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Opinion

  • I don’t know how the following is connected to conservation, but bear with me.

    In A chapter in Klanthhammer’s book “Things that Matter,” there is a passage about collective guilt – which is never far from my mind – that triggered memories of “separate but equal” laws.

  • Each year we get more and more excited by the opportunity placed in front of us to be a part of the system that appoints our local, statewide and national leaders.

    Then each year we get more and more disappointed by the apathetic approach communities across the country take in electing leaders.

    While our Primary Election on Tuesday was a small one, we fail to understand why all registered Democrats and Republicans are not out voting.

    But to those of you that voted, which was expected to be about 20 percent of registered voters, we say kudos!

  • As we cast our votes and watched voters fill voting precincts – well, at least the few that turned out Tuesday – we couldn’t help but notice how many locations were placed in schools.

    According to Kentucky Revised Statute, school cannot be in session if a school is used as polling precinct.

    We understand that schools cannot have voters wandering the halls and common areas while in session. The safety issues for students would be a logistical nightmare.

  • Based on the number of phone calls we have received, we’re not the only ones upset that Shelby County Public Schools did not seem to do more to punish Garnetta Stivers, the bus driver that allowed two students to walk home the morning of May 5.

    Several parents called our offices asking why more wasn’t done and how this happened.

    Our simple answer – We don’t know.

  • Eighty-seven percent of teens recently reported on a Gallup Youth Survey that their lives have an overall purpose, and a powerful impulse to serve other people and society as a whole pervades many of the comments of those interviewed.

  • Bible disputes need for Fairness Ordinance

     

    I would like to reply to an article in last week’s edition by Rev. Fred Moffatt. Let me try to address each point individually.

  • Because I label myself a conservative you probably automatically assume I’m a card-carrying member of the NRA.

    Wrong. Don’t own a firearm. Not particularly fond of the taste of wild game and Dad forcefully once made the point I should never kill anything I wasn’t going to eat unless it was trying to eat me. There is nothing in our home worth killing someone to prevent its theft—except us. That’s where we draw the line.

  • All it took was bringing in a distillery that immediately left, but we believe our county officials are truly ready to get the ball rolling to make our county wet. And to that we say thank you.

    Too many businesses have come in and requested annexation into Shelbyville simply so they could sell packaged alcohol.

    We are not opposed to property owners having the ability to be annexed into the city, but something as simple and silly as the ability to offer sell packaged drinks doesn’t seem like a good enough reason to us.

  • Against a Fairness Ordinance

     

    In reference your Editorial, “Lets give fairness a fair shake,” [April 9, The Sentinel-News.

    First, I know of no one that would discriminate toward those who practice this lifestyle and, although my friends may find it inappropriate, or if Christian against scripture, they do not limit them in normal ways.

  • Fred Moffatt opened some eyes on Thursday.

    At least, we are sure some Shelbyville City Council members were somewhat shocked to hear what he had to say.

    A Baptist minister, Moffatt spoke to the council in favor of a Fairness Ordinance, and his message should ring loud and clear.

    But it continues to fall on deaf ears, as the council again declined to respond in any way to someone speaking on a Fairness Ordinance.

  • One of the best things about living in Kentucky and near Louisville is being known for the Kentucky Derby.

    No matter where you go – nationally or internationally – the first thing people bring up when they hear that you’re from Kentucky is horse racing. Well, maybe basketball and bourbon, too, but for now let’s stick with horses.

    That’s why Derby weekend is so much fun. Thousands descend on our area for a uniquely Kentucky weekend.

  • Saturday’s 140th running of the Kentucky Derby was far from the most exciting two minutes in sports.

    California Chrome navigated the mile-and-one-quarter in a ho-hum fashion, even being held up by his jockey, Victor Espinoza, early in the race.

    But California Chrome put on a stretch run that we won’t forget anytime soon.

    Although he didn’t lead wire-to-wire, California Chrome had a trip that could not have been easier. No one tried to squeeze, no one tried to cut him off or bump him.

  • Recently someone left a clipped out episode of Garry Trudeau’s Doonesbury cartoon in our mailbox.

    I don’t know why.

    I admit to looking at a few cartoons like Blondie, Dennis, Beatle Bailey hoping to find something amusing, and sometimes I do. I even occasionally look at Doonesbury to see if I can understand it. Never do. This episode is primarily a phone conversation between someone from the GOP and what I presume to be a PR firm.

    The GOP guy says: “We need to prove that raising the minimum wage would hurt the economy.”

  • Many dark nights ago, my friend Walt Carpenter tricked me into riding the Rock-O Planes with him at the Shelby County Fair.

    You may recall this ride, in its day the most adventurous on the midway and hidden down in the dark northeast corner, just around from the blare and glare of those infamous hoochie-coochie shows, and cattycornered to the Octopus.

  • We could not be happier that the Netherys, longtime Shelby County residents, have received state incentives and are planning to open the first distillery in Shelby County, at least the first legal distillery.

    The Shelby County Fiscal Court, Triple S Planning Commission and all of those working behind the scenes should be commended for identifying, responding to and solving an issue quickly and efficiently.

  • As pointed out before, our family does not meet the standards in terms of income or accumulated wealth to be considered wealthy. If we did we’d probably move our legal residence to Florida, Tennessee or some of the other state who have no state income tax or death taxes (the most obscene tax of all).

  • Even though I grew up in Tennessee, which I’m still to this day not very happy about, I was in Kentucky quite a bit visiting family.

    However, now that I’ve been here for more than a decade, I realize how many uniquely Kentucky events I’ve missed out on.

    I still haven’t been to Mammoth Caves or the Corvette Museum. I haven’t been to the Newport Aquarium, although my wife and son have.

  • People who have read The Sentinel-News through the years are familiar with names of the editors, reporters and photographers. However, there are lots of people behind the scenes who have helped bring you reports about our community: those who work in management, those who sell ads, those who handle composition, those who oversee subscriptions… I know, because I called The Sentinel-News “home” for 27 years.

  • Amid breaking news Monday that included suspects in an unusual murder case in Nelson County and Toyota pulling 1,500 jobs out of Northern Kentucky came the announcement that the Bluegrass Pipeline was ceasing work.

    We must say this came as a big surprise to us. Although Shelby County was on the extreme edge of the 180-mile route, we were interested in how the pipeline would take its Natural Gas Liquids from Pennsylvania through 180 miles of our commonwealth on its way to the Gulf.

    But now it appears that the project is dead, at least for the time being.

  • Hey Shelby County, it’s me Todd Martin, and it’s been a long time.

    I have not had a forum to tell you my thoughts since my time on the Sports Desk many years ago, but it’s nice to have this opportunity again. Although depending on who you ask, my thoughts may not run that deep.

    As many of you may know by now, I took over as Editor of The Sentinel-News a little more than one month ago, and it’s been interesting to say the least.