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Opinion

  • Maybe this happens in your profession or in some aspect of your life: a moment when you want to stand up before the world and say how proud you are of what you do.

    That’s how I feel today – oddly not because of some magnanimous piece of journalism but because of an hour or two of pure fiction.

  • Thursday was perhaps the most important day this century for Americans. The Supreme Court’s affirmation of President Obama’s sweeping health-care reform will have far-reaching impacts on all our lives, possibly even helping to save some of them.

    But we believe history will tell us that the days – even the hours – following that momentous announcement will prove even more significant.

  • What wonderful news for little Addison Miles and her family.

    Their months of anxiety and fear have been answered by a match from an individual who may be able to provide a life-sustaining bone marrow transplant for Addison in her deadly battle against a form of leukemia.

    There was a very real fear that Addison would not see her first birthday because of the difficulty in finding a match for a transplant.

  • Every planting and harvest season, when farm equipment is being moved so frequently from one field to another, from one property to another, there goes out a request to motorists to beware of the machinery and to share the road with care.

    We think that’s a good idea, to understand the needs of the agricultural corners of our community, to show patience and consideration.

    We also think that consideration should go both ways.

  • The 150th celebration of the Shelby County Fair has concluded, and we want to present the Shelby County A&M Association with a blue ribbon for this year’s event.

    Fair Board President Ray Tucker and his army of volunteers and mercenaries did their dead-level best to make this show the biggest and best and most customer friendly as they possibly could. Their effort was evident from the midway, to the tractor-pull site to special events.

  • The award-winning youth librarian at the Shelby County Public Library, Sherry Bogard, was dismissed after an unfair board meeting held on June 19, 2012. At this board meeting, Mrs. Sherry, as she is called, was not permitted to state her case or make objections to the charges against her; all but one of the board voted to dismiss Mrs. Sherry based on speculation arising from a single viewpoint. The fact that there was not any kind of due process is among the more disturbing issues; however, there are others.

  • My name is Andrea Cottrell, the wife of the late George Cottrell, Jr.

    Our family would like to thank everyone for all their love and support throughout our entire journey with George’s ALS diagnosis.

    We were blessed and highly favored by our Lord and savior! George and I often talked about our blessings and how much we appreciated them all.

    So, one day, George says to me, “Dot, read this.”

    I did, and it was one of the most sincere letters I have ever read. This letter is addressed to everyone in the community. It reads:

  • You may recall that recently our family moved from the suburbs to a small farm, that we have been going through a sort of a sociological withdrawal, somewhat of a remake of Green Acresfor the new millennium, minus Oliver Douglas’s suits and Lisa’s gowns, Hank Kimball and the pig.

  • There is a sesne today that I shouldn’t be here. I should be in the suburbs of Denver, helping to lay to rest a man who in many ways made me whatever success I have been in this world, a man I call friend.
    Just a week ago, Tom Patterson lay quietly in an ICU in California, tubes and machines breathing for him. Breathing long had been Tom’s downfall, brought on by a 15-year battle with a lung-eating disease called scleroderma.

  • We found it curious last week when Shelby County Fiscal Court took meeting time and office time to develop, distribute and pass a resolution supporting the coal industry in Kentucky and decrying strict enforcement of regulations by the Environmental Protection Agency.

    We don’t have a problem supporting an industry that is at the core of the economy in parts of Kentucky and contributes heavily to state tax coffers.

    We just wonder why it’s a matter of business for the citizens of Shelby County, because coal is hardly a big entity here.

  • Sometime over the years the Shelby County Fair evolved into a pageant of pageants.

    What began in 1842 as a celebration of farm life and livestock has evolved in 2012 to be a celebration of our children on display like a lot of that livestock, and we venture there are more of the former than the latter entered at the fair.

    What for decades was a baby show and a beauty contest for young women now has expanded into a days-long, multi-age-group competition among girls and boys, which would beg the question about whether we have taken this too far.

  • This BIG Goal was introduced to staff and students three years ago, a lofty goal with high expectations, intense monitoring, and consistent engagement.

    The focus never wavered. The hard work got harder. The efforts were never-ending.

    “Not all of my students are on grade level but by golly way more than the majority are,” is what Pam Pickens from Painted Stone Elementary said on the last day of school, June 4. “Setting that bar so high made us aim high, and it worked.”

  • I was first paid for my writing when I was 13 years old. The Shelby Newsadvertised for "correspondents" to cover activities at the eight local junior high schools. Because the major activities were sports-related, a phone call and my immediate hiring became an introduction to the world of print journalism.

    It was the best call I ever made, not only because I would be paid the princely sum of 10 cents for every column inch of information I contributed, but it set me off on a career path that continues a half-century to this day.

  • They lounged beneath awnings that were erected under a shade tree in the front yard and at tables, chairs, benches and even a swing spaced along an L-shaped front porch. They squeezed into folding chairs at tables, found occasional seats along walls, surrounded card tables pushed together in the family room and even stood and sat in spots around the perimeter of the kitchen and on playground equipment in the back yard.

  • If this were Las Vegas, we would say all bets on an outlet mall being built near Simpsonville are now “double down.”

    That’s blackjack lingo, of course, for doubling your bets on the cards in front of you, and those who would want an outlet mall in Shelby County now have two cards to play toward reaching that goal.

  • The passing of George Cottrell at such an early age will be felt in Shelby County not only by his large and loving family but also by the public in general.

    For Mr. Cottrell, who died last week after battling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS – Lou Gehrig’s Disease), not only was a motivating coach, an inspiring teacher and  a fount of incredible talent, but he was one of those true and fleeting elements for many of us: a role model.

  • Another Men’s Health Fair has passed at Jewish Hospital Shelbyville, and this year’s affair was better attended than its 11 predecessors.

    Hundreds of men flocked for hundreds of dollars of free medical screenings that ultimately  could save or extend their lives, and in so doing they were the beneficiaries of one of the great services provided to our community.

  • Most of the roughly 450 students who this week graduated from high schools in Shelby County – and in recent weeks peer institutions from around the world – likely perceive the passing of those diplomas as the metaphorical transformation from a 13-year trek through classrooms and textbooks to a lifetime of awesome and inspiring adventure.

  • The case against Enrique Olvera-Landaverde continues to perplex us. In fact, we don’t know if there is a case against Mr. Olvera-Landaverde. This all reads to us like lawyers run amok in a John Grisham novel.

    If Mr. Olvera-Landaverde’s name does not ring familiar, you may recall that this is the man arrested when county and state police, operating on a tip from Mr. Olvera-Landaverde’s wife, raided his home near Southville in 2010 and collected nearly 800 pounds of marijuana and $60,000 in cash.

  • The line drive whistled off the pink bat toward third base, where it scattered the dust when it landed untouched by a fielder. The batter took off toward first base, where a coach was encouraging a runner already there to move along toward second.

    The little hitter stopped at first, and as each successive hitter made contact and followed her, she kept shuttling around the bases, until, after she crossed home, she headed back to first base, where she was detoured by the coach and told she could sit down.