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Opinion

  • This spring, my wife and I will be replacing the sidewalk abutting our home on Henry Clay Street in Shelbyville. We were among the first 150 residents in a 22-square-block area to receive notice from the Codes Enforcement Office that a 16-year dormant ordinance requiring homeowners to pay for sidewalk repairs was being resurrected and enforced.

    The letter directed us to start making arrangements within 30 days and complete the work within 60 days, or the city would make the repairs and file a lien against our home for the cost of the work, plus fees and penalties.

  • I was very interested to read the article The Sentinel-Newsthat started out talking about beef prices but ended as a discussion about organic livestock (“Shelby’s beef prices jumping,” March 23). My husband and I own Earth's Promise Farm. We are among the state's first certified organic farms, and we raise certified organic pastured poultry for meat and eggs, certified organic pastured pork and certified organic produce.

  • In the century plus that the University of Kentucky has played basketball, from the jump ball era through the 2-handed-set-shot epoch, across the short-pants-and-Chuck Taylor All-Stars motif and into the urban chic dunk-and-punk style of game, we have seen Wildcats of all sizes and shapes win NCAA championships.

    But I’m venturing a guess we have never seen a better group of them come together and cut down the nets in the season’s final game than we did on Monday night in New Orleans.

  • For more than a decade now, Jewish Hospital Shelbyville has been in the proactive health business for Shelby Countians.

    The hospital sponsors the Women’s Wellness Affair – the seventh edition was last week – and in June will have its annual Men’s Health Fair.

    Each event is designed to illuminate good health, offer encouragement for healthy practices and, in many cases, provide free medical screenings for individuals who otherwise wouldn’t get them.

  • The parents of students enrolled in Shelby County Public Schools today are astir about the decision Monday to extend the school year an extra day – to June 4 – to accommodate the day missed because of the several inches of snow on March 5.

    Depending upon how you follow the comments about the news that was posted Monday morning on www.SentinelNews.comand linked via the newspaper’s Facebook and Twitter accounts, the complaints fall into these general categories:

  • This week, our so-called one percent is made up not of an economic group but of those Kentuckians who are not incorrigibly immersed in college basketball.

    Are you thinking of anything other than Saturday’s big game in New Orleans? Can you wait? Breath bated? Bets down? Pride bursting? Have family gatherings, civic events and, oh, nuptials and funerals fallen off your Super Doppler?

    To heck with Florida vs. the United States Department of Health and Human Services. This is UK vs. UofL in the NCAA semifinals.

  • We were concerned to hear that an F1 tornado touched down in Shelby County on Friday, but we were terrified to learn later that residents in some pockets of the county didn’t hear storm sirens and weren’t warned of a dangerous weather system that was approaching.

    Shelby County Emergency Management Agency Director Paul Whitman said the sirens were sounded when a surprising siege of funnel clouds were spotted by radar moving east from Jefferson County around 2:30 p.m.

    One of those clouds had descended near Jeffersontown and done significant damage.

  • The turf malfunction that has rendered unusable the athletic field at sparkling new Collins High School sadly will cost this year’s senior class access to the facility.

    The senior football players and soccer players long ago lost their home edge and crowds, and now the track & field athletes have as well.

    Sadly, the great Caterina Karas, perhaps the most accomplished female athlete in Shelby County’s history, won’t be able to run a competitive lap on her home track.

  • Spring fever is supposed to arrive early in March, when you see the first robin, the bright yellow of an occasional daffodil, things green, abud and, well, warming.

    Spring fever is not supposed to be a full-blown summer sweat at the strike of the vernal equinox.

    It’s not as if there isn’t always plenty to talk about with basketball, politics, religion, economics, basketball, politics and, I don’t know, movies, but today we have to talk about the weather, because everyone is.

  • “Grading procedures do not reflect today’s teaching standards,” said Thomas R. Guskey from the University of Kentucky at a recent training session for principals in Shelby County. He could prove his point with a 1917 report card that belonged to his grandmother, which looked pretty much like a report card issued today.

