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Opinion

  • Unless you are a devotee of the man himself, you probably had to giggle a bit as I did when I heard Newt Gingrich say recently that he wanted to be nominated for president and challenge Barack Obama to a series of 3-hour, Lincoln-Douglas-style debates on the issues facing our country.

    Unless I miss my guess: Honest Abe, the founding Republican, and Short Steve got off a good guffaw from the Great Peanut Gallery in the sky as well.

  • The boy climbed to his seat high in Rupp Arena on Saturday, his every sense keen to the sights and sounds of this famed arena, a Mecca to which he was pilgrimaging for the first time.

    He had passed its outer lobby while visiting the Hyatt Regency Hotel, reading the signs, noting the doorways, but his only peeks inside were from the narrow views of pixilated formations on a variety of television screens.

  • Gov. Steve Beshear has placed the state transportation cabinet in the fast lane to save lives in Shelby County, and we could not be more grateful.

    His endorsement Monday of plans to move ahead with modifications for the abbreviated and lethal acceleration lane from KY 55 onto Interstate 64 eastbound in Shelby County is not to be underestimated in making these 300 feet of asphalt safer for all who encounter it.

  • The redistricting plans for the state’s House and Senate leaders appear to be complete, and Shelby County has avoided the dubious and unsavory slicing that has affected so many of the counties around us.

    You can’t imagine how important it is that state Rep. Brad Montell (R-Shelbyville) and state Sen. Paul Hornback (R-Shelbyville) continue to represent all Shelby Countians and not just those on one side of an arbitrarily selected road.

  • There is a new bandwagon to support public education. Seven organizations representing the full spectrum of elementary and secondary education in Kentucky have banded together to urge Gov. Steve Beshear and the General Assembly to reverse four years of state funding reductions to key services that support teaching and learning in the state’s public schools.

    Thank goodness. Public school officials cannot make the demand alone. Our voices for help need to be heard loud and clear, and the more people screaming the message, the more likely we will be heard.

  • Random ravings while wondering why Richie Farmer had more laptops in one year than our entire newspaper staff has had this decade….

     

    Gatewood Galbraith today probably is entering the great governor’s race in the sky, bringing his folksy charm and unusual but not ill-formed ideas to that great debate.

    Whether you thought Galbraith a lion or a loon, you have to admit he brought some luminance to Kentucky’s political world, which typically has all the color of a corpse.

  • We continue to find unusual the City of Shelbyville’s approach to a parcel of land it apparently wants within its boundaries.

    We speak of the roughly 73 acres owned by Shelby County Magistrate Allen Ruble and his brother Tom on the southwest corner of Harrington Mill Road and Freedom’s Way, aka the Shelbyville Bypass.

  • What a heart-warming story it was for a young woman whose bloodlines seep deep into Shelby County’s fabric to wear the sash of Miss Kentucky across the stages of Las Vegas last week.

    We speak of the Miss America pageant on Saturday and the heritage of Ann-Blair Thornton, who grew from the gene pool of the Borders family in Shelby County.

    Most of you know Bill and Ann Borders, part of the former ownership of Smith-McKenney Drug Co. Perhaps you know their children or even some of their grandchildren. Ann-Blair Thornton of Bowling Green is one of them.

  • Dear President Obama:

    If you are serious about being re-elected, the door of opportunity has been kicked as wide open as the Montana sky.

    This isn’t about your ideas for handling our continuing economic morass, the ever-threatening swagger of Iran, the everlasting war on terror in Afghanistan and ever however much you think we should spend on the military going forward.

    Those are important, impervious issues, to be sure, but they’re not your real opportunity.

  • It was important to learn last week that a grand jury in Shelby County found that two Shelbyville police officers showed proper judgment and had no recourse in their deadly confrontation with a teenager last fall.

    We wish that the tragedy that spins around this horrible moment would have such a simple ending, but we don’t think it can.

    We cling to the hope that  the continuing debate also won’t have an equally tragic outcome.

  • Shelby County’s community hospital now has new ownership, and we’re glad at least that piece of the drama about the facility’s future is complete.

    We don’t know what impact OneKentucky Heath System ultimately will have in Shelby County – and we remain concerned about that – but at least the merger processes surrounding its future are signed and, for the time being, sealed.

  • It’s the time of year when we as individuals pause to organize our thoughts going forward, circle some dates on our calendar and prepare goals for where we want to be at the end of December. Some of us call these resolutions, but those tend to be tied to regiments that don’t really fit our lives and evaporate before the ground thaws.

  • Those of you who consider what happened on Saturday to be a dream game are, well, dreaming.
    You know who you are, wearing either red or blue and yelling like a banshee at that basketball cum football game you watched.
    Yes, Kentucky vs. Louisville – to let winners go first – was for decades a dream for fans of both schools, but except for the winning part, Saturday was something more akin to a nightmare for those who most wanted to see it played.
    To put it simply, sports fans, this was pure ugly.

  • And in the same country, two editors were keeping track over the newsroom by night.

    And, lo, an angel of the Lord came before them, and the glory of the Lord shown round about them.

    But they weren’t afraid, because they knew this was Fred, a neighbor in St. Peter’s Loving Arms Apartments.

    “I have glad tidings of great joy,” he said. “Which shall be unto all people.”

    They shook their heads.

  • When we first sat down to measure Shelby County’s success against the goals we had set for it last January, we were expecting to be disappointed. Had we really accomplished anything on our list other than getting a commitment from state highway officials to do an early remedy for the dangerous Exit 32, eastbound from KY 55 onto Interstate 64?

    That was stellar work, to be sure, but we also know that there could be difficulty designating the dollars required to accommodate a project we were told could begin next year. Does that tinge this tout?

  • We’re here again with our holiday verse,

    To bring you a cheer or maybe a curse.

    But we hope for a smile from ear to ear,

    Our goal is only a bit of holiday cheer.

    So with only  apologies to Clement Moore,

    Our Night Before In Shelby is your reading chore.

     

    ‘Twas the night before Christmas,

    And all across the field,

    Holes and folds were numerous,

  • Shelby Countians awoke this morning to perhaps the most wonderful new public facility in the more than 200 years of our history – the Shelby County Judicial Center.

    We don’t know how residents in the early 1900s reacted to the opening of the Shelby County Courthouse, and we set aside the oooos and aaaaaahs for new schools, because those tend to happen and bring new educational wonders every decade or two.

    But we believe the center on the corner of 4th and Main streets in Shelbyville is a building of which all residents should be proud.

  • Some have labeled us as Sentinel-News Scrooges for suggesting that the Celebration of Lights in Shelbyville is scheduled too early and infringes on Thanksgiving.

    We still believe that it is, but we will set that aside for now to recognize another dead-on Santa certainty:
    Lots of people in Shelby County love to celebrate the holidays.

  • In our annual pause to celebrate love and giving, we believe it is important that everyone remember the story that changed mankind.

    Luke 2

    1 In those days a decree went out from Emperor Augustus that all the world should be registered.

    2 This was the first registration and was taken while Quirinius was governor of Syria.

    3 All went to their own towns to be registered.

  • A letter writer supported Shelbyville Police Officer Suzanna Marcum (“About the shooting,” Letters to the editor, Nov. 30). I wish I would have written in earlier to show my support for Officer Frank Willoughby in the incident involving the shooting of teenager Trey F. Williams.