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Opinion

  • The passing of George Cottrell at such an early age will be felt in Shelby County not only by his large and loving family but also by the public in general.

    For Mr. Cottrell, who died last week after battling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS – Lou Gehrig’s Disease), not only was a motivating coach, an inspiring teacher and  a fount of incredible talent, but he was one of those true and fleeting elements for many of us: a role model.

  • Another Men’s Health Fair has passed at Jewish Hospital Shelbyville, and this year’s affair was better attended than its 11 predecessors.

    Hundreds of men flocked for hundreds of dollars of free medical screenings that ultimately  could save or extend their lives, and in so doing they were the beneficiaries of one of the great services provided to our community.

  • Most of the roughly 450 students who this week graduated from high schools in Shelby County – and in recent weeks peer institutions from around the world – likely perceive the passing of those diplomas as the metaphorical transformation from a 13-year trek through classrooms and textbooks to a lifetime of awesome and inspiring adventure.

  • The case against Enrique Olvera-Landaverde continues to perplex us. In fact, we don’t know if there is a case against Mr. Olvera-Landaverde. This all reads to us like lawyers run amok in a John Grisham novel.

    If Mr. Olvera-Landaverde’s name does not ring familiar, you may recall that this is the man arrested when county and state police, operating on a tip from Mr. Olvera-Landaverde’s wife, raided his home near Southville in 2010 and collected nearly 800 pounds of marijuana and $60,000 in cash.

  • The line drive whistled off the pink bat toward third base, where it scattered the dust when it landed untouched by a fielder. The batter took off toward first base, where a coach was encouraging a runner already there to move along toward second.

    The little hitter stopped at first, and as each successive hitter made contact and followed her, she kept shuttling around the bases, until, after she crossed home, she headed back to first base, where she was detoured by the coach and told she could sit down.

  • We know there can be bureaucratic answers to many questions that befuddle us about why things are the way they are, but that does not preclude our asking one question we suspect is on the minds of many this week:
    Why are students in school from now through June 4? Because they are required by state law to have 1062 hours – about 177 days – of “instruction.”

    But we question whether there is any real instruction being given on these last few days.

  • There are inspirational stories at the end of every school year, tales of students, young and old, who have persevered, diligently fought against odds and overcome adversity.

    In fact, to the dictum of having students “college and career ready” – which we embrace wholeheartedly – we add these examples of students who leave school “life ready.”

  • Every day is Cancer Awareness. Cancer is a 365-day, 24/7 kind of carnivore. It is not selecting on whom it will prey. My husband is a two-time survivor. When life is lived by simple pleasures, the enemy can attack. Life as you know it is forever changed. Attached is an open letter to Gary’s physician.

  • During the past couple of weeks, I have found myself standing before several of you talking about what we do and how we try to do it.
    And, as I tell any group to which I speak, I make my living by typing, not talking. That was a decision I made in college, when I realized that my flat Kentucky twang and wild blonde hair did not translate smoothly on television, thus ending my dream of being the next Cawood Ledford – with hair – which was after I realized pro sports were out, too.

  • With the Primary Election now all counted and complete, most of our eyes will be affixed on the names that will appear at the top of the ballot in November. We don’t doubt Barack Obama and Mitt Romney will have a spirited slugfest as they try to woo Kentucky’s voters and electoral votes.

    But our greater focus this fall will be on the undercard of their heavyweight bout, the faces in the races to see who will emerge from our counties and neighborhoods to lead decision-making in our community for the next two to four years.

  • One of the things we like most to do is to congratulate our young people on their success stories, and this is the time of year when that happens most frequently – with graduation, scholarships and the never-ending lists on Awards Night at our high schools.

    But on Friday night, in a stadium in Louisville, three Shelby Countians stepped forward and established themselves at the best at what they do against their peers from around the state.

  • In his address following the battle at Gettysburg, Kentucky native President Abraham Lincoln stated that we as Americans need “…to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced.”

  • The editorial (“Outlet mall plan will test us all,” May 9) in The Sentinel-News (Shelby County’s local paper) about the proposed outlet mall in Simpsonville (The Outlet Shoppes of Louisville) already seems to support this development as “progress” and implores: “We have to avoid the tragedy of lost opportunity.” How is progress and opportunity defined by building this outlet mall?

  • Kate Schaefer has won awards in art. Claire Schaefer has won awards in dance and beauty contests.

    They wish every student had the same opportunities, especially since Claire remembers only one time seeing children with special needs competing in a contest in which she participated.

    Their wish has come true because of their own efforts.

    These two sisters have worked out arrangements with the Shelby County Fair Board to have an art contest and a Miss Sensational Pageant for students identified with disabilities.

  • There remain many laps in the race for congress in House District 4, but no matter who wins at the polls on May 22, we get the distinct impression that Shelby Countians are going to lose.
    There are nine candidates – seven Republicans and two Democrats – vying for the seat held for four terms by Republican Geoff Davis, but even newer than those candidates is the presence of Shelby County in a congressional district that has its seat of power in the Northern Kentucky suburbs of Cincinnati.

  • Sophia Sanchez had one of those ideas that we love to praise.
    Ms. Sanchez, a student at Collins High School, decided that as a service project for her JROTC unit that she would set up boxes at each of the polling precincts on Primary Election Day so that voters could donate needed goods to the Shelby County Animal Shelter.

  • Recently a lawyer from the firm Neal & Davis wrote a few short paragraphs “About gun laws,” April 18) ranting about thanking the NRA for a Florida homicide being the "result" of a "stand your ground" law.

  • The chorus of public debate about the proposed outlet mall in Simpsonville is just getting warmed up for what promises to be a full-blown, 3-act opera, and we hope to avoid a tragic aria at the end.

    Anytime something large and new is projected to be positioned in an area that previously has been a pristine barrier of nature for residents and property owners, there almost always is an immediate cry that such a change would be a bad thing for those vested in an area.

  • Recently I heard the phrase “the new norm” being tossed around. I cannot specifically remember to what it was in reference, but I started thinking about what Shelby County Public Schools will look like when we meet our Big Goals: all fifth-graders going to middle school on grade level, all middle-schoolers going to high school on grade level and all students graduating college and career ready.

  • We see selfless acts frequently in Shelby County, but none has inspired us more profoundly than when we heard about the efforts of 12-year-old Jessica Carter.

    Maybe you saw the story about Jessica, a student at West Middle School. In 2009, after watching the movie The Blind Side and hearing the reaction of previously vagabond Michael Oher when he was presented with his very own bed, she was struck that there were other kids like Mr. Oher who didn’t have a place to sleep.