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Opinion

  • I don’t have a dog in this fight, but now I can’t imagine that Mitt Romney has any more chance of carrying Shelby County on Election Day (either of them)  than Hooch does of of winning the Westminster Dog Show.

    That became cat-eyed clear when I read the other day for the first time the story of the Romney family’s dog and his ride atop the car on a family vacation.

    I realize many of you who doggedly follow the political pontifications already know all the leavings on this.

  • Shelby County Public Schools is facing a rather rare opportunity that has emerged at even a rarer time – a situation so unique that school officials should find it compulsory to use the situation to its best advantage.

    We speak of the five openings for principals – at Collins High School, East Middle and three elementary schools – that must be filled before the next school year, nearly half the principals employed by the district.

  • Is it us, or do you, too, feel like the owners of Ethington Auto Sales have been sent to prison before they ever have faced a jury?

    Donnie Ethington and William Ledford, owners of the auto dealership in Shelbyville, saw their license to operate rescinded by the Kentucky Motor Vehicle Commission because of the ongoing criminal investigation into the way they have managed their dealership.

    Mr. Ethington and Mr. Ledford were able to keep open their doors past Sunday by filing an appeal with the Franklin County Circuit Court, their sole recourse at their option.

  • We are preparing for the annual state assessments in May – but it’s out with the old and in with the new.

    The new state system is called Unbridled Learning: College/Career-Readiness for All. It takes into account all areas of a school’s work and even replaces No Child Left Behind (NCLB) requirements because of a federal waiver. That means Shelby County Public Schools will have a single set of goals to meet.

    I am excited – and anxious – about the changes.

  • Are you as sick as we are about these games that are played in Frankfort?

    Are you sick of politics overpowering decision-making? Are you with us and think the name of our legislative branch should be changed to the “Generally Worthless Assembly?”

    Because that’s what we have had for the past two months: a pretty – and petty – worthless assembly of lawmakers who could not do their jobs because they were being wagged by the political dogs.

  • A sympathy card is in the mail to Lisa Douglas.

    You may remember her, the wife of attorney Oliver Wendell Douglas, who was pulled against her will from her apartment on Park Avenue in New York City and moved to a farm in the middle of somewhere so her husband could pursue his true passion of farming.

    Lisa wasn’t happy about that decision, because the new digs were closer to henhouse than penthouse, if you get my drift. But she adapted.

  • My son walked into the kitchen the other day, dressed for an evening event, and asked me proudly, “Do you like how I have my hair organized?”

    Although he is gifted in language arts, he didn’t quite understand why I immediately laughed, thinking perhaps that his “organization” wasn’t all that great.

    Truth is, he has extremely soft, thick hair – think of something that you would use to brush clean a fine fabric or even your own hair – and it had grown beyond its “organizational” best.

  • Those employment figures at Martinrea Heavy Stamping are surely something to brag about. Adding 150 jobs to a hanging-by-a-thread workforce deserves applause from all of us.

    Shelby County Fiscal Court certainly offered its good wishes last week, and we join the magistrates in saying thank you to the company and to Ford Motor Company for its continuing and growing commitment to Shelby County.

  • We are breathing a lot easier knowing that Shelby County is considered the ninth-healthiest among our 120 counties. It’s nice to know that our standards for healthfulness and our pursuit of those standards are valued by outside observers.

    And we certainly share Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger’s goal of being No. 1 – what does Oldham County have that we don’t, except for more people? – and we encourage the aggressive pursuit of that lofty ranking.

  • This spring, my wife and I will be replacing the sidewalk abutting our home on Henry Clay Street in Shelbyville. We were among the first 150 residents in a 22-square-block area to receive notice from the Codes Enforcement Office that a 16-year dormant ordinance requiring homeowners to pay for sidewalk repairs was being resurrected and enforced.

    The letter directed us to start making arrangements within 30 days and complete the work within 60 days, or the city would make the repairs and file a lien against our home for the cost of the work, plus fees and penalties.

  • I was very interested to read the article The Sentinel-Newsthat started out talking about beef prices but ended as a discussion about organic livestock (“Shelby’s beef prices jumping,” March 23). My husband and I own Earth's Promise Farm. We are among the state's first certified organic farms, and we raise certified organic pastured poultry for meat and eggs, certified organic pastured pork and certified organic produce.

  • In the century plus that the University of Kentucky has played basketball, from the jump ball era through the 2-handed-set-shot epoch, across the short-pants-and-Chuck Taylor All-Stars motif and into the urban chic dunk-and-punk style of game, we have seen Wildcats of all sizes and shapes win NCAA championships.

    But I’m venturing a guess we have never seen a better group of them come together and cut down the nets in the season’s final game than we did on Monday night in New Orleans.

  • For more than a decade now, Jewish Hospital Shelbyville has been in the proactive health business for Shelby Countians.

    The hospital sponsors the Women’s Wellness Affair – the seventh edition was last week – and in June will have its annual Men’s Health Fair.

    Each event is designed to illuminate good health, offer encouragement for healthy practices and, in many cases, provide free medical screenings for individuals who otherwise wouldn’t get them.

  • The parents of students enrolled in Shelby County Public Schools today are astir about the decision Monday to extend the school year an extra day – to June 4 – to accommodate the day missed because of the several inches of snow on March 5.

    Depending upon how you follow the comments about the news that was posted Monday morning on www.SentinelNews.comand linked via the newspaper’s Facebook and Twitter accounts, the complaints fall into these general categories:

  • This week, our so-called one percent is made up not of an economic group but of those Kentuckians who are not incorrigibly immersed in college basketball.

    Are you thinking of anything other than Saturday’s big game in New Orleans? Can you wait? Breath bated? Bets down? Pride bursting? Have family gatherings, civic events and, oh, nuptials and funerals fallen off your Super Doppler?

    To heck with Florida vs. the United States Department of Health and Human Services. This is UK vs. UofL in the NCAA semifinals.

  • We were concerned to hear that an F1 tornado touched down in Shelby County on Friday, but we were terrified to learn later that residents in some pockets of the county didn’t hear storm sirens and weren’t warned of a dangerous weather system that was approaching.

    Shelby County Emergency Management Agency Director Paul Whitman said the sirens were sounded when a surprising siege of funnel clouds were spotted by radar moving east from Jefferson County around 2:30 p.m.

    One of those clouds had descended near Jeffersontown and done significant damage.

  • The turf malfunction that has rendered unusable the athletic field at sparkling new Collins High School sadly will cost this year’s senior class access to the facility.

    The senior football players and soccer players long ago lost their home edge and crowds, and now the track & field athletes have as well.

    Sadly, the great Caterina Karas, perhaps the most accomplished female athlete in Shelby County’s history, won’t be able to run a competitive lap on her home track.

  • Spring fever is supposed to arrive early in March, when you see the first robin, the bright yellow of an occasional daffodil, things green, abud and, well, warming.

    Spring fever is not supposed to be a full-blown summer sweat at the strike of the vernal equinox.

    It’s not as if there isn’t always plenty to talk about with basketball, politics, religion, economics, basketball, politics and, I don’t know, movies, but today we have to talk about the weather, because everyone is.

  • “Grading procedures do not reflect today’s teaching standards,” said Thomas R. Guskey from the University of Kentucky at a recent training session for principals in Shelby County. He could prove his point with a 1917 report card that belonged to his grandmother, which looked pretty much like a report card issued today.

    He and Lee Ann Jung, also from UK, shared their expertise in standards-based grading for Shelby County Public Schools because we have completed a study of their book, Grading Exceptional and Struggling Learners.

  • Robert Burry had a vision, and Bob Andriot saw it clearly, a vision that holds beautiful hope for downtown Shelbyville.

    Mr. Andriot, a lifelong downtown businessman and property owner, and Mr. Burry, an architect, builder and restoration dreamer, have joined forces with a concept to transform one of the downtown’s most undesirable but historic eyesores, the Blue Gables, from a seedy rental property into something of vibrancy and potential.