assassinated). Jan. 28, 1986 (the day the Space Shuttle Challenger exploded). Sept. 11,2001.