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Opinion

  • We were pleased to read last week that the special taxing districts in Shelby County – about 18 of them – appear to be well ahead of the state’s curve for operating in the light of public view.

    That Shelby County Fiscal Court is diligent and timely in its collection and forwarding to state officials the budgets for these organizations is a truly significant and important caretaking of our precious tax dollars.

  • We have on more than one occasion focused on the lack of diversity in leadership of public education in Shelby County and have been frustrated by what we see as a homogenization that does disservice to the diversity of students in our 10 schools.

    It is not our intent to offer a backhanded compliment – because there is work to do on this issue – but we were pleased to see progress in the latest round of hiring of principals and assistants.

  • Last week in The Sentinel-News, there were many responses to the health-care debate, telling us all about the health-care reform and why it must be defeated. As one who knows health care intimately and at its most basic level, let me give you the reasons it must/should be implemented.

  • The probability that an outlet mall will be built at Simpsonville now seems to be virtually certain.

    There are formal plans to be specified and a lot of concrete to be poured, but the original proposal by the Horizon Group is well down the road to government approval.

    Add to that the stretch-run proposal by Trio Properties, and what we appear to be watching is strangely reminiscent of I’ll Have Another and Bodemeister rushing down the stretch, with the only question being which one will cross the finish line first.

  • Donald Cubert Sr. was not a classic politician but, rather, a civic-minded person who became involved in the electoral process.

    Mr. Cubert, who died on Saturday, was known for his kindness to people and his commitment to the city of Shelbyville, which he served for decades not only as a city council member and interim mayor but also as its delegate on countless boards, committees and ex officio projects.

  • Here’s what I heard a man saying on talk radio this morning. He was talking about the new high school basketball hall of fame that is being constructed in Elizabethtown. He was moaning – my word – about how Fairdale High School had no one in the first induction class.

    He spoke about how the school dominated boys basketball during the late 1980s and ‘90s – which it did – and then he said,  “We had two or three guys who went on to play Division I. We should have someone in there.”

  • In the eight awful days since God summoned angel Andy Griffith to the top of Mount Pilot and told him his baritone was needed among the heavenly hosts, I have read perhaps 10,000 words, watched about six hours of episodes, introduced a neophyte to What It Was Was Football and immersed in countless Internet comments about how this sole and soulful if sadly unacclaimed actor possibly could have risen to be an icon for two generations.

  • We are getting sick and tired of seeing our beautiful roads and highways used as trash depositories for the lazy and inconsiderate.
    Yes, we are talking to you, those of you who find it appropriate to roll down your windows – though on these days of triple-digit highs, we would think you wouldn’t – and give a heave-ho to the refuse of your lunch, dinner, breakfast and the beers you illegally consume while driving.
    Yes, you know who you are. What you do is detestable.

  • We have sung the praises of the late George Cottrell and his contributions to his family and community, but we can’t let his latest gift pass without using it as an encouragement to others.
    You likely read the story last week about how Mr. Cottrell’s family, beneficiary of a large-hearted community that purchased a handicapped-equipped van to carry Mr. Cottrell’s wheelchair during his final months of life, reached out.

  • Maybe this happens in your profession or in some aspect of your life: a moment when you want to stand up before the world and say how proud you are of what you do.

    That’s how I feel today – oddly not because of some magnanimous piece of journalism but because of an hour or two of pure fiction.

  • Thursday was perhaps the most important day this century for Americans. The Supreme Court’s affirmation of President Obama’s sweeping health-care reform will have far-reaching impacts on all our lives, possibly even helping to save some of them.

    But we believe history will tell us that the days – even the hours – following that momentous announcement will prove even more significant.

  • What wonderful news for little Addison Miles and her family.

    Their months of anxiety and fear have been answered by a match from an individual who may be able to provide a life-sustaining bone marrow transplant for Addison in her deadly battle against a form of leukemia.

    There was a very real fear that Addison would not see her first birthday because of the difficulty in finding a match for a transplant.

  • Every planting and harvest season, when farm equipment is being moved so frequently from one field to another, from one property to another, there goes out a request to motorists to beware of the machinery and to share the road with care.

    We think that’s a good idea, to understand the needs of the agricultural corners of our community, to show patience and consideration.

    We also think that consideration should go both ways.

  • The 150th celebration of the Shelby County Fair has concluded, and we want to present the Shelby County A&M Association with a blue ribbon for this year’s event.

    Fair Board President Ray Tucker and his army of volunteers and mercenaries did their dead-level best to make this show the biggest and best and most customer friendly as they possibly could. Their effort was evident from the midway, to the tractor-pull site to special events.

  • The award-winning youth librarian at the Shelby County Public Library, Sherry Bogard, was dismissed after an unfair board meeting held on June 19, 2012. At this board meeting, Mrs. Sherry, as she is called, was not permitted to state her case or make objections to the charges against her; all but one of the board voted to dismiss Mrs. Sherry based on speculation arising from a single viewpoint. The fact that there was not any kind of due process is among the more disturbing issues; however, there are others.

  • My name is Andrea Cottrell, the wife of the late George Cottrell, Jr.

    Our family would like to thank everyone for all their love and support throughout our entire journey with George’s ALS diagnosis.

    We were blessed and highly favored by our Lord and savior! George and I often talked about our blessings and how much we appreciated them all.

    So, one day, George says to me, “Dot, read this.”

    I did, and it was one of the most sincere letters I have ever read. This letter is addressed to everyone in the community. It reads:

  • You may recall that recently our family moved from the suburbs to a small farm, that we have been going through a sort of a sociological withdrawal, somewhat of a remake of Green Acresfor the new millennium, minus Oliver Douglas’s suits and Lisa’s gowns, Hank Kimball and the pig.

  • There is a sesne today that I shouldn’t be here. I should be in the suburbs of Denver, helping to lay to rest a man who in many ways made me whatever success I have been in this world, a man I call friend.
    Just a week ago, Tom Patterson lay quietly in an ICU in California, tubes and machines breathing for him. Breathing long had been Tom’s downfall, brought on by a 15-year battle with a lung-eating disease called scleroderma.

  • We found it curious last week when Shelby County Fiscal Court took meeting time and office time to develop, distribute and pass a resolution supporting the coal industry in Kentucky and decrying strict enforcement of regulations by the Environmental Protection Agency.

    We don’t have a problem supporting an industry that is at the core of the economy in parts of Kentucky and contributes heavily to state tax coffers.

    We just wonder why it’s a matter of business for the citizens of Shelby County, because coal is hardly a big entity here.

  • Sometime over the years the Shelby County Fair evolved into a pageant of pageants.

    What began in 1842 as a celebration of farm life and livestock has evolved in 2012 to be a celebration of our children on display like a lot of that livestock, and we venture there are more of the former than the latter entered at the fair.

    What for decades was a baby show and a beauty contest for young women now has expanded into a days-long, multi-age-group competition among girls and boys, which would beg the question about whether we have taken this too far.