• We have had an alarming situation brought to our attention.

    Our state Cabinet for Health and Family Services recently turned down

    a request for aid from a young Shelby County woman who was brave enough to take on the sudden responsibility of caring for a sister she did not know she even had.

    The woman’s father, who had left her family when she was a baby, went on to father another child many years later, and that child in-turn lost both its parents.

  • There are just a few days left in the Kentucky State Fair, and already we are hearing about winners from Shelby County in a variety of categories.

    That’s always wonderful for us to see, and we look forward to the lists of winners so we can scan and see familiar names accomplishing great things.

    If on your visits to the state fair you’ve never taken time to tour the exhibits, we encourage you to do so. You will find some incredible and inspiring and creative, and you may just find that a friend from school or church has done some ribbon-winning work.

  • One of the travesties of what has become of the modern Olympic Games that was not caused by programmers at NBC is the inclusion of BMX bicycle racing as a full-fledged medal sport.

    You know BMX, that’s when oversized children and underaged adults catapult themselves over hill and dale while riding bicycles too small for your 11-year-old.

    At the risk of sounding my age, why is this an Olympic sport? How does it rank with running, jumping, swimming, diving and moving balls around with hands, feet, heads and sticks? Which god on Mount Olympus thought of this?

  • Because of incorrect information supplied to The Sentinel-News, articles on the front page and continuing inside on July 27 and Aug. 1 defined incorrectly the construction project to hide the air-conditioning unit outside the Shelby County Judicial Center. The barricade built around the unit is no fence.

  • What a glorious day was Monday, when construction crews from Louisville Asphalt began the 2-year project of re-engineering the dangerous ramp from KY 55 onto Interstate 64 at Exit 32 in Shelbyville.

    This is a moment we have awaited for more than three years, from our first suggestion that something must be done to extend the dangerously abbreviated acceleration lane, through two deadly accidents and several more near deadly ones, through changes in leadership and on to the inevitable budget fights about road plans.

  • An open letter to Chuck Souder (“Part 2: Are we going up or going down?” July 27): You should be ashamed of yourself. For you in the type of position you hold [with a church] to single out black and Hispanic people just shows what so many true Christians have a problem with, which is the use of the Bible as a way to promote thinly veiled racism and judgment. Shelbyville is a highly diverse community, and you are a community representative. You should uplift all races and walks of life.

  • “If we’re going to have education in Shelby County, we’re going to have to pay for it with Shelby County money.” That quote by a school board member came during a discussion of 2012/2013 finances and the continued cuts being experienced on the state and federal levels. The board members know a trend exists that revenue from outside sources decreases. They know tough decisions must be made in these tough economic times. They know our students deserve it.

  • There remains just one more week for candidates for our nonpartisan elections to file for office.

    On Tuesday we will have the slate for three districts of the Shelby County School Board and the city commissions in Simpsonville and Pleasureville.

    Is your name on one of those lists?
    We hope that some of you have emerged to offer your ideas and time to serve on these important legislative bodies. Our county is growing, the issues becoming ever more complex, and there always is a need for fresh voices in the conversations about how to handle them.

  • We love to compliment generosity. In a world too often littered with complaint and hate and costly fences around ugly air conditioners, it is, well, a breath of fresh air when someone takes a step for the greater good.

    With that in mind today we congratulate the giving spirit of Don and Greta Prather, who saw an opportunity to help the downtown Shelbyville city center project by purchasing and donating a ramshackle house on an adjacent property.

  • The article The Sentinel-News published from Raymond Broussard (“The trouble with Catholics’ cause,” My Word, July 11) reflects a serious misunderstanding of both the teaching of the Catholic Church and the impact of the Department of Health and Human Services’ mandate.

  • Twenty years ago, Aug. 7, 2012, we said a final goodbye to our mother, Mrs. Jesse L. Puckett. That is the name she preferred. She was never Ella Puckett. For the last 12 years of her life, she really didn’t know who she was. I had written a column in 1989 to mark Mother’s Day.. a column I thought was fitting even today for all those other families dealing with Alzheimer’s.

    She is remembered by most for being prissy, smelling like Tabu, always wearing high heels, enjoying the latest fashions from Lawson’s and hunting for bargains at A&P.

  • Dear Savannah:

    Wow, big day today. Little emotional around the house. Lots of lumps in throats, nervous smiles and anxious rushing around.

    You probably think the first day of kindergarten is all about you, but, well, it’s not. It’s all about everything.

    Because just like when your older brothers and sisters took this first small step on a seemingly endless walk along the path to education, it is overwhelming for those of us who love you and want that walk to be nothing but a dance through a rose garden.

  • A lot of you apparently want to vent about the 13-foot screen being built around the air-conditioning unit outside the Shelby County Judicial Center, and we don’t blame you.

  • The 23rd Shelbyville Horse Show steps off tonight, and there will be some pressure on its organizers. Because like any great opening act, the jubilee that proceeds the competition to rev us up for the show was powerful this year.

    The Shelby Development Corporation organizes this 3-day preliminary every year, but we can’t imagine any festival having been more successful than the one completed this past Saturday with a rousing evening on Main Street.

  • In 1812, on a couple of acres of northwestern Shelby County, members of Dover Baptist Church first assembled and discussed heavenly guidance in the prairies of what was then the nation’s western environs. Kentucky was only 20 years a state, and the congregation surely must have prayed for divine intervention in its growth and the safety of its settlers.

    This Sunday, that 200th birthday will be celebrated at Dover, and a lot of folks I know will be there – most notably, I predict, the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost. They are always there.

  • A guy buys weapons that Marines typically use. He stockpiles more ammo than the National Guard Armory. He applies his advanced intellect to build a lethal mousetrap in the apartment building where he lives.

    Then he dons armor and opens fire with as semi-automatic assault rifle, killing a dozen people and almost 58 more who are sitting calmly and happily watching the latest episode of Batman at a big-screen movie complex.

    That would seem more like a movie plot within a plot, wouldn’t it?

  • We were pleased to read last week that the special taxing districts in Shelby County – about 18 of them – appear to be well ahead of the state’s curve for operating in the light of public view.

    That Shelby County Fiscal Court is diligent and timely in its collection and forwarding to state officials the budgets for these organizations is a truly significant and important caretaking of our precious tax dollars.

  • We have on more than one occasion focused on the lack of diversity in leadership of public education in Shelby County and have been frustrated by what we see as a homogenization that does disservice to the diversity of students in our 10 schools.

    It is not our intent to offer a backhanded compliment – because there is work to do on this issue – but we were pleased to see progress in the latest round of hiring of principals and assistants.

  • Last week in The Sentinel-News, there were many responses to the health-care debate, telling us all about the health-care reform and why it must be defeated. As one who knows health care intimately and at its most basic level, let me give you the reasons it must/should be implemented.

  • The probability that an outlet mall will be built at Simpsonville now seems to be virtually certain.

    There are formal plans to be specified and a lot of concrete to be poured, but the original proposal by the Horizon Group is well down the road to government approval.

    Add to that the stretch-run proposal by Trio Properties, and what we appear to be watching is strangely reminiscent of I’ll Have Another and Bodemeister rushing down the stretch, with the only question being which one will cross the finish line first.