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Opinion

  • From A to Z, or perhaps Antiques to Zebrafish, you can find gifts in Shelby County for nearly everyone on your holiday shopping list. A wide variety of items that are sure to please and surprise a friend or relative are yours for the looking.

    And the looking is just part of the fun of shopping Shelby County businesses.

    Unique gifts can be found in businesses housed in intimate historical downtown buildings as well as large modern businesses that have sprung up throughout the county.

  • The footing on the course for repairing the multipurpose athletic field at Collins High School appears to be as unsure as it would be for an athlete or band member who might try to play on its ineffective and dangerous artificial surface.

    In fact, the plan for that repair seems to be changing so rapidly, we aren’t sure that the contractor, Whittenberg Construction, and Shelby County Public Schools are reading from the same page at the same time.

  • Veterans Day took on a new meaning for me a few years ago.

    As a child of the Vietnam Era, I admired and feared for those who took up arms for our country, but being a timid little country boy, I shamefully admit that I wasn’t real keen on participating.

    Perhaps admiration and guilt combine to form my odd interest in fiction and films about World War II, maybe they are  why I’ve read The Winds of War/War & Remembrance six times and watched the miniseries of the latter nearly that many times.

  • In October, LST 325 (Landing Ship Tanks) was docked at the Fourth Street wharf in Louisville.

    With an old Coast Guard buddy of mine, Don White, I got a chance to visit again the type of ship on which I served in World War II. In celebration of Veterans Day, it seems like a  good time to look back at those ships.

    LST 325 is the last of more than 1,000 LSTs constructed in World War II by the United States. It was purchased by Greece after the war and used as a cargo and spy ship.

  • When I think of “oozing, bothersome blemishes,” I get a bit nauseous. Is this “bothersome blemish” referring to the folks that hire undocumented workers? I doubt it. Rather, I believe that the reference is aimed at the workers themselves. The people who since the mid-1990s have come to Kentucky, harvested crops, worked with horses, helped keep prices down and worked for very low wages in dangerous conditions for long hours.

  • Shelby County residents are having to say good-bye to two of the good guys.

    Charlie Frazee, the county’s first head of the Emergency Management Agency, and Frank Chuppe, longtime city attorney for the City of Shelbyville, are moving on to the next phases of their lives.

    For Mr. Frazee, that happened on Halloween, and it was certainly a trick and no treat.

    Under his leadership Shelby County became a much safer place to live, with more planning, coordination among protective agencies and expansion of alert processes, systems and capabilities.

  • That was a double dose of good news last week for the so-called City Centre project that would bring a much-needed enhancement to downtown Shelbyville, a theater/conference center project to be built on the block surrounding the Shelby County Community Theatre.

    This is the inspired brainchild of educator Leon Mooneyhan, who has been working methodically with a small group of partners to pull together all the plans and funding needed for such a facility.

    And now he has received two early Christmas gifts.

  • We are concerned about projections we are hearing that most of you are planning to skip your appointment at your polling precinct on Tuesday.

    Statewide projections are that barely more than one in four registered voters will exercise that right and duty in choosing our next governor and other state leaders.

    We don’t really understand. We can’t grasp why any person 18 years and older would not register to vote and then do so at the appropriate times.

  • Here’s the first thing I recall from watching a World Series: In 1961, the Yankees were manhandling the Cincinnati Reds in five games, although I can’t recite details, not the heroes or the records or even the elation I must have felt when it was over.

    I just remember that my man Mickey Mantle didn’t play because he had an oozing sore on his hindquarters. They called it an abscess, which to a third-grader sounded like recess but otherwise meant nothing. I just knew that Mickey was hurting and that was a bummer, so to speak.

  • State Rep. Brad Montell (R-Shelbyville) last week took a new and hopeful stab at addressing a problem that we all recognize and rebuke: the hiring of illegal immigrants.

    His proposal – to require those most likely to hire undocumented workers to go through a specific process of ensuring the legal residency of those individuals – is not entirely original, but it at least keeps open the discussion of an idea that could help solve a problem that costs our country, state and county millions of tax dollars annually.

  • It makes sense that the horse industry would bring Shelby County serious recognition in the big-time international sports arena.

    On Sunday in Mexico, Hannah Sue Burnett, formerly of Finchville, staked a claim to a spot in the 2012 U.S. Olympics by winning a silver medal in eventing at the Pan American Games.

    Ms. Burnett, who was no worse than third aboard Harbour Pilot throughout the 3-day competition, also was the highest-ranking scorer on the gold-medal-winning U.S. team.

  • I absorbed the very little I know about trees from living beside them, beneath them and seeking their shade on a hot summer days, invading their fortress of darkness, where a boy could pretend he was hiding from the good guys or hunting the bad ones, and later enduring those cursed magnets that lured his errant golf balls to their deep, dark, deadly jungles.

  • If you went to Northside or Southside Elementary in the late 1950s, you were asked along with every other child “what do you want to be when you grow up?”

    The typical answers were (and note the gender of that era of thinking): fireman, policeman, teacher or a mama. Later in the 1960s, after John Glenn circled the globe, some children added being an astronaut.

  • In response to Linda Allewalt's letter (“Souder’s divisive tones,” Sept. 28), criticizing the writings of columnist Chuck Souder, like Ms. Allewalt, I generally don't respond after I've read a bunch of gibberish. I just toss the paper on the sofa, shake my head and go out and mow some grass. However, there was something about this particular letter that finally tipped the proverbial scales for me. It struck a chord in my soul so vividly that I knew I could no longer stand on the sidelines and be silent. For that, I thank Ms. Allewalt.

  • As many of you know, October is Fire Safety Month. It is a time that the fire service puts forth a little extra effort to get information out to the public to hopefully prevent a tragic loss of life or large loss of property.

    A fire can be a horrible event.  It is a phenomenon worthy of the fear and  respect it receives. October 8, 1871, is the date that spawned the need for  fire safety awareness.

  • There are three places every American should visit – and more than once if possible. Write them down, put them on that amorphous and trendy “bucket list,” commit them to memory and take them to the bank.

  • We are thankful this week that the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office continued to be vigilant about deadly accidents on Interstate 64 in eastern Shelby County.

    While we have had our eyes focused on the dangerous problem posed by the eastbound ramp at Exit 32, ensuring that the Shelbyville Bypass was completed and myriad other transportation issues, Sheriff Mike Armstrong and Detective Jason Rice were doing what we pay them to do: protecting our citizens.

  • Another person in need, another big dollop of support from the citizens of Shelby County: It seems we find these examples every month, when our neighbors step forward with generosity to help one of our own.

    The most recent example was the Save Savannah’s Sight event, coordinated by Shelby County Community Charities, to help raise the money needed for surgery to restore the vision of Savannah Sanders.

  • We were encouraged to see that David Williams, the Republican candidate for governor, came to Shelby County recently and had an early morning roundtable to discuss his platform and answer questions.

    Mr. Williams, the state Senate president, spent an hour talking with familiar faces, explaining his policies in detail and then answering a few harmless questions.

  • Shelby County Fiscal Court did the right thing in rejecting the zone change Midwest Metals had requested near Red Orchard Park.

    We believe that Magistrate Eddie Kingsolver addressed the appropriate issues in his motion to deny the request, citing the fundamental point that it was not in agreement with the county’s long-range plan and that there was no mitigating reason for fiscal court to change that plan.