.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • We’d like to say thank you to the Shelbyville City Council and Mayor for ensuring some improvements will come to our fine county seat.

    By passing the 3 percent restaurant tax during Thursday’s meeting, the city not only ensured an estimated $700,000 in funding for quality of life and community enhancement projects, but they also guaranteed that our tourism commission will be getting the word out on everything we have to offer.

  • After $3.2 million and a year in operation, the Shelby County Solid Waste and Recycling Center still seems to have as many questions as answers.

    Recycling is actually down about 25 percent at the center – from 516 tons last year to 389 tons this year – but that’s largely due to the City of Shelbyville’s franchise agreement with Republic Services that went into effect in early January, as well.

  • Thank you for book signing

    Dear Family and Friends,

    It is with a humble and grateful heart that I owe you the grandest THANKY YOU! All of you made my book signing events a huge success. The love and support you have shown me brought tears to my eyes (literally). This has been an amazing journey thus far and I truly appreciate each and every one of you. Without you, this would not have been possible. I am beyond grateful. Again, I love and thank all of you from the bottom of my happy heart! Many blessings to you all.

  • With the turkey, cranberries and pumpkin pie all washed down and leftovers dwindling, we can fully turn our attention to the Christmas season.

    However, those of you shopping for gifts have likely already gotten underway with your holiday favorites of Gray Thursday, Black Friday, Small Business Saturday and, of course, Cyber Monday – if we are not careful, we’re going to run out of days.

    But let’s stop for a second and look back over those days of consumerism, and think about our one special day that is tucked there in the middle.

  • Last week Sam Eyle unceremoniously stepped down as the director of the Serenity Center, but we certainly think more should have been done.

    Mr. Eyle grew the Serenity Center from a somewhat unknown small counseling center at Shelby Christian Church to the area’s premier food bank, which still offers counseling.

    He oversaw the center’s move and revitalization of rundown building on Frankfort Road and then three years later to the former Emergency Management Building on 7th Street, where it really blossomed into the major player it is today.

  • It sounds like the Shelbyville City Council is ready to eat, much like the Simpsonville City Commission did not long ago.

    The council passed on first reading an ordinance that would create a 3 percent restaurant tax, but don’t assume it’s only at restaurants.

    The tax is an added line item on restaurant bills, so it doesn’t affect the prices. It also includes anything that isn’t prepackaged – so fountain drinks at gas stations, lunch counters, etc.

  • On a typical afternoon in 2013, I was sitting in my office as editor of The Sentinel-News when I was paged to the lobby, where I had “a visitor.” I arose and headed up front, expecting to be handed a photo of a large vegetable or prodigal grandchild or hear a scold from a would-be felon’s offspring.

    What I found was a face from my youth and a surge of warmth in my heart.

  • In 2011, federal agents launched a sting operation on an Amish farmer. Prof. Baylen J. Linnekin provides details of the raid:

    “Federal agents watched the home closely for a year, gathering evidence. Then, in a pre-dawn raid, armed members from three agencies swooped in.

  • Shame on Clear Creek Parks

    My son does not play for a soccer team anymore. However, he and his friends do enjoy going out to the park to play soccer games of their own on fields at the park that are empty at the time.

  • The Shelby County Cooperative Extension Office completed its third annual Good Neighbors Farm Tour on Saturday, treating those that attended to demonstrations and explanations at some of our best agricultural sites.

    On display were dairy and beef cattle, Icelandic and Rocky Mountain horses, orchards, sheep, alpacas, hens, maple syrup and blueberry productions and more corn and soybeans than you can imagine.

  • For a state that has continued to struggle to provide reliable high-speed Internet connectivity to its rural residents and better than national average speed to its metro residents, good news is on the horizon.

    Last month the state launched construction of Kentucky Wired, a high-speed Internet network that will bring lightning-fast broadband to almost every Kentuckian.

    The three-year project is starting in Eastern Kentucky and is scheduled to be finished in fall of 2018.

  • In a simple web search, I’ve found some startling statistics:

    (l) In 1960 about 5 percent of births in the United States were to unmarried mothers; in 2014 that percentage was 42 percent.

    (2) In 1960 no one was receiving food stamps; in 2014 about 45 million families receive food stamps.

    (3) In 1960 about 60 percent of adults in America were attending church regularly; in 2014 that percentage was 21 percent; from 2000 to 2010 for each 1,000 churches that started up in the United States, 4,000 closed.

  • Support our parks system

    We are blessed in our community to have such a wonderful park system.

    Shelbyville, Shelby County Parks and Recreation consists of many parks throughout our county – Clear Creek Park, Red Orchard Park, Shelby Trail Park and Finchville Park just to name a few. Over the year I have spent many, many hours in these parks, just like many I know.

  • We have long pegged Shelby County as a tight-knit community, but we must admit each fall we are amazed at the number of festivals celebrated in our communities and at the number of people that show for each one.

    In September and in to October area residents could spend every Saturday at a free event with their friends, family and neighbors and never have to leave the county.

    From Simpsonville to Bagdad and Finchville to Southville, there is something for everyone, everywhere.

  • As Shelby County Public Schools adapts and changes for the future, we are seeing many changes.

    The district is constantly revamping and updating items to better equip our students with the tools they will need to be successful in an ever-changing world.

    Next week the district will deliver new computers for freshman through seniors at Collins and Shelby County high schools, along with students at Cropper.

    This new initiative will help our students learn to use technology as it is further integrated into the curriculum through each of the courses.

  • The front page of Aug. 18 edition of The Louisville Courie-Journal had some disturbing news.

    Overdose deaths went up only slightly from last year, but the surge from the year before was 91 percent.

    Too much to ignore.

    The article went on to say we are going to make a typical Liberal response: Let’s throw $5 million at it and maybe it will go away.

  • More protection for high school students

    On Aug. 28, a neighbor and I were at Clear Creek Elementary School to present garden and butterfly information to several 4th grade science classes.

  • One year ago, as we all came back to work fresh off a three-day holiday weekend one of our community’s was in mourning.

    A shooting in Martinsville, on the heels of the neighborhood’s annual Labor Day events, left many in shock and awe that such an event would happen as the day’s festivities had just wound down.

    At that point it would have been easy for the residents to pack up their parade and get together. They could have used the shooting as a reason to give up on the long established Shelbyville neighborhood.

  • Last week we attended a meeting put together by the Shelby County Community Foundation and Metro United Way and we must say we were pleased and surprised.

    Pleased because assessing the needs of a community is not only a massive undertaking it is also a somewhat thankless job.

    As Leon Mooneyhan, CEO of the Ohio Valley Education Cooperative and member of both the SCCF and Shelbyville Metro United Way boards, put it, ““The expectation isn’t that this is all of the needs, but it’s a significant start.”

  • The United States Supreme Court decision, Obergefell v. Hodges, redefines marriage to include same-sex unions and gives privileged legal status to such unions. The opinion is legally and logically unsound, and its future impact is dangerous in several ways. A theological discussion is also necessary because homosexual “rights” have now been elevated over religious freedom.

    Legal Analysis.