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Opinion

  • I write these comments with all due respect to Sentinel-News columnist Chuck Souder. As a person of faith, I take exception to his position on faith and politics as espoused in this paper during the past six weeks. While Souder’s arguments are grounded in an understanding of God and Scripture, his is not the only valid understanding of God’s authority, creation and the way faith informs our lives and actions.

  • The foreign policy debate Oct. 22 between President Barack Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney was designed to help voters better understand each man’s vision for America’s role abroad. While I have publicly taken issue with both candidates on aspects of their foreign policies, there is no question that Governor Romney remains the right choice for Americans on Nov. 6.

  • In his My Word article Neihof (“Believe in students; believe in schools,” Oct. 17), Shelby County Public Schools Superintendent James Neihof describes what many state and county school officials are feeling: excited and jittery about the soon-to-be-released Kentucky public school testing results.

  • On Nov. 6, voters will head to the polls to cast their ballots for president, Congress, state House and Senate and some local offices. But Kentuckians will also have an opportunity to cast their votes on the following proposal:

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    When you have a special celebration, don’t you like to do something unique and make some personal history? There’s nothing like putting a red-lettered date in neon and setting a bar that you may not reach again, is there?

  • On Nov. 6, among the many important decisions voters will be asked to make is one that they should not make: to pass an amendment to the state constitution that establishes hunting and fishing as legacy activities in the state.

    That is shorthand language for the Personal Right to Hunt and Fish Amendment, which was placed on the ballot by a quick and somewhat quietly authored House Bill 1 that passed the legislature earlier this year and became part of the election process without so much as a peep from the legislature.

  • The election process would not be the same in Shelby County without the commitment of the leadership of the Shelby County Organized for Preservation and Enhancement – or SCOPE – and that organization’s commitment to this process.

    Once again this year, SCOPE organized and sponsored with The Sentinel-News the annual Candidate Forum. This has been happening every two years since 1988, and it is an established part of the election calendar.

  • With recent columns and letters to the editor in The Sentinel-News regarding Shelby County Public Schools, I wanted to provide my perspective having not been directly involved with SCPS for the past eight years after serving as superintendent for 16 years from 1988 until 2004.

  • I did not speak to the issue before the Triple S Planning Commission on Oct. 16 for a number of reasons: I hadn’t prepared anything, I wasn’t sure what the format would be, and I wanted to hear the presentation. However, in listening to the presenters for the zoning change request by Trio Development for its outlet mall project in Simpsonville, it occurred to me that we were taking a lot on faith and that some of the premises for this change were illusory.

  • Distinguished, Proficient or Needing Improvement – these are the categories by which Kentucky schools will be labeled in just a couple of weeks. Schools above the 90th percentile will be Distinguished. Those falling between the 70th and the 89th percentile will be Proficient. Those below the 70th will be classified as Needing Improvement.

  • Did Susan King of Mount Eden murder her former boyfriend Kyle “Deanie” Breeden of Shelbyville in 1998?

    That question, which for years haunted investigators and Mr. Breeden’s family, was thought to be at rest in 2008, when Ms. King was sent to prison.

    But now we have our own new set of questions about this case, including not only how the investigation has been handled but also who has a responsibility to ensure that Ms. King in fact did commit this crime.

  • Let me tell you something about the newest critter on our farm.

    No, this isn’t the magnificent, golden-tailed hawk that comes to sit on the black wooden fences separating two of our paddocks, more or less watching the horses eat their fill.

    This isn’t about the smudge-sized black field mice I saw scurrying under the leaves of the decaying melon patch as I was turning over the garden for fall – one of whom, I must confess, met an untimely interface when he was unearthed by the blades of my tiller, God rest his little vermin soul.

  • Herbert T. Riddle from Shelbyville was known as “Herb,” and I want to share his story, which is a story of how fate extended his life. He is 85 years old, but for a twist of change, he might not have reached that age.

    Mr. Riddle joined the Navy and was stationed at Barbara Point Naval Base in Hawaii. He was a tail gunner in a naval fighter plane that was to fly over the oceans and beaches around the islands of Hawaii.

  • We have a suggestion for Carl Henry, the new czar of parking in Shelby County.

    Mr. Henry, whose title actually is the county’s road supervisor, was given by Shelby County Fiscal Court the right to set parking regulations on all streets and roads under the county’s jurisdiction.

  • We were pleased to learn recently that the number of registered voters in Shelby County has increased since we last elected a president.

    That’s always encouraging, and because as our populace grows, we need those of age to do their constitutional – and moral – duty by becoming involved in the electorate process.

    The number of adults in Shelby County who have filed their paperwork to vote in this election is nearly 28,000, which is a strong percentage of those who are eligible.

    That’s the good news, but it also is not enough.

  • Perhaps the scariest time of my life came during a few weeks when I didn’t know how scared I should be.

    I was a third-grader, and at a time when most boys my age were concerned with being liked by classmates, having to take a regular bath and making the starting lineup, what I didn’t quite grasp was that the security of my world was teetering on the brink of total annihilation.

  • I keep saying to myself, I don’t understand! I really don’t. I am a dairy farmer’s wife in Shelby County, and we produce a high quality, wholesome product that sells in the stores today for $2.49 a gallon. In 1997 this same gallon of milk sold for an average price of $2.36 in Louisville, according to a 2000 summary by the Federal Milk Market Administrator.

    Dairy farmers have no say in those prices either at the store or the farm. We take the price given to us for our milk. The people who set those prices must think inflation doesn’t affect us.

  • We are if nothing else consistent in our efforts to provide encouragement and guidance for the people who build and manage the roads in our county, and we’re not planning to stop.

    And we feel that when the state Transportation Cabinet isn’t asking, that’s when engineers and officials are in the greatest need of our advice. So here’s today’s suggestion: Forget about placing more traffic signals on the Shelbyville Bypass.

  • Two more Shelby Countians are being considered among the very best at what they do in the state, and we like that.

    Sloane Barnett and Jennifer Cox are two of the 24 men and women statewide being considered for the honor of the state’s Teacher of the Year and moving on to national competition.

    Ms. Barnett, who teaches at Simpsonville Elementary, will vie with seven others for the top honor among elementary teachers. Ms. Cox, who teachers language arts at East Middle School, faces the same field among middle school instructors.

  • Leon Mooneyhan has taken on the role of the “music man” in Shelby County, trumpeting his vision for a downtown performance and convention center and scoring his own little symphony out of the sometimes discordant notes he hears.

    When I first chatted with Mooneyhan about his concept of a “City Center” for Shelbyville, about three years ago on a Saturday morning in the historic home of a mutual friend, it was – mixing my metaphors here – as if he were preaching a sermon while I was right behind him, wearing a robe and singing bass.