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Opinion

  • All it took was bringing in a distillery that immediately left, but we believe our county officials are truly ready to get the ball rolling to make our county wet. And to that we say thank you.

    Too many businesses have come in and requested annexation into Shelbyville simply so they could sell packaged alcohol.

    We are not opposed to property owners having the ability to be annexed into the city, but something as simple and silly as the ability to offer sell packaged drinks doesn’t seem like a good enough reason to us.

  • Against a Fairness Ordinance

     

    In reference your Editorial, “Lets give fairness a fair shake,” [April 9, The Sentinel-News.

    First, I know of no one that would discriminate toward those who practice this lifestyle and, although my friends may find it inappropriate, or if Christian against scripture, they do not limit them in normal ways.

  • Fred Moffatt opened some eyes on Thursday.

    At least, we are sure some Shelbyville City Council members were somewhat shocked to hear what he had to say.

    A Baptist minister, Moffatt spoke to the council in favor of a Fairness Ordinance, and his message should ring loud and clear.

    But it continues to fall on deaf ears, as the council again declined to respond in any way to someone speaking on a Fairness Ordinance.

  • One of the best things about living in Kentucky and near Louisville is being known for the Kentucky Derby.

    No matter where you go – nationally or internationally – the first thing people bring up when they hear that you’re from Kentucky is horse racing. Well, maybe basketball and bourbon, too, but for now let’s stick with horses.

    That’s why Derby weekend is so much fun. Thousands descend on our area for a uniquely Kentucky weekend.

  • Saturday’s 140th running of the Kentucky Derby was far from the most exciting two minutes in sports.

    California Chrome navigated the mile-and-one-quarter in a ho-hum fashion, even being held up by his jockey, Victor Espinoza, early in the race.

    But California Chrome put on a stretch run that we won’t forget anytime soon.

    Although he didn’t lead wire-to-wire, California Chrome had a trip that could not have been easier. No one tried to squeeze, no one tried to cut him off or bump him.

  • Recently someone left a clipped out episode of Garry Trudeau’s Doonesbury cartoon in our mailbox.

    I don’t know why.

    I admit to looking at a few cartoons like Blondie, Dennis, Beatle Bailey hoping to find something amusing, and sometimes I do. I even occasionally look at Doonesbury to see if I can understand it. Never do. This episode is primarily a phone conversation between someone from the GOP and what I presume to be a PR firm.

    The GOP guy says: “We need to prove that raising the minimum wage would hurt the economy.”

  • Many dark nights ago, my friend Walt Carpenter tricked me into riding the Rock-O Planes with him at the Shelby County Fair.

    You may recall this ride, in its day the most adventurous on the midway and hidden down in the dark northeast corner, just around from the blare and glare of those infamous hoochie-coochie shows, and cattycornered to the Octopus.

  • We could not be happier that the Netherys, longtime Shelby County residents, have received state incentives and are planning to open the first distillery in Shelby County, at least the first legal distillery.

    The Shelby County Fiscal Court, Triple S Planning Commission and all of those working behind the scenes should be commended for identifying, responding to and solving an issue quickly and efficiently.

  • As pointed out before, our family does not meet the standards in terms of income or accumulated wealth to be considered wealthy. If we did we’d probably move our legal residence to Florida, Tennessee or some of the other state who have no state income tax or death taxes (the most obscene tax of all).

  • Even though I grew up in Tennessee, which I’m still to this day not very happy about, I was in Kentucky quite a bit visiting family.

    However, now that I’ve been here for more than a decade, I realize how many uniquely Kentucky events I’ve missed out on.

    I still haven’t been to Mammoth Caves or the Corvette Museum. I haven’t been to the Newport Aquarium, although my wife and son have.

  • People who have read The Sentinel-News through the years are familiar with names of the editors, reporters and photographers. However, there are lots of people behind the scenes who have helped bring you reports about our community: those who work in management, those who sell ads, those who handle composition, those who oversee subscriptions… I know, because I called The Sentinel-News “home” for 27 years.

  • Amid breaking news Monday that included suspects in an unusual murder case in Nelson County and Toyota pulling 1,500 jobs out of Northern Kentucky came the announcement that the Bluegrass Pipeline was ceasing work.

    We must say this came as a big surprise to us. Although Shelby County was on the extreme edge of the 180-mile route, we were interested in how the pipeline would take its Natural Gas Liquids from Pennsylvania through 180 miles of our commonwealth on its way to the Gulf.

    But now it appears that the project is dead, at least for the time being.

  • Hey Shelby County, it’s me Todd Martin, and it’s been a long time.

    I have not had a forum to tell you my thoughts since my time on the Sports Desk many years ago, but it’s nice to have this opportunity again. Although depending on who you ask, my thoughts may not run that deep.

    As many of you may know by now, I took over as Editor of The Sentinel-News a little more than one month ago, and it’s been interesting to say the least.

  • We’ve been back and forth on the curbside garbage issue for what seems like a decade. We’ve talked about it, you’ve talked about it and your elected officials have talked about it, but we continue to wait and nothing is getting done.

    Really, though, the whole thing is pretty simple: Can government provide a better service than what residents have now?

    Not just cheaper – although that’s a big, big part of it – but better for everyone.

  • Shelbyville/Shelby County Parks and Recreation’s Earth Day celebration is quickly becoming a highlight for the year.

    Even on Easter weekend, a large crowd turned out to investigate some of nature’s wonders and learn about conservation and recycling.

  • Thanks from Goodwill

     

    This past month, following a harsh winter that chilled donations by 7 percent statewide, Goodwill Industries of Kentucky launched a “March Gladness” campaign and the Shelbyville community really responded.

    We are pleased to report that donations increased by 9 percent during the month of March!

  • We finally thought it was safe. Furnaces were turned off, windows were opened and necks were slightly sunburned.

    We started to pack away our stocking caps and winter coats. Yes the long, cold, brutal winter was finally over.

    Or so we thought.

    We have long believed that you give credit where credit is due, whether you agree or not, and Old Man Winter deserves a little credit.

  • Live up to the Constitution

     

    The drug cartels are laughing at us as we keep drugs illegal to insure their profits stay high to fuel our enemies in our own hemisphere toward the destruction of our own country. Usually by our own police and greedy officials who are rapidly destroying our U.S. Constitution with compete impunity.

  • While we are certainly glad to hear that Corpus Christi has raised enough money and will remain open, we wonder why our local private schools have struggled to maintain a vibrant and strong population in recent years.

    Our churches never seem to struggle for members or volunteers, and our community has always had a strong attachment to its faith.

    But it seems as though many students in our county are sent west to Louisville parochial schools, but why?

    What would make a parent travel 30 miles or more for a high school education?

  • Last week the Simpsonville City Commission did something that very few governments consider – they chose to lower taxes.

    The 10.2 percent decrease in property taxes will be a welcome reprieve for residents, but we really commend the commissioners for their progressive outlook.

    Recognizing the commercial growth that is coming their way, the commission realized the windfall in taxes they were about to receive. And instead of instantly looking to see where that money would best be spent they took a minute to see how it could best be used.