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Opinion

  • If you went to Northside or Southside Elementary in the late 1950s, you were asked along with every other child “what do you want to be when you grow up?”

    The typical answers were (and note the gender of that era of thinking): fireman, policeman, teacher or a mama. Later in the 1960s, after John Glenn circled the globe, some children added being an astronaut.

  • In response to Linda Allewalt's letter (“Souder’s divisive tones,” Sept. 28), criticizing the writings of columnist Chuck Souder, like Ms. Allewalt, I generally don't respond after I've read a bunch of gibberish. I just toss the paper on the sofa, shake my head and go out and mow some grass. However, there was something about this particular letter that finally tipped the proverbial scales for me. It struck a chord in my soul so vividly that I knew I could no longer stand on the sidelines and be silent. For that, I thank Ms. Allewalt.

  • As many of you know, October is Fire Safety Month. It is a time that the fire service puts forth a little extra effort to get information out to the public to hopefully prevent a tragic loss of life or large loss of property.

    A fire can be a horrible event.  It is a phenomenon worthy of the fear and  respect it receives. October 8, 1871, is the date that spawned the need for  fire safety awareness.

  • There are three places every American should visit – and more than once if possible. Write them down, put them on that amorphous and trendy “bucket list,” commit them to memory and take them to the bank.

  • We are thankful this week that the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office continued to be vigilant about deadly accidents on Interstate 64 in eastern Shelby County.

    While we have had our eyes focused on the dangerous problem posed by the eastbound ramp at Exit 32, ensuring that the Shelbyville Bypass was completed and myriad other transportation issues, Sheriff Mike Armstrong and Detective Jason Rice were doing what we pay them to do: protecting our citizens.

  • Another person in need, another big dollop of support from the citizens of Shelby County: It seems we find these examples every month, when our neighbors step forward with generosity to help one of our own.

    The most recent example was the Save Savannah’s Sight event, coordinated by Shelby County Community Charities, to help raise the money needed for surgery to restore the vision of Savannah Sanders.

  • We were encouraged to see that David Williams, the Republican candidate for governor, came to Shelby County recently and had an early morning roundtable to discuss his platform and answer questions.

    Mr. Williams, the state Senate president, spent an hour talking with familiar faces, explaining his policies in detail and then answering a few harmless questions.

  • Shelby County Fiscal Court did the right thing in rejecting the zone change Midwest Metals had requested near Red Orchard Park.

    We believe that Magistrate Eddie Kingsolver addressed the appropriate issues in his motion to deny the request, citing the fundamental point that it was not in agreement with the county’s long-range plan and that there was no mitigating reason for fiscal court to change that plan.

  • I was jostled from a questionable sleep about 3 a.m. Tuesday by the sort of cruel cacophony that makes you spring from your bed to see what was that clatter.

    I first sprinted to the kids’ room, thinking one had called out. I found those visions of sugarplums must have been dancing, because they didn’t even twitch when I opened their doors.

    But when I was returning to my bedroom, I heard the noise again, clear and loud, blaring through a third-story window opened for the cool autumn air.

  • There was no close vote or public hemming and hawing in the most recent big decision made by the Triple S Planning Commission: Commissioners voted unanimously to deny the City of Shelbyville’s request to rezone 73 acres on the corner of Harrington Mill Road and Freedom’s Way from agriculture to light industrial.

  • We feel a little like a student in a statistics class because of the avalanche of data about the performance and progress of Shelby County’s Public School students that has covered our heads this past week.

    To be able to digest the reports from the state’s about-to-be-dead KCCT tests, the federal governments’ trying-to-be-dead No Child Left Behind and the new buzzword of development – college and career readiness – is overwhelming to just about anyone who doesn’t get paid to spend full days evaluating what the numbers say.

  • In The Sentinel-News(“Shouldn’t we all be outraged,” Sept. 28) the Tonya Brown case called into question whether the commonwealth is doing an adequate job protecting its citizens in pursuing justice on behalf of victims of crimes. This letter is to inform the citizens of the 53rd Judicial District what happened in the Tonya Brown case and why certain decisions were made.

  • In The Sentinel-News “Shouldn’t we all be outraged,” Sept. 28) the Tonya Brown case called into question whether the commonwealth is doing an adequate job protecting its citizens in pursuing justice on behalf of victims of crimes. This letter is to inform the citizens of the 53rd Judicial District what happened in the Tonya Brown case and why certain decisions were made.

  • You may be wondering what the heck has been going on with your newspaper these past few days.
    You may not care that Tonya Nicole Brown went into a restroom in Shelbyville more than three years ago and left behind her newborn baby, wrapped in plastic bags and dumped in a trashcan.
    You may not care that she is out of jail, barely paying for a crime to which she admitted in a court plea.
    But we, as a newspaper, had to tell you, and we hope you did pay attention and that deep down you really care.

  • Earlier this summer, a woman named Casey Anthony went on trial under the glaring lights of national TV, charged with murdering her 4-year-old daughter and covering up that crime.

    She became a national lightning rod, a source of vile hate, a person castigated in the streets even when a court found her not guilty of those charges, for which she could have faced the death penalty.

    A tragedy had occurred in the death of Caylee Anthony, to be sure, and it brought with it pure outrage among those who thought the guilty person was getting away with murder.

  • One of the first things Barack Obama mentioned when he was elected president – even when he was running – was that he wanted to see college football come up with a formula to select a national champion from among its largest schools.

    Forget health-care reform, defending our nation’s something in the Middle East and finding a way to keep people working and eating and buying luxury cars.

  • The generosity of Shelby Countians never ceases to amaze us, but we have to admit to a bit of slack-jawed awe at the amount of money being raised recently to help one another.

    We go back to July to grasp the power of RobFest, which took in more than $30,000 to help Robbie Phillips pay for needed stem cell treatment in Arizona.

  • We now understand that there is no hope for Who Da Thot It Bridge to remain as a thoroughfare for motorists. The state reneged on its announced plan to repair it – we suggest such announcements in the future be adorned with asterisks – and that Shelby County magistrates are not willing to underwrite the $1 million-plus those repairs would cost.

    But we don’t believe the bridge should be left as a crumbling eyesore just a few hundred feet from Shelbyville City Hall, either.

  • The federal government has imposed so many rules and regulations upon businesses that to administer their affairs requires too much overhead cost for them to reap a profit in what they produce or sell.

  • The Shelby County Historical Society officially opened its new World War II exhibit at its annual picnic on Sunday.

    President Sherry Jelsma thanked several members of the Society – Sharon Hackworth, Jim Cleveland, Nancy Hill and Col. Roger Green – for their contributions to the exhibit, which may be seen at two locations: the hometown front in the second floor of the Shelbyville Welcome Center and the military part in the VFW building next to the parking lot adjoining the center.