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Opinion

  • NOTE: Chris Hauck, a former resident of Shelby County, was one of the participants in the memorial jam concert on Saturday to honor late former music teachers Ernie Threlkeld, Susie Saunders and Mel Owen. He wrote this on the Facebook after Threlkeld’s passing last fall. Hauck shared it for publication.

     

  • In response to my article titled (“Is public education at a crossroad?” My Word, April 10), Rev. Jerry Stephenson suggested that I had “left out some important points as it relates to charter schools and the value they could bring to Kentucky” (“In support charter schools,” My Word, April 17).

  • NBA player Jason Collins made headlines and history last week when he became the first active male player from one of the big four team sports to openly announce he was gay. Of all the adjectives used to describe the announcement,  “courageous’ seems to be the most oft-repeated. I disagree for two reasons.

  • I suggest each of you save money, save your valuable time and save birds – even if not all of you would like to do. I hope to suggest to you as to how this can be accomplished in such a way that also hopefully will make you proud.

  • Both stories appeared in the same position on the front page of the daily newspaper. The headline sizes were about the same, the impact of the stories nearly identical.

    So it takes no degree in journalism to determine that editors believed each story to be almost equal in “weight” with the other. After all, any story at the top of a front page of an American newspaper is deemed to be important simply by geography.

    Yet these two stories were hardly identical, hardly equal and hardly of the same importance.

  • The somewhat scary but mostly frustrating situation that evolved on Monday at Collins High School – when the school received a “security breach” that ultimately earned the students an extra day before end-of-school tests and an early ride home – brought to light an issue that we have feared could be key as the school became settled in its location and routine.

  • Some remarkably talented and inspirational people will get a wonderful compliment this weekend, when former students of Ernie Threlkeld, Susie Saunders and Mel Owen will play a jazz concert in tribute to these fabulous music teachers, who passed away in recent years.

  • We get ourselves worked up about topics of important public debate, but when reality reaches out and slaps our cheek with the sting of the fragility of our very core, we can’t help but feel a big tear rolling down our public face.

    That’s because today we can almost see through downtown Shelbyville, its center, decimated in March by the tragic and awful fire that consumed three buildings, again struck by a fire that on Sunday beheaded the beautiful and marvelous old Chatham House on the 600 block of Washington Street.

  • We are so pleased that Shelby County again will have a face in the Kentucky Derby.

    Jockey Jon Court is back for his second ride in three years – after decades of having been left off the backs of the 20 3-year-olds entered each year – and we think that’s a sure bet for everyone.

    It’s not so much like in football or basketball or even golf, when the athlete’s hometown gets a mention on national TV, but it’s just such a magnet for additional community pride.

  • I have for many years enjoyed Horace Brown’s weekly articles on birds. It brings me no pleasure to correct what are significant factual errors in his article by such a passionate proponent of exploring the world of nature. I don’t suppose for a moment that I will be able to change his mind, but refuse to let unreferenced misstatements stand unrefuted (“The Evidence for Global Warming,” March 6).

  • Here are your typical preparations during Derby Week: Complete your wardrobe for the day, study the listings of horses that are in the newspaper, identify which one Calvin Borel is riding (that would be Revolutionary) or which one Todd Pletcher is training (that would be 25 percent of the projected field), wait until Saturday to see which horse looks nicest in the paddock or has the most emotional storyline, place your wager.

  • In autumn of 2009, I left my hometown of Hazard on a 500-mile walk to Oprah Winfrey’s studio in Chicago, Illinois, only 18 months after I finished extensive chemotherapy. The walk served two purposes: raising money for the American Cancer Society and hand delivering my writings to Oprah. I’ve dreamed of being an author since I was 6 years old. Operation Oprah led me up and down the Appalachian Mountains, through the entire state of Indiana and finally into the windy city. Along the way, I walked through your beautiful town of Shelbyville.

  • Every time I listen to the parents of the children who were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary, I am profoundly sad. I have three boys, and the grief and pain that a parent feels when their child is taken is hard to fathom. I can only imagine the magnitude of their grief.

  • It became apparent to me after reading Lisa King’s article published in The Sentinel-News  (“County trashing pickup plan?” April 19) that she and I were not at the same meeting.  I attended and spoke at the meeting and feel I need to clarify several discrepancies Ms. King reported in her article about the unpopular, proposed, mandatory or government franchised countywide garbage/recycling pickup the county wants to force upon its citizens.

  • The Shelby County Fiscal Court Legislative Committee’s plan to “step away” from creating curbside garbage and recycling for residents should be trashed.

    This is no time to step away from doing what is right, and there is no mitigating argument that will sway our belief that Shelby Countians should be able to discard trash and recyclables without having to drive somewhere or pay a third party to do so.

  • An article published in The Sentinel News (“Public education at a crossroad? Charter schools aren't answer,” My Word, April 10), written by J. Howard Griffith, raised some interesting questions about charter schools and what they could mean for the state of Kentucky, which, as the author notes, is one of only seven states that do not allow the formation of such educational options.

  • Eight years ago, Jessica Stivers had a dream, she said, that included a former classmate, Tylan Smither. “We met when we were four years old and attended the old Cropper Elementary,” she said.

    They had similar friends at Shelby County High School but never dated, even lost track of each other – until eight years ago, when she had the dream, mentioned it to her mother and then ran into Smither and his mother at Cracker Barrel.

  • With two important meetings this week among officials trying to develop curbside garbage pickup in Shelby County, the mission statement for this project has emerged from the man whose public meetings gave this concept momentum.

    That would be Rusty Newton, chair of the 109 Board, the entity that is in charge of solid-waste pickup in the county. This is what Mr. Newton told officials last week when they gathered to discuss a joint contract between the Shelbyville City Council and Shelby County Fiscal Court:

  • Wasn’t it nice to see a face from Shelbyville playing under the glaring spotlight of the NCAA Tournament’s Final 4?
    We speak, of course, about Antonita Slaughter, the latest of the talented Slaughters from Shelbyville, who spearheaded the University of Louisville to the women’s Final 4 and thus became the first woman from Shelby County to play in that event.

  • If you’ve ever run a marathon, thought about running a marathon or watched someone you love run one, you understand the pain. You see those faces and those strides mere yards from the finish line. You see happiness and even tears struggling past unrelenting physical torment. You sense the adrenalin that is coursing, grasp that the last possible bits of energy are being summoned. Joy is rising and overtaking pain. The finish line is the joy line. The finish is the ecstasy after the agony.