    He and Lee Ann Jung, also from UK, shared their expertise in standards-based grading for Shelby County Public Schools because we have completed a study of their book, Grading Exceptional and Struggling Learners.

  • Robert Burry had a vision, and Bob Andriot saw it clearly, a vision that holds beautiful hope for downtown Shelbyville.

    Mr. Andriot, a lifelong downtown businessman and property owner, and Mr. Burry, an architect, builder and restoration dreamer, have joined forces with a concept to transform one of the downtown’s most undesirable but historic eyesores, the Blue Gables, from a seedy rental property into something of vibrancy and potential.

  • State Sen. Paul Hornback got it right, and he deserves our applause.

    Whether or not you think Sen. Hornback’s telecommunications deregulation bill – dubbed the “AT&T bill” in the corridors of his state Senate – was a good thing or a bad thing is not the issue here.

    What Sen. Hornback (R-Shelbyville) did that so many don’t do is this: He listened.

    He withdrew his bill on Thursday, and his reason for so doing was prime goodness: He said there was a public outcry against the bill.

  • A few weeks ago, I explained to my 10-year-old son how brackets work. I showed him the elimination process, how the winners moved one way and the losers another. I think he was more intrigued by the maze of lines than what they actually represented.

    And so today I give you the NCAA Tournament, basketball’s version of a maze in which good teams get lost when their names fall on bad lines.

  • The city of Shelbyville’s determination to begin an aggressive crackdown on property owners who don’t follow the city’s ordinances is both strong in might and clear in hindsight.

    City leaders said last week that they plan again to pursue homeowners who aren’t making required repairs in sidewalks that abut their property and that they would foreclose on property owners who are arrears in their taxes.

  • The emergency management leadership in Shelby County is worried about us, and so are we.

    Those horrible storms that surged across Indiana and Kentucky last week – narrowly skirting Shelby County – scared the bluegrass out of us. They were not just overblown thunderstorms but powerful, twisting trains that crawled across the landscape.

    And those who died in some cases did so because they weren’t ready.

  • As a student at Northside, at Southside and at Shelbyville High School, I never thought about the funding behind the quality teachers I had, the nice desks and school environment, the playground equipment, the athletic facilities, and especially the textbooks.

    I fondly remember my textbooks – seeing what upperclassman had carried the book before it came to my hands and covering it with wallpaper sheets or plastic wrap from JJ Newberry 5 & 10.

  • Usually when I tell someone that I am a Democrat, I get a puzzled look and then they blurt out “WHY?!?,” as if they can’t believe anyone could be a Democrat. 

    What I always say is that first of all I am more of a Moderate or Independent but they don’t win elections, and I feel that the Democrats actually look out for the greater good more than the Republican Party does or claims to do.

    That statement probably angers some, so let me explain. 

  • We in Shelby County awoke Monday morning warmed by the pure, serene blanket of Currier & Ives-caliber snow.
    We roused to the joy that we could have a day away from school to frolic in the not-so-cold stuff, to embrace the beauty of winter without its treachery, to enjoy a postcard from a departing season.
    It was just sort of elegantly pastoral and winterfully wonderful, wasn’t it?
    Did you go walking in our winter wonderland?

  • A troubling scenario has unfolded during the past couple of weeks about a conflict between residents and their landlords that has opened a seeping wound on the generally lovely complexion of downtown Shelbyville.

    Several residents who rent apartments of some fashion from Greg Wood Properties were left for a period of time without utilities even though they say they had paid for those services in their rent payments to Mr. Wood’s company.

  • We’re happy to see another international company putting up its banner and moving employees into Shelby County.

    Brown Jordan Inc., the world’s No. 1 maker of high-end casual and outdoor furniture, will open its showroom and warehouse in Kingbrook Industrial Park in Simpsonville next week, relocating from storm-ravaged Haleyville, Ala., to be nearer Brown Jordan’s headquarters in Louisville